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• . . SOT 






EDO? DEflEfiMfi 

California State Library 



'.' C ♦ 



. i 22547 



iU.'i 1903 



VOL XL. No. 1. 

36 GEARY STREET. 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JANUARY 4, 1902. 



SUBSCRIPTION 
THREE DOLLARS A YEAR 




3 



[January 4, 1902 



HI JOTTINGS. j|| 



PALO ALTO STOCK FARM is beyond question 
the greatest of all tlie breeding farms established 
for the production of the American trotter, but like 
everything else it will some day bo but a memory. 
Senator Stanford had the advantago of a combination 
of forces that are not possessed by the average breeder, 
viz: brains and money. He had both and used them 
well, and on Palo Alto Stock Farm has been founded 
many of the prosent and more of the future greitest 
trotting families. Every year, on the Pacific Coast 
and through the Eastern circuits many horses trot or 
pace themselves into prominence that were either biel 
en this groat farm, sired by its stallions or produced 
by its mares. There has never been an auction sale cf 
Polo Alto stock but performers or producers have 
beon developed from the animals sold. It is such un- 
disputable facts as these that lead mo to mako an 
attempt to impress upon the minds of farmers and 
horse breeders that the opportunity to get some of 
this Palo Alto blood will not always be offered. In the 
course of time the many thousands of acres which 
belong to tho Stanford Estate, and which have beon 
given to the great University founded by the late 
Senator and his estimable wife, will bo devoted toother 
things than horso breeding, and the annual sales of 
trotting bred stock will be but a thing of the past as 
are already its sales of thoroughbreds. The wise horse 
breeders and farmers of this country will therefore 
embrace tho few remaining opportunities that are 
offered to secure possession of Palo Alto bred stock. 
On Thursday, the 30th of January, this year, about 
forty head of broodmares from the Palo Alto Farm 
will be sold by William G. Layng at the Occidental 
Horse Exchange in this city. There are many grandly 
bred and line individuals among them. My advice to 
farmers and others who have a place to keep a few of 
these mares, is to attend the sale and purchase them. 
It is the small breeder who has the advantage in roar- 
ing colts, and a very large proportion of tho champion 
race horses were bred on other than the large stock 
farms. Auction sales, like the one to be held this 
month, give the small breeder an opportunity of secur- 
ing at his own and a low price, blood and individuality 
that has probably cost tho big breeder many thousands 
of dollari to proluco. And the small breeder should 
never allow these opportunities to escapo him. I 
would not advise any one to attend any sale and pur. 
chase everything offered, but I believe that the pur- 
chase by a farmer or small breeder of ono or two of 
these mares will bo a paying investment in eight cases 
out of ten if tho animal and its produce are properly 
handled. Forty broodmares will not supply the de- 
mand that exists in California to-day, and the buyer 
who gets ono that is fairly bred and a good individual 
will be fortunato. Tho catalogues have not yet been 
issued and I do not know what forty of the several 
hundred at Palo Alto are to bo sold, but I know there 
will be several future producers of extreme speed 
among them, as the record of every past sale is proof 
conclusive of this prediction. 



In the Holiday edition of the Breeder and Sports- 
man it was stated that Mr. C. J. Hamlin of New York 
and Mr. A. B. Spreckels of California were the only 
men who had bred two trotting mares that had ob- 
tained records better than 2:10. This .statement is 
true as regards men, but when breeding farmt are 
considered Palo Alto will have to be added to the list, 
as from its paddocks have come Sunol 2:08} and Eleata 
2:08ij. The latter was bred at Palo Alto, but after the 
death of Senator Stanford. 



There is a rumor to the effect that some time dur- 
ing the next three weeks several of the district agri- 
cultural associations of California will announce dates 
'or their fairs and race meetings of 1002. I hope the 
rumor is true, and that the long-looked-for "move" on 
the part of these associations will materialize. There 
are four or five districts that I know will be in line. 
Secretary Bell of Napa tells me that his district will 
hold a fair, no matter whether any other district does 
or not, and that good-si/.ed purses will be given. The 
Napa Board is only waiting for the Governor to fiil a 
few- vacancies in its body, and as soon as the appoint- 
ments are made they will meet and arrange a program 
and announce it. Tho date they want is August 11th 
to 18th and their purses will be from $500 to $700. 
Woodland will give a fair to a certainty; Concord, 
Contra Costa county, will be in line, and Oakland, 
Stockton, Hanford, Salinas, Hollister and Los Angeles 
will all give meetings, while tho State Fair will make 
an effort this year to beat all former records. An 
effort is to be made to arrange a main circuit of five 
or six different districts that will be able to give purses 
of not less than $500 and some as high as $1000. It is 



not every district that can do this, but Petaluma, 
Santa Rosa. Napa, Oakland, Woodland, Stockton, 
San Jose and Fresno can well afford to arrange for 
high class fairs and good racing. If the proposed 
revival amounts to anything it will begin to take form 
this month. If not, the horsemen may as well make 
up their minds to go up north or enter at Denver and 
on through tho East if they desire to race. 



Since the racing of two year olds has become rather 
unpopular, why should tho season for breeding in 
California close Juno 1st? Of course the man who 
breeds with tho idea of entering tho foal in two and 
three year old stakes wants the foal to come early that 
he may have all tho advantages of growth and train- 
ing possible, but there are hundreds who send mares 
to stallions every year who never expect to race the 
produce, and there is no reason why colts foaled in the 
summer or fall should not be as strong and vigorous 
as spring colts if tho mares are properly fed. The 
alfalfa fields of the California valleys, and the late 
green feed in the mountain districts enable mares pas- 
tured on them to give as good a flow of milk as those 
pastured on natural grasses during the spring. The 
most ruggod, stoutest and best campaigner that has 
beon seen in California for years is Sir Albert S. 2:08ij, 
and the date of his foaling was June 24tb. 18!lti. so that 
his dam did not have much chance at spring grass 
when suckling him. Tnere are many cattle breeders 
who claim that fall calves make a better growth than 
spring calves in California as they are weaned in the 
spring when green feed is abundant, while the early 
spring calf is taken from its mother in tho fall when 
dry feed and cool weather during the winter cause it 
to lose flesh instead of gaining it. A longer season for 
stallions would enable them to serve a greater number 
of mares. It might be a good idea to charge more 
money for a spring service foe than for a fall fee, and 
I believe this has been done with success in some 
instances. 



Directors of district associations who look with dis 
trust upon the offering of large purses this year, as has 
been suggested by many of the leading horsemen of 
California, should not get the idea that the request is 
for large purses clear through the program. No asso- 
ciation should offer a cent more than it can afford to 
give, and a $300 purse that is paid is better than ono 
of $1000 that is unpaid. But every association can 
alford to give at least a couple of good sized stakes, 
one for trotters and the other for pacers, and if a half 
dozen of the principal districts will open two early 
closing stakes of $1000 each, there is no doubt but they 
will fill, aid greatly in filling all the other races on tho 
program and do much to make the circuit of 1002 an 
assured success. These stakes should be announced 
not any later than February 1st, and should close by 
March 1st with three or four small payments, leaving 
the bulk of tho entrance money to be paid at tho start. 
In all probability stakes for 2:30 trotters and 2:25 pacers 
will fill with the largest number of entries, but there 
are faster classes than these that will fill so well that 
they will cost the association giving them but very 
little money. 

Death of Elloree 2:08 1-2. 



The mare Elloree 2:08J by Axtell 2:12 is dead. She 
was sold at the Marcus Daly sale in New York recently 
for $2000 and purchased by Mr. Malcolm Forbes, who 
intended breeding her to Bingen 2:00.1. Her dam was 
by Robert McGregor. Mr. C. W. Williams, of Inde- 
pendence, Iowa, bred Elloree and campaigned her two 
or three years, giving her a record of 2:1 H. She was 
then sold and campaigned by Geo Saunders and 
reduced her record to 2:08} in 1899. She was one of 
the gamest and best race mares in the country and 
one of the handsomest in conformation. Her record 
was made in tho fourth heat of a race where she de- 
feated Tommy Britten, Cresceus, Pilatus, Belle J., 
Battleton, Caracalla, Gayton, Monterey and Oakland 
Baron. She won the fourth, fifth and sixth hoats of 
this race, Tommy Britton having captured the first 
and second and Cresceus the third. The fourth heat 
was the fastest of the race. She had two or three 
foals by Atherton, one of them, Jeffrey, having a rec- 
ord of 2:27 J . Her weanling by Prodigal brought $1200 
at the Daly disporsal sale last month. 



S. J. Dunlop, who for many years was a Southern 
Pacific conductor is now located at Hanford, Tulare 
county, in the livery business and has his stallion 
Strathway, sire of Toggles 2:08}, and others there. 
Mr. Dunlop writes that Strathway is limited to sixty 
mares this year and fifty-three have alroady been 
booked, so that ho will be turning mares away before 
tho season really opens. Strathway, with the proper 
opportunities, will be one of the greatest producing 
stallions in the country. His get nearly all go fast as 
soon as placed in training. 



Matinee Racing at Los Angeles. 

There was perfect weather at Los Angeles on Christ- 
mas Day and over three thousand people turned out 
to enjoy tho racing furnished by members of the Driv- 
ing Club of that city at Agricultural Park. Six races 
woro on the card. In the second race in which there 
were four starters great interest was manifested as the 
horses were all fast and were to be driven by their 
owners. Mr. Geo. W. Ford won in straight heats with 
his stallion, Neernut, both heats being in 2:17 flat. 
The McKinnoy mare, Sweet. Marie, was piloted by her 
new owner, Wm. Garland, who paid $3150 a few days 
before at tho Potter sale, but third was the best she 
could do. 

In the double team race Mr. Byron Erkenbreeher 
won handily with Floretta Belle and Hanford Medium, 
and it is thought these pacers will be able to pole in 
2:20 with more training. 

Mr. E. T. Earl won tho second heat of the fifth race 
with his new purchase, Sweetheart, and although 
unable to win tho race drove tho fastest quarter shown 
during the afternoon— 3U seconds. Mr. Mosher won 
the raco with his mare, Scappoose, reducing her 
record from 2:10} to 2:15] in tho first heat. 

During the afternoon tho Driving Club presented 
Mrs. Florence E. Chandler, tho secretary of the club, 
with a handsome silver-mounted pocketbook in token 
of their appreciation of her work for tho club during 
tho past year. 

Bonn ART. 
First race, mile dash, 2:25 trot : 

Mi&ft b B „■■ (J- H. Reynolds) 1 

m ; lk p (A. W. Bruoer 2 

Mmvitza. b m (R. b. Moorhesd! 3 

Time-2:28. 

Second race, mile heats, 2 in 3, free for all trot : 

Neeruut. b h ] (G.W.Ford) 1 I 

\endome. hg (W. H Stirason) 8 2 

Sweet Marie, bm (Wm. Garland) 3 3 

Maggie McKiuney, blk m ( VV. M. Budinger) 4 4 

Time— 2:17, 2:17. 

Third race, mile dash for teams: 

Floretta Belle anil Hanford Medium (Byron Erkenbreeher! 1 

General Miles and Bastina (G.B.Talbot) 2 

Montecito Boy and Johnny Brown (L. J. Felton) 3 

Time— 2:304. 

Fourth race, mile heats, 2 in 3, 2:30 pace: 

Burley F (H. G. Bundrem) 1 1 

Jingle, blk g ; (H.G.Otis) 3 2 

LMy May, bm (F. D. Lewis) 2 3 

Maxneer.bg (J. L. Elgbolt ) 5 1 

Johnny Brown, b g (If. A. Corfman) 4 5 

Time— 2:27*, 2:26V4. 

Fifth race, mile heats, 2 in 3, 2:20 pace : 

Scappoose. b m (M. B. Mosher) I 2 I 

Sweet Heart, b m (E. T. Earl) 2 1 3 

Uusswood bm (J. W. Spooner) 3 3 2 

Time- 2:15)4-, 2:19*, 2:10. 

Sixth race, mile dash, 2:10 trot: 

George bg (R. E. Muncey) 1 

Redskin, eh g (|| n. Mosher) 2 

My Girl, b m Dr. John Ferbert) 3 

Happy Boy, chg (ArthurGore) 4 

Time— 2:29)4. 



Lawson Boosts the Trotter. 



In describing his new farm, Dreamwold, and in tell- 
ing what he intends doing there, T. W. Lawson pays 
the following tribute to the trotter: 

"We all know what the American trotter can do for 
speed, but if any one has any doubt what he can do 
for beauty and style let me remind him that I have in 
my stables at the present time at least twenty Ameri- 
can bred trotting stock, short tail horses, any ono of 
which can beat anybody's horse in the world in the 
show ring, and I believe I can with any one of forty 
out stylo any other horse in the show ring unless he is 
trotting bred, and at the same time I will not have a 
show horso in tho stable that is not intelligent enough 
to bo driven upon the city streets any day in the year 
in ordinary gear and without a check rein of any kind, 
by any of the grown members of ray family. Really, 
is this not a tremendous statement to make, and does 
it not show the possibilities of the American trotter? 
Think of any one of my ten or twelve stallions that 
bound into the show ring with all the fire and dash of 
high bred, young — for most of them a"0 four to soven 
years old — stallion life, and then think that they aro 
driven each day upon tho city streets by amateur family 
drivers: and one word more and I will cease blowing 
the horn of the grandest of all the grand animal king- 
dom, the American horse: 

"I sent Glorious Red Cloud into probably the great- 
est horse show the world has ever seen— at least a 
show with the largest number of nearly perfect car- 
riage horses the world has ever seen — two years after 
ho had won the championship, and beat everything 
hands down. Think what there must be in a breed 
that can go into retirement for two years and then 
beat the best of them, and look at Lord Brilliant year 
after yoar beating all comers. I tell you the American 
trotting horso is tfie horse for any spot or place, and he 
is what I am going to try and 'raise' in all his many 
moods and varioties at Dreamwold." 



Jackson's Napa Soda does not tangle the feetl 



January 4, 1902] 



3 



A Strong Condemnation of Heat Betting. 

Thore have been many articles written and published 
showing the evils of heat betting as conducted by 
bookmakers, but none that have gone to the point or 
hit harder than the following from the pen of the well 
known bookmaker and poolseller, E. R. Lowry, who 
is known all over the United States, having sold pools 
on races from Maine to California. Mr. Lowry 's article 
was written for the New York Trotter ami I'acer and 
appeared in the last issuo of that excellent journal 
It is as follows: 

"I have no desire to break into the ranks of the turf 
critics, but the "boss" papers are just now devoting 
considerable space to a subject that is very near to my 
heart, inasmuch as it has won for mo a heap of abuse 
from the other side, and uu,il the present momont I 
have never noticed that my ten years' denunciation of 
heat bookmaking was having- any other effect than to 
get me very much disliked by the Knights of the 
Chalk and exponents of Old Shylock's percentage card 
and grand lesson in usury, and while I have been tem- 
porarily retired from active participation in the game, 
I am tickled to see influential, |broad -minded men, 
who areinterested from the breeders' standpoint, come 
out and condemn the pernicious system which has 
carried more depreciation of values to the stock farms 
of America than it over donated to the cappers of 
racing associations; moreover, if you will but take the 
trouble to interview the first half dozen square men 
who are to-day campaigning horses you will find that 
the "Harness Game" is suffering worse from what is 
popularly known as "the 200 percent, cinch," "Cappor" 
and "Copper off" system than ever before, and present 
indications point to an inclination to make it general 
by lease or ownership. 

"I want to go on record as saying now that tho 
question has become a burning one. There are 30 
heats laid up for coin of the realm to one for tho im- 
provement of chances of winning; and always will be 
as long as the opportunity is offered to make more 
money dropping a heat or two than the whole season's 
salary amounts to or than first money (which is never 
sure). Let it be distinctly understood that I speak by 
the card, as I booked for five years continuously my- 
self after my services wore no longer acceptable to the 
opulent race managers, who didn't like my system- 
"I still claim, and always will, that the auction and 
mutual mode of betting, where public money makes 
the price — when fairly and honestly conducted — is the 
only system of handling the public's money on harness 
races, and the only plan that protects the public against 
underhanded methods by allowing them to see just 
where and when the money is being played. Look at 
it squarely and let the objectors have their say. 

"If you, in selling the auction pools, sell the horses 
out singly, as long as the owner or the public want to 
play them singly you provide a popular game. But 
when you deprive the owner or the public of such op- 
portunity by forcing them to take an entire field in a 
race to play their choice or entry you deny them their 
rights, consequently your game is unpopular. There 
should be a rule substituted for the old one which 
reads, "Evidence by affidavit will be held sacred," to 
read: The acceptance by a pool seller of a commission 
to place money on the field against any horses, whether 
successfully executed or not, shall be considered con- 
clusive evidence of wrong doing, and tho penalty shall 
be expulsion. If such a rule had been in force the 
past twenty years, say from Lorecta F.'s case and 
down the line, what a lot of value depreciation the 
breeders would have escapod! 

"Then, again, instead of the line of students of 'Shy- 
lock's percentage card,' If heat betting is to bo per- 
mitted, give us the only system devised where public 
money makes tho price and where, by giving the 
public a chance to see just how the money is placed, 
you afford them tho best protection you can offer- 
Not the old split-and rob system, with simply tho word 
of tho man who destroys the evidence and gives you 
what he likes, but an open, square, up-to-date systom 
on an unquestionable basis and where the public can 
see if the prominent horses are getting the proper 
support and where you are not refused if you want to 
make a bet and where there is no incentive to use your 
money to have the horse you have bet on lay up the 
heat. Figure the pool on a large blackboard above 
the heads of the people where all can see and conduct 
the business in a manner to win and maintain the con- 
fidence of the most suspicious, and that means 100 per- 
cent, of tho patrons of the avorago trotting meotings, 
where the 'bookies' are permitted to operate as they 
please now in these days, when we have a round dozen 
millionaires campaigning the representative stables, 
who will step Into the betting ring and wager moro 
money on their entries than all the bandy-legged, sure- 
thing men of bygone days put together. Really, I am 
ashamed to guess how much could be handled, but I 
can conscientiously say — and I believe every sensible, 
honest man who reads this article will agree with me — 



that the atmosphere would be so free from the over 
present suspicion that he wouldn't recognize the game, 
and those gentlemon who tho past season quit when tho 
campaign was half over and shipped their great strings 
home through sheer disgust at tho prevailing methods 
would r iturn and contribute that support the harness 
game can illy afford to lose. Put tho 'heat book' in 
the pile with tho old rod and black wheel and the other 
handicaps tho harness gamo has had saddled on to it 
and give intelligent men a chance to play their horses 
in an intelligent and fair manner just once and you will 
seethe sport step forward in response to the impetus 
which progressive men are string to givo it until it will 
amaze you. But, as Friend McKinney says, it will bo 
necessary for a few more associations to have personal 
representatives at tho Turf Congress. A curtailing of 
tho proxy evil or, like the annual prayer tho Board of 
Stewards of tho Grand Circuit sends up, for active 
representation on tho parent boards of review, you 
will find wh^n the bell rings and the blue birds whistle 
the same old rules, the same old faces and the same old 
heat buying aggregation will be to the fore. Tho same 
old collar for tho harness games's neck at the same old 
stand. You hear those yells. Yours on races and not 
on heats, for fair sport and opon betting." 

E. R. Lowry. 



The Old Rocking Horse. 

Battered ami bruised and worn and old, 

Bereft of its mane and tail, 
A veteran charger, staunch and bold, 

He has weathered life's fierce gales. 

The hero of many a gallant raid, 

In many a bloodless war, 
A soldier of fortune, undismayed, 

By battle and wound and scar! 

'Neath the guiding touch of a little hand 

He has traveled many a mile 
Through the wonderful realms of " PlayliUu Land,' 

Where tho spirits of Fancy smile. 

But, strange to say, in his boldest Might, 

Though he halted or rested not 
Through all his travels by day and night— 

Ho has stood in the self-same spot. 

He was ridden far, he was ridden hard, 

He has borne fierce brunts and blows. 
And oft has felt, as a sweet reward, 

A kiss on his worn-out nose. 

And though he is rather the worse for wear, 

And crippled and scarred and old, 
In the eyes of his master he still is fair 

And worth his weight in gold. 

— Exchange, 

Advice to Breeders. 

The first great thing in the horse business to remem- 
ber is that good stock always brings the top price, and 
when you find a breeder that has made a success he 
will tell you that it has been accomplished by the 
better breeding. Many of the chronic grumblers, and 
there are many in the horse business, predict that 
"horses will soon go down again, after a short time, or 
just as soon as people goto breeding again." Don't 
you give this a minute's thought for horses will be 
well up in price for the next decade. What is needed 
is to breed quality, breed them still better; breed them 
larger; breed them of a higher class; breed the market 
horse and breed every horse strictly to his class. In 
ordor to breed horses for export they must be strictly 
first class in every respect. There is a difference be- 
tween the export classes and tho general American 
demand, and tho former demands a trifle higher quality 
— an animal that is free from blemishes. According 
to a noted western dealer there are five separate and 
distinct classes of export and market animals, and he 
thus describes them: 

Class No. 1. Road, carriage and coach horses must 
be of good color, well bred, fifteen and a half to sixteen 
hands; plenty of stylo and action, with fine heads and 
necks; plenty of bone and substance, short backs, 
smooth hips, round in the barrel, with a well sprung 
rib. Must have a good gait and be a good travclor. 
The more action and speod the bettor, and, above all, 
must bo a straight lino movor, without swinging tho 
feet in or out, but tho action and movoment should bo 
graceful. This class hasadvancod very much in price, 
and was never so high in American markets as they 
are to-day. There is no limit to tho prico if thoy aro 
of good, high quality, and will range all tho way from 
$150 to $1000 por head. In case of alack of trotting 
bred stallions to produco this class, the French coach 
horse can bo crossed with tho trotting bred marcs with 
extremely favorable results. It is the opinion of tho 
best breeders and horsomon that this will prove a very 
good cross, and have tho tendoncy to increase tho size 
of our American horses. It is believed, too, that this 
class will not only incroaso tho size, but will add largely 
to fixing tho type of tho carriage and coach horsei 
that shall possess size, quality, action and stylo, and 
still retain the road qualities required, as ovory harness 
horse should bo well bred in ordor to stand the wear 
and tear of hard work upon city pavements. 

Class No. 2. Cab horso, rather blocky, weigh about 
1050 pounds, stands fiftoon and a fourth hands high; 
smooth made, with bono and substance, fair traveler. 
This class of horses is very salablo for many purposes, 



but there are always plenty in the market, and too 
plenty to be a profitable class to raiso. But they 
always sell roadily at what they are worth. 

Class No. 3. An omnibus horso is a blocky, smooth 
made horso, very rugged, with lots of substanco and 
plenty of bone; must shapo himself well in harness, 
good action, with a straight lino movement, stand 
fifteen and a fourth to fifteen and three-fourths high, 
weigh from 1200 to 1400 pounds. This class of horse 
includes tho quality, not only of the omnibus horse, 
but an oxprcss and general use horse. The English 
use tho more blocky, lower sot onos for 'busses, While 
the larger ones are U9ed for express and general use. 
This is a class of horses in the strongest demand in all 
American and foreign markets, and sell from $125 to 
$150. They can be producod best by a cross between 
the draft horso and smaller mare that is a grade or 
roadster bred. This horse must be active and rugged 
with oasy movements. 

Class No. 4. The draft horse should weigh from 
1500 to 2200 pounds; blocky made, heavy bone, with 
smooth finish, good quality and action, and a first 
class draft horse in every respect. The present price 
is from $150 to $350, and the best specimens sell even 
as high as $400. This class is one of the most salable, 
and finds ready sale in domestic and foreign markets. 
They should be produced from tho best heavy draft 
mare, of good quality, crossed with tho best heavy 
draft horse of high quality, regardless of what partic- 
ular breed of tho draft horse he may bo, as long as ho 
possesses all the qualifications of the draft horso. 
This class of horse is very scarce in all tho markets 
and they are steadily increasing in prices, and great 
inducements are ottered to produce them. 

Class No. 5. The Amorican trotter in all cases must 
be a high bred trotting horse, with good bone and 
substance, high finish, good stylo, action and disposi- 
tion and the more speed he has the higher price he 
will bring, ranging in prico from $200 to $10,000, 
according to his quality, size and what he can do. All 
horses for export and domestic markets should bo 
sound and without blemish, as far as possible. 



Onward. 

Not only does Onward, with his nine 2:10 performers 
to his credit lead all sons of George Wilkes as a 2:10 
sire, but he leads all sires to date, and the Onward 
family includes more 2:10 performers than does any 
other branch of the George Wilkes family ( says West- 
ern Horseman. This showing by Onward gives somo 
idea of how far wrong even many well meaning and 
well posted horsemen may go in selecting a young 
stallion as a future great sire. It is no secret among 
horsemen that Onward, when a young horse, was held 
in contempt by many Kentucky breeders, and that it 
was nothing unusual to hear him referred to as "Bob 
Pepper's bull." Ho was growthy, rather coarso and 
phlegmatic, and, until ho made a decided reputation 
as a sire, had but one real advocate and admirer, and 
that was his owner, the late Col. R. P. Pepper. Col. 
Pepper believed in Onward from the very date of his 
birth and bought him at the first opportunity. His 
faith in Onward very nearly made a pauper of Col. 
Pepper at one time, but, a few years later, it made 
him a rich man. While talking on this subjoct, Col. 
Pepper once said to the writer: "In the spring of 
1887 it looked like I was hopelessly busted financially, 
but my faith in Onward never wavered, and I con- 
tinued to borrow a few dollars from this ono and that 
one, and finally got 'out to the races' with a few On- 
ward youngsters. Onward put seven in the list that 
season, and in October I sold $58,000 worth of his get." 
Thus, in a single soason, Onward made rich his owner, 
whom ho bad previously led up to tho very brink of 
bankruptcy. The great thrco year old filly, Houii 
made her dobut that year, and secured a record of 
2:19;}. Acolyte (later sold for $40,000), also a threo 
year old, took a record of 2:30 and Linnotto and Motor, 
two other threo yoars olds, also took records of 2:29} 
and 2:291, respectively, tho other standard porformors 
for Onward that season being Onslaught (4) 2:28J, 
Counsellor 2:24 and Emulation 2:29.}. Like a metoor 
Onward appeared in tho constellation of groat speed 
sires, and, with the constancy of the orb of day, 
he continues to shine with regularly increasing bril- 
liancy. Ho leads tho world as a siro of 2:30 porformors, 
of 2:20 porformors and of 2:10 performers, and his 
descendants make up the aristocratic "400" of the 
oquino raco as record holders. 

J. M. Alviso's fast pacer, Roy del Diablo 2:23j, that 
took his record as a two year old, will be one of tho 
money winners this year if raced. Ho wasgoldcd last 
yoar and turned out and has filled out wondorfully. 
He should be one of the fastest livo yoar olds of 1902 ( 
as ho has a tremendous burst of speed and is as gamo 
as a pobblo. Alviso has bogun jogging him at Ploas- 
anton. 

Strike! — if thoy don't give you Jackson's Nana Soda 



4 



History Makers of San Bernardino County. 

San Bernardino, Dec. 2:1, 1901. 

The children and colts of this jounty aro to bo its 
history makers. Wise public instructors and philan- 
thropists aro bending every energy to place our schools 
and scholarship on an •quality with tho best in Amer- 
ica; they aro a close second at present and in another 
decade will have trained tho coveted position. 

Those interested in horsos aro pursuing the same 
intelligent course regarding the roaring of colts in- 
tended to make horse history: they a, "° receiving the 
care and kind attention of men who have planned their 
lives and destiny for them: tho environments of these 
youngsters aro well calculated to develop theui into 
the greatest expectations of their owners. Our towns- 
man Wm. Itourko, the breeder of Hazel Kinney 2:00' 
and her dam Baby's Gift, has two great prospects so 
far as high form is concerned, and in breeding they 
are tho equal of any. Tho first is by Stam B. 2:1 1 j, 
dam Hazel Kinney 2:0!>j: the writer does not know of a 
colt (trotting bred) in tho State having such a speed 
inheritance. The second one owned by Mr. Bourko is 
a yoarling by Xombro 2:11 out of the dam of Hazel 
Kinney 2:0 >',. She : s a perfect filly in gait, color, size 
and disposition. Mr. Bourke does not intend to stop 
with these, as he has already rent the dam of Hazel 
Kinney 2:0!l.J to the harem of McKinney 2:1 1 1 Mr. 
James Campbell, the blacksmith who puts 2:10 shoes 
on all tho trotters entering his shop, has two very 
promising colts by Zombro out of a Clay mare of great 
beauty and endurance. Mr. Johnson, our County 
Recorder, has a tine colt by Zombro out of an Almont 
mate. Mr. James Murry has two very fine colts by 
Hillsdale 2:l. r i out of a mare nearly thoroughbred. Mr. 
Breeokman has a yearling by Zombro 2:11 and one by 
Zolock 2: KM out of mares by Raymond 2:^7 by Sim- 
mons. Mr. H. 15. Smith, of Colton, has a grand filly 
by Zombro 2:11 out of Alta Rena 2:27 as a three year 
old, with trial of 2:12 as a five year old. Our druggist, 
Dr. White, has a Ally by Zolock out of a mare very 
highly bred in thoroughbred that is a duplicate of its 
sire except as to color. Dr. W. T. Oruie, veterinary 
surgeon, is the owner of two very lino fillies hy Zolock; 
ono out of a mare by Will Crocker, bred by M. M. 
Hotter, of Los Angoles; tho other out of Belinda, tho 
dam of Roan Wilkes, 2:12:{ at three yea' s of age. Mr. 
Hopkins has a very rangy colt by Zombro out of a 
mare by Maximillian, he by Echo; second dam thor- 
oughbred. Mr. Hoyt has a very promising young 
a nimal by Neernut, dam a thoroughbred maro which 
is very nicely gaited, showing quarters and halves at 
a 2:.'1() gait and bolter. S. B Wright, of Colton, the 
owner of Harry Madison 2:27, is the possessor of a lino 
Ally by Zolock; this liily took tho Brat prize as a year- 
ling at tho Twenty-eighth Agricultural District Fair 
last soason. Thero is a colt of good promiso hore sired 
by Lottery, he by Kleetionoor, Lottery's dam the 
great) race maroToxaua thoroughbred. The first dam 
of this colt is Chalmoogre by Kono R. 2:18, ho by 
Magic, he by Klmo; second lu»\ by Berlin, third dam 
not traced. This colt, although out of pasture only 
seven weoks, shows quarters trotting in 39] seconds. 
His trainer, Mr. John Donohuo (or as he is often called, 
Whispering Johnny), has a largo string of youngsters 
in charge — his record as a trainer is constantly grow- 
ing better, as he never breaks down or has a lame 
colt or horse. The raco track at this placo will soon 
be rouiodelled entirely as to buildings, track, water 
privileges, etc., and wo hopo by next season to follow 
Los Angeles in a race meeting that wdl equal any ever 
held in Southern California. Tho list of owners of 
well bred colts might bo extended to at least three 
times tho number given and [would say those men- 
tioned aro no better than tho un mentioned ones here- 
abouts. Later I will tell you something of tho speed 
prospects of our Zombro and Zolock colts. 

A I.CANTELLUM. 

Mount Vkkxon, N. Y , June 10, 1801. 

Dr. S. .1. Tulllt— Dear Sir: I have used your Elixir for some 
time— that is, the veterinary — and bare bought dozens of it, aud 
use it fur leg ami body wash on my horses ami for household pur- 
poses also 1 have been troubled with intestine indigestion my- 
self, anil ean't seem to lind anything that helps me: have been 
doctoring with the best doctors here, and the other day I was 
working my horses at the Empire City Track and had it so bad 
that I could hardly sit on the sulky, and when I got home I took 
half a teaspoonful of the Elixir in a glass of hot water, and an- 
other in about an hour, and it fixed me up all O. K. I thought that 
perhaps the Veterinary Elixir was not made to take, but thought 
if it would not kill a horse it wouldn't kill me. So I took it and it 
tixed me up all right. I use it for everything. Last spring my 
wife had some Hne Barred Plymouth Rock chickens, and they had 
the roup. I thought they would die anyway, so I gave them a 
spoonful of the Elixir and wet their heads with it. and expected 
that would tlx them, and to our astonishment we never lost one of 
them, so you see I think It is a good thing. The only thing it has 
failed to do for me is: I have a stallion by Electricity 8:17)$, and I 
used it on him for a bad curb, and it didn't seem to do the job on 
that If I could fix that up on him. I could slip him in 2:1(1 sure, 
l'erhapsl haven't used it right. If you have anything in the way 
of special directions I wish you would give them to me. There is 
no one here that sells the Elixir You can send me a half dozen 
bottles of the Family Elixir and one dozen of the Veterinary. If 
you wili give me the wholesale price on it, I will order a number 
"of dozen of it. and si ll it here. Von can s.-nd it by express C. O. D 
if you like, or send me a bill, and I will semi clu ck fur same 

Yours truly, B. Fit ink Hi i.vka 185 Overlook St. 

On a hot day drink Jackson's Napa Soda lemonade 
and be refreshed. 



(The Qvztbev tutfc iTtyc»vt$mmt 



An Uncrowned King. 



Lol and behold! 

An uncrowned king in embryo: 

a lean lank, leggy two-year-old, 

Sans shape, sans llesh. sans everything— 

Hut pedigree: , 

\ blooded son of blooded sire, 

Begot from dam who spurned the earth 

With scornful toot; 

F.ach one a mint for golden coin 

As yard by yard in freuzied speed 

She left I he post behind 

The Barge of victories won 
Hy sire ami dam 
I s i n my blood . 

A constant spur which laughs away 
The sodden miles 
t H track and turf 

Which bid me welcome in the days to come. 

The Future :lt" am I, 

The coming king, 

A ti onarch. potentate, 

Killer by Hie right Divine; 

A "ciuch," a "sure thing" 

And a golden calf 

For shrieking throngs who hail me witiner. 

This am I— 

A coming favorite, 

At the post: 

With countless wires stretched ahead - 
Each one a jewel for my coming crown. 
Mv world a homestretch, 
E'en a golden path 
With emerald fields 

And grandstands 

Wife with maddened hordes. 

Who greet my comiug 

And who urge me past 

To victory won 

Ami triumphs held in store, 

In long, unbroken sequence. 

This 1 am— 

A two year old. 

A thing of blood aud breeding, 

The joy of owners, 

Trainers, stable boys aud touts, 

A name to conjure with, 

To deck a program, 

Or to grace in ink the restless pens 

( il dally scribes 

Who build me monuments of praise 
For eager eyes to grave 
( >n memories 

Rich wilh stored tradition 

( >l former kings dethroned. 

The cry, the shout, the joyous scream 

Is mine 

From raving crowds 

Who voice in gladdened tones 

The fulsome praise 

Which rends t lie air 

And sends it forth in echoing wares, 

Which tells my name 

Anear and far 

Ami spurs the lightning e'en 

To quicker throbs 

< )f pent up effort in its mad desire 

To name me winner 

d\er all the land. 

All th's am I. 

A child of destiny 

Ami a two year old. — Prim-r. 



Influence of Horse Shows. 



Wthin recent years tho development of horse shows, 
Kast, West, North aud South, has bocomo remarkable. 
Having their greatest encouragemont in the Bast they 
gradually spread to tho largor Western cities, and 
they havo now become so prevalent as to bo annual 
events in tho cities of all sections. It is generally 
thought that theso aro merely fashionable events, 
intended fot the display and recreation of those having 
little to do with the active business of life, but a deeper 
study of the subject, will show that theso exhibitions 
have a marked inlluonce on tho development of our 
horse breeding interests. 

When tho racing calendar was established some 
hundreds of years ago, running horses wore given an 
impetus which, in turn, reacted on tho thoroughbred 
horse to such a degi-30 as to make it, without excep- 
tion, the leading breed of horses, and thus untold good 
was accomplished for the thoroughbred interests. 
Later, with the establishment of trotting races earlier 
in the century, and tho publication of tho Year Hook 
giving tho records made, tho trotting horse was 
brought to tho front, and as a result occupies at this 
time a more prominent place among the breeds of our 
light horses. 

The hor?e shows seem to offer the samo stimulus to 
the harness raco that has been given to tho others. 
Tho horse show as it is conducted becomes an object 
lesson to tho people of cities who use horses as to tho 
proper appointments and the right typo of a horse 
that should go with them. 

Two or throo successful horse shows in a city are 
usually sufficient to start the Improvement. It leads 
some one who has a preference for horses of this kind 
to invest in an unusually attractive pair, which in turn, 
stimulates tho emulation of other lovers of horses, and 
in the course of a year or so the character of tho 
equipages of the city become markedly changed for 
the bettor. This has boen noticed in a groat many 
cases, and invariably follows proporly conducted shows. 

While these results, at first consideration, do not 
seem to have direct application to the horse industry 
of our farmers, yet they materially stimulate the pro- 
duction of a high class harness horse throughout the 
country. These horses which havo come to the city 
as a result of the horse show have been secured by the 
dealers, who have spent some time in training and 
mannering them for city use. The dealers, in turn, 
havo bought them from the farmers, and it seems rea- 
sonable to suppose that, with tho increasing demand 
for this typo of horse, there must follow a hotter price. 

To raise tho harness horse up to tho point whore he 
is ready to go into the dealer's hands will require tho 
best knowledge of a horseman, and consequently it 



[January 4, 1902 



will never be produced too numerously. Owing to the 
obstacles in the way of producing such a horse, and 
the unusual difficulties in preparing it for the market 
this production will never be the work of the genera 1 
farmer; but there are a great many who are fond of 
horses and ha v e the facilities to produce them of this 
type at a largo profit. 

If one situated in this way will observe some care in 
the selection of mares, seeing that they have the high 
aud knee-folding action o' the coach horse, together 
with the fulness of type which is desirable, and breed 
such a mare to a horse possessing the same character- 
istics, thero is very little uncertainty about the eolt 
developing into a horse suitable for harness work. 

When ready for market such a horse may be sold 
quicker, and often with more prolit, than one of any 
other typo. With the general run of farmers draught 
horses aro without question the most profitable, but 
where mares of the kind mentioned havo been secured 
and bred to stallions possessing tho characteristics 
described, there certainly is a very large field for profi- 
able production by those having inclinations in this 
direction. — Tin llnmcrtnul. 



Training ol War Horses. 

The main difficulty in training a war horse is to 
accustom the animal to tho thunder of firearms. A 
horse that can bo quickly trained to the roar of can- 
non and musketry is an acquisition which instructors 
know how to appreciate. You hear people talk glibly 
enough nowadays of supplying our troops in the East 
with plenty of remounts, and it's quite evident from 
the remarks they make that they imagine they need 
only to lasso a few thousand wild horses in Texas, ship 
them off to Manila and — voilo! our soldiers are re- 
mounted. Although most horses can be quickly 
trained to face the most withering fire, many are very 
dlffloult to convince that a tremendous noise is not 
necessarily a signal of danger, while some never can be 
taught to ignore the rattlo of musketry. 

Your correspondent has had the pleasure ol visiting 
tho farm of a trainer of war horses, situated in the 
wilds of Texas, fn afield adjoining the stables I found, 
ranged in a circle- ready for instruction, some three 
dozen lino horsos, including a few splendid chestnuts 
The instructor stood in the center of the circle, with 
the horses facing him, gave the signal to the attend- 
ants to be in readiness, and lired three chambers of a 
revolver in rapid succession. 

Instantly thero was a great commotion. Most of the 
horses reared and plunged, and it was only with the 
greatest difficulty that some of them were prevented 
from breaking away and racing madly about the field. 
A few, on the other hand, did nothing more than 
prick up their ears and toss their heads, and these 
were promptly taken away for test. The more restive 
ones, of course, were subjected to the revolver shots 
until they could face them unflinchingly. 

The second test is much more sovere. The hordes 
are galloped up to a supposed company of infantry, who 
fire simultaneously as soon as the animals have got 
properly into swing. The first volley usually plays 
havoc with the formation of the advancing cavalry 
and some of tho horses rear so wildly that their riders 
have considerable difficulty in keeping their saddles. 
In a few moments, however, the charge is continued, 
another volley fired — this time, of course, at close 
range— and tho formation is once more deranged. 

Tho maneuver is continued until, familiarity having 
bred contempt, the horses advance as readily in the 
face of musketry (both volleys and "straggling*' fire) 
as when faced by nothing at all. They are then taught 
in precisely the same way to disregard the boom of 
cannon. Once properly trained, a horse faces the 
deadly lire of an enemy on the field of battle with an 
absolute fearlessness, of which man, bo he brave as a 
lion, is incapable. This, however, is only natural. The 
horse has been taught to believe the din of battle to be 
quite meaningless and without result. When in actual 
warfare he sees horsos and men around him shattered 
and lifeless; thero is nothing to suggest to him that 
that same din of battle and death are in any way con- 
nected, and the report of firearms, consequently, for 
him has no terrors whatever. 

The whistling of bullets and the screaming of shells — 
unknown, of course, at tho maneuvers at home — whilo 
insignificant details to the horse, aro sadly full of mean- 
ing to the man, and often enough do our soldiers envy 
the ignorance of the horse — the "iguorance which is 
bliss. ' ' — Philadelphia Times. 



Among the pacers Alice Mapes was the fastest two 
year old of 1000. She took a record of 2:14j, and 
showed a trial in public of 2:09}. No two year old beat 
2:20 in the late campaign; in fact, no three year old 
earned a record as fast as the champion two year old 
of 1000. In the older division, Bonnie Direct 2:05$, 
held the four year old and the green pacer records of 
1000; while this season Audubon Boy 2:06 is the fastest 
four year old, and Shadow Chimes 2:0fi!| the fastest of 
the new pacers. 



January 4. 1902 1 





Notes and News. 



Worth Ober, the veteran trainer, is now located at 
the Pleasanton track. 

P. W. Hodges has over a dozen horses in training at 
the Los Angeles track. 

Ti •uman's Brother by Electioneer reduced his record 
from 2:18', to 2:10J last year. 

Stallion feesare high in Europe. Greenhrino stands 
for $.")()(), Athanio for 8430, Axmure for $150. 



The balance in the treasury of the National Trotting 
Association on November 1st was $20,044. 2ii. 



There are eight stallions that have sired one hun- 
dred or more 2:30 performers. Nutwood leads them 
all, with 172 to his credit 



While there were many big purses and stakes on the 
eastern Grand Circuit last year there will be more of 
them and larger ones this year. 



New England horsemen are discussing the question, 
"Who will drive Anaconda 2:0Iij in 11102?" since it is 
known that Jack Trout will not. 



William Cecil is breaking a lot of yearlings by Nut- 
wood Wilkes 2:16} at the Nutwood Stock Farm and 
there is natural speed shown every time he gets one 
started. 

Faustino 2:12j by Sidney is being used on the road 
by L. N. Kelly, of Lancaster, N. V., who says he will 
drive him into Buffalo some day and let the" fast ones 
of this city tackle him. 

The photo engraving of the stallion, John A. M< - 
Kei-ron 2:06ij, which appears in the Christmas Horse- 
man, is from one of the most beautiful pictures over 
taken of a horse in harness. 



Every good mare should be bred this year. The 
cheap mares without pedigree or extra good qualities 
should never be sent to anything but a jack, and first 
class mules need not be expected even then. 



Cresceus trotted an exhibition mile in 2:07 at Dallas, 
Texas, on New Year's Day. This is the fastest mile 
ever trotted in January, and shows what a wonderful 
horse Cresceus is to keep in form as ho does. 



When John Mackay of Rancho del Paso was in 
England a few months ago ho purchased nine big 
draft stallions for the Haggin ranch. They are said 
to be a fine lot of horses by those who have seen them. 



The Wilkes-Electionecr-Nutwood combination of 
blood lines is now the most popular one in a trotting 
pedigree that can be named, and it will be more popu- 
lar a few years hence than at present. — Am. Horse 
Breeder. 



Henry Hellman will have threo good horses in the 
stud at Portland, Ore., this year. They are Hoodie 
2:12$ by Stranger, Ore Guy, a four year old by Oro 
Wilkes, and Alton B., a son of Altamont. They rep- 
resent three great strains of trotting blood. 



Every district association can afford to give one or 
two large purses or stakes for the slow class trotters 
and pacer9 each year. Nothing will do more to en- 
courage horse breeding, and induce trainers to visit 
the district meetings with their entire strings. 



Geo. Warlow's stallion Athadon, record 2:27 as a 
yearling, and sire of Sue 2:12}, Listerine 2:13 j and 
others, should get a large patronage this year. Ho is 
a grandson of Onward, the greatest living sire, and bis 
dam has produced four in the list including Athanio 
2:10. 

Electrite 2:28J, is now credited with fifty-three per- 
formers, which is a large muster roll for a stallion only 
thirteen years old. The great majority of his got 
made records within the standard limit before five 
years of age, showing they race and get tho money 
early. 



On Thursday January .'10th, the Palo Alto Stock 
Farm will sell about forty head of standard bred trot- 
ting broodmares stinted to Mendocino 2:I9A, Altvo 
2:181, Azmoor 2:20$. The sale will take place at Wm. 
G. Layng's Occidental Horse Exchange in this city. 
Further particulars next week. 



Silver Bow 2:10 has gone to Ohio to bo a companion 
in the stud to the champion Croscous 2:20J, but there 
is a son of his at San Joso that can represent the Mc- 
Gregor family with credit. This is Silver Arrow, 
owned by J. W. Gordon. Silver Arrow's dam is Nut- 
wood Weeks, dam of Ethel Downs 2:10 and Henry 
Nutwood 2:29, and his grandam was a daughter of 
Williamson's Belmont. He is a great individual and a 
fast trotter. 

In response to an inquiry as to tho age of tho great 
Diablo pacer, Sir Albert S. 2:08$, wo will state that 
his breeder and owner, Mr. William G. Layng of this 
city, says that the horse was foaled June 24th, 1890, 
consequently he was a five year old when making his 
campaign of six winning races and eighteen unbeaten 
heats in 1901. He is now one of tho best six year old 
geldings in America. 



Pat Foley has a grandly bred son of McKinnoy 2:11] 
that be will stand for public service at Hock rid go' S'.ock 
Farm, near Oakland, this year. He is out of tho reg- 
istered mare Igo by Antevolo. second dam Daisy May 
by Nutwood, third dam by AbdaUah 1"). This is a 
great combination of blood and Mondesol is a fine 
Individ ual. 

There not being a quorum present at the mooting of 
the Pacific District Board of Appeals called for tho 
27th inst.. tho meeting was postponed to Thursday 
afternoon, January 21st, at 2 o'clock. Tho date being 
fixed for that time to permit the hearing of protests 
that were presented at tho meeting and allow notices 
to be sent to parties interested fifteon days prior to 
hearing of tho cases. 

Millard Sanders is at Pleasanton with quite a string 
of horses from the Santa Rosa Stock Farm. He has 
Dolly Dillon 2:07 and Bonsilene 2:14.1, besides a number 
of two and three year olds. Bonsilene has raised a 
foal during her retirement and if no accident happens 
her should get a record this year close to that of Dolly 
Dillon. Some of tho young colts and fillies are very 
promising and in Mr. Sander's able hands can be ex- 
pec' ed to develop great speed. 



Since Horace W. Wilson has been connected with 
the Kentucky Breeders Association as secretary and 
manager a debt, of $10,000 has been liquidated, some- 
thing like $15,000 expended in improvements, and the 
association last fall held tho most successful meeting 
ever held in the Blue Grass region. The directors of 
the association have just voted to renew tho Kentucky 
Futurity of $21,000, and early in tho spring several new 
stables will be erected on tho grounds of the association 
to provide more accommodations for horses in training. 



Mr. J. C. Bray, of Butte, Montana, has purchased 
from It. E. doB. Lopez, of the Merriwa Stock Farm. 
Pleasanton, a pair of bay mares by James Madison 
2:1 7:| that make one of the best matched teams ever 
sold in this State. One has worked a mile in 2:28, the 
other in 2:.'!."), and they can polo together in 2:40. 
They are both bays, very handsome and stand lii.l or 
a little over. They require no boots and aro perfectly 
gaited. Mr. Bray made tho purchase for Mr. .lames 
Talbot, a banker of Butte. 



The pacing mare, Edith W. 2:00{, of the Whitley 
stable, of Indiana, is another pacer of whom great 
things are predicted for next soason. "It is more than 
likely," says an expert, "that she will be able to lower 
the record for pacing mares of 2:04J, at present held 
jointly by Lady of tho Manor and Mazette. " A pecu- 
liarity of Edith W. is that she dislikes to go back the 
wrong way of the track. When she is turned at tho 
wire and started back up the stretch considerable 
patience and urging are required by driver Turner to 
persuade her to go back. 

Dialect is tho name of a very handsome son of Diablo 
2:09] that is owned by that well known horse breeder 
and champion mule dealer, S. H.Crane, of Turlock. 
Dialect is six years old, a square trotter and just about 
as perfect an individual as one would wish to see. His 
dam, the mare Elect ress by Richard's Elector, is a 
producer of standard speed and is out of old Sugar- 
plum, a thoroughbred mare by Lodi, that won running 
races in 1:45 and trotting races in 2:50 years ago. 
Dialect was bred to a few mares as a threo year old, 
and tho foals are magnificent individuals. 



Mr. A. F. Hooker, the loading dealer in mules in 
this State, has about four hundrod head of unbroken 
mules for sale or trade at tho Parker Ranch, Lock ford, 
San Joaquin county. These mules are an extra good 
lot and are from three to eight years old, weighing 
from 900 to 1300 pounds. During tho year - just passed, 
Mr. Hooker has shipped 2100 mules out of this State, 
the majoi ity of which have gone to tho British army 
in South Africa. Mr. Hooker recently purchased a 
lot of yearlings and two year old mules in Shasta 
county that are about as good a lot as wore over raised 
in the State. 

Denver is to havo one of the greatest meetings over 
held in June and July, 1902. The meeting will open 
June 21st and close July 5th at Overland Park. Mr. 
Ed win Cay lord states that this change in tho date to a 
later period than has heretofore been tho rule has 
been made In deferenoo to the wishes of horsemen, 
who have generally considered the former Denver 
dates a little early. It is Mr. Gaylord's desire to make 
the Denver meeting one of tho best held in America, 
and when tho program is announced the many now 
attractions to be offered will no doubt moot tho enthu- 
siastic endorsement of horsemen all over tho country. 



While in San Francisco on Now Year's Day General 
Superintendent F. W. Covey of Palo Alto, stated to a 
reporter that all of the stock of this noted breeding 
establishment will soon pass under the hammer. In 
this city on January 30th a number of broodmares 
will bo sold. At Cleveland, on May 30th, the three 
year olds, two jear olds and yearlings aro to go to the 
highest bidders. During tho Sacramento State Fair 
horses of all grades will be sold, and during the month 
of November the stallions and broodmares with colts 
aro to be led into tho ring at New York. Among tho 
stallions are Monbells, Mendocino, Nazoto and Azmoor. 



W. II. Bradford and A r es Walters of La Grande, 
Or., arrived at Irvington track last week with a car- 
load of horses, which they will put into training. 
They havo Lady Le Grande, two year old Ally by Cho- 
halis, out of Codicil, dam of Lady Mack 2:2.'!. Leona 
2:28; Nancy Codi 2:25.1 by Administrator; three year 
old gelding by Chchalis, out of Nancy K. by Lemont; 
threo year old filly by Baymont, dam by Doadsbot: 
Col. Ott, five year old gelding by Del Norto. The 
above aro owned by J. W. Seribor. Yearling colt Brad 
H. by Meteor 2:171. out of the dam of Estella 2: 1 7| ; 
Duke of Walstoin 2:2.')', by Walstein; two year old 
runner and a yearling runner. — I'orlhiwl Rural Spirit. 



Tho Gilroy Gazetti says: Work is progressing rapidly 
at tho race track in preparation for the reception of 
tho Sprockets horses, which will bo hero in the next 
two weeks. Twenty-two head of royally bred young- 
sters from the Aptos stock farm will be taken in hand 
and given such work as will transform them into 
trotters for tho Grand Circuit, for they will be sold at 
tho Dine Ribbon sale at Cleveland, in May. 



It is reported from Cleveland that several handsome 
offers havo recently been made for John A. McKerron. 
Early last fall two Clevelanders offered to write checks 
for $25,000 apiece in purchase of the stallion, and when 
it was refused each offered to increase lm offer $2000, 
making $54000 that was offered. While McKerron 
will be trained for the Boston cup race, it has been 
practically decided that after that race he will be 
startod in a few stake races for trotters eligible to the 
2:10 class — Chicago Horseman. 



W. J. East of Fortuna, Humboldt county, has re- 
cently purchased the handsome and well bred stallion, 
Cassiar by Soudan, son of Sultan. The dam of Cassiar 
is Carrie Malone by Stoinway out of Katie G. by Elec- 
tioneer, therefore full sisV r to Klatawah 2:05.',, ('has. 
Dei by 2:20. II. (' Covey 2:25 and Steincer 2:291, and 
other noted horse«. Cassiar is a comparatively young 
stallion having been foaled in 1892, and should prove 
a very successful horse when bred to the Poscora Ilay- 
ward, Waldstein and Ira mares in Humboldt county. 



The Spirit of the West, published at Des Moines, 
Iowa, has the following in regard to a sale recently 
made by Tom James who will arrive at San Jose soon 
with his stallion Harondale 2:1 1 ', : "Tom James of this 
city, recently sold to P. C. Ken y OH of tho Kenyon 
Printing Co.. tho two year old stallion colt, Haron 
Cadmus, by Harondale 2:1 1 \, out of Belle P. (dam of 
Alpha Panic 2:20), by Robert Bonner 270. Haron 
Cadmus is a great show COlt He has speed, style and 
action and will mature into a horso 16} hands and 
weighs over 1200 pounds as a two year old, anil he 
shows great quality and when bitched to a cart shows 
that he will learn to trot fast. He is well bred and 
with his size, stylo and finish, should produce high 
class colts that will command top prices as speedy 
drivers and good actors. Mr. Kenyon expects to [dace 
Haron Cadmus in tho stud in the spring in somo locality 
where there are a number of good marcs." 



Tho death of Trinket 2:14 removes the last of tho 
great trotters of the 80's, unless exception bo made for 
the famous Jay-Eye-See. At tho time of her death 
she was owned by A G. Gusbee, of the Dorchester 
Driving Club, of Boston, and she was buried on his 
farm. Foaled in 1875, Trinket became noted in 1S79, 
when she placed the four year old record at 2:19$. 
Ill 1881 she. took a. mark of 2:11, which grave her the 
right to share the queen's crown with Goldsmith Maid. 
In hor palmy days she was in General Turner's stable 
and did much to make him what he is to-day, one of 
tho wealthiest professional trainers. Two years ago 
the ( leneral saw the old mare at Readville and patting 
hor on tho neck, said: "Old girl, you wore good to the 
Turner family." What a really great trotter she was 
is well known by tho mile she trotted when 24 years 
old at Readville. It was in 2:20.], and was a remark- 
able performa Trinket, was once owned by the 

late W. Hobart, who bred her to Stamboul. 



It is well known that the theory of developed siros 
has receivod its hardest knocks from Mr. Hamlin, says 
a writer in the Buffalo Horse World. Mambrino King 
never was raced and yot bis progeny was the games t 
of the game. Dictator, the full brother of Dexter, is 
another example of tho undeveloped sire. Of course, 
George Wilkes, tho greatest of all trotting sires, was 
raced. But George Wilkes was never a colt wonder. 
Hiram Woodruff had another theory that a colt 
should not be given oats until threo years old, and 
somo of thoso who knew the great horseman say that 
ho claimed that if a horso was never fed oats until sis 
years old ho would bo much better off. Woodruff pre- 
dicted that tho day would come when there would be 
colt wonders and declared that staying power would 
bo lost when this took placo. It can be seen that 
modern tr >Hing horsemen aro simply correcting evils 
which old time trainers declared would be tho result of 
early development. In tho old days the distance was 
long'or and tho tracks slower. But tho horses lasted 
for years and seldom wont lamo. Fewer and harder 
races wore given. 

As a matter of curiosity, here is tho itinerary of 
Cresceus for tho season: July 18, Detroit, Mich., won 
free for all, time 2:06}, 2:05; July 20, Cleveland, Ohio, 
exhibition, time 2:02ij; August 2, Columbus, Ohio, ex- 
hibition, time 2:02',; August 15, Brighton Heaeh, Coney 
Island, won match with Tho Abbot, time 2:03}, 2:00',, 
and trotted exhibition third beat in 2:05; August 22, 
Headville (Boston). Mass . won free for all. time 2:07 1, 
24)6; August .'10, Providence, R. L, exhibition, time 
2:05: September 21, Headville, Mass., won match with 
The Abbot, time 2:101, 2:09.1, 2:07 : |; September 20, 
Philadelphia, exhibition, time 2:0 1', ; October 3, Balti- 
more, Ma., exhibition, time 2:05}; Octoberll, Toledo, 
Ohio, exhibition, time 2:09$ to Bulky, 2:12 to wagon; 
October 17, Columbus, Ohio, exhibition, time 2:05}; 
October 27, Kansas City, Mo., exhibition, time 2:091; 
October 31, Minneapolis, Minn., exhibition, time 2:05}; 
November 6, Des Moines, Iowa, exhibition, no time on 
account of rain; November 9, St. Louis, Mo., ex- 
hibition, time 2:07; November 15, Denver, Col., ex- 
hibition, time 2:08; November 21, Pueblo, Col., ex- 
hibition, time 2:10:,'; November 28, Sacramento, Cal., 
rain prevented his appearance, though he was on the 
ground; December 14, Los Angeles, Cal., exhibition, 
time 2:071: December 19, Tucson, Ariz., exhibition, 
timo not reported; Christmas and Now Year's dates at 
Albuquerque, N. M., and Dallas, Texas. At Dallas he 
trotted in 2:07. _____ 

Sober up on Jackson's Napa Soda. 



6 



[January 4, 1802 



THE WEEKLY 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

P. W. KELLEY, Proprietor. 

Turf and Sporting Authority of the Pacific Coast. 

— OFFICE — 

36 GEARY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

P. O. BOX 2300. 



Terms— Oue Tear »3, Six Months 81.75, Three Months »1 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Money should be sent by postal order, draft or by registered letter 
addressed to F. W. Kei.i.ey, 36 Geary St., San Francisco. Cal. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's name and 
address, not necessarily for publication, but as a private guarantee 
of good faith. 

G. G. TUKRI £ CO., Agents. Subscription and advertising. 

Salisbury Iiuilriing, Melbourne, Australia 



San Francisco, Saturday, January 4, 1902. 



A NEW YEAR RESOLUTION that should be 
*■ made by every organization in California that 
proposes giving a harness race meeting in 1902 is one 
that would prohibit bookmaking on the results of 
trotting or pacing contests. The wonderful success of 
the driving clubs throughout the United Statesduring 
the past few years has demonstrated beyond all possible 
Joubt that the American people are admirers of the 
American trotter, and are lovers of the sport of racing 
without the heretofore considered necessary adjunct 
of gambling. Thousands of people in Boston, New 
York, Cleveland, Chicago and Los Angeles regularly 
attend the matinee contests where no purses are offered 
and no opportunity for gambling in any form exists, 
while a very large number of men with means have 
shown their willingn ss to pay more for a horse for 
matinee purposes than any other person would pay for 
ono to gamble with. It is true that gambling has run 
rife in this country for several years past, and that 
tho desiro to get something for nothing has a strong 
hold upon a very large proportion of its citizens. It 
is also true, however, that the bone and sinew of the 
nation, the men and women who have built up the 
homes and are rearing the future citizens of tho repub- 
lic, are not inoculated with the gambling virus, but 
are believers in the good old doctrine of paying a fair 
price for the luxuries as well as the necessaries of life. 
They believe that the prizes won by effort are worth 
more to the winner and have a better effect upon tho 
future than the prizes won by chance. During the 
past few years, ever since the introduction in California 
of syndicate bookmaking at our State and District 
fairs, there has been a falling off in the attendance at 
these annual functions, of tho farmers, tho business 
men, the manufacturer, the mechanics and the laborers 
and their families. The attendance of sports, gam- 
blers, touts and such like has increased, until at some 
of the fairs and race meetings held there has been but 
the very slightest interest taken by those who in 
former years made the fairs successful by their attend- 
ance, their endorsement and their exhibits. The evij 
has been wrought by tho gamblers, and to get the 
fairs back to tho former high standard it will be nec- 
essary to get rid of the faking crowd that has pushed 
itself into such a conspicuous place during late years. 
Tho first thing to do is to abolish the syndicate book 
and all other books at the State and District Fairs. 
And the second step is to cater to the farmers, the 
stock breeders, the manufacturers and the artisans of 
California than to the class that live by the turn of the 
wheel or the fall of the die. If every district board of 
agriculture in California could meet early in this new 
year, announce dates and programs for fairs and pub. 
lish tho statement that no bookmaking would be per- 
mitted on its grounds, there would be such a revival 
of exhibits of stock and entries to the speed contests 
as would astonish those who believe that the district 
fair has seen its best days. It would bring prosperity 
to associations that have been in obscurity for years, 
and would inaugurate a new era in California District 
fairs. 

TEN STAKES offered by the new Memphis Jockey 
Club will close Tuesday next, January 7th. Eight 
are for the spring meeting of 1902, and the other two 
are tho Tennessee Derby and Tennessee Oaks for 1903. 
The stakes to bo run at tho spring meoting this year 
are the Gaston Hotel, for colts and geldings, foals of 
190C, four furlongs, which has $1000 added; tho Ardelle, 
for filly foals of 1900, four furlongs, $1000 added; the 
Memphis, for two year olds, five furlongs, $1000 added; 
tho Hotel Gayoso, for three year olds, one mile, $1000 
added; the Montgomery Handicap, for throe year and 
upward, ono mile and a sixteenth, $2000 added; the 
Peabody Hotel Handi2ap, for three year olds and up- 
ward, one mile and an eighth, $1000 added; the 
Tennessee Brewing Stakes, selling, for three year olds 



and upward, seven furlongs, $1000added, and theCotton 
Steeplechase Stakes, a handicap for three year olds 
and upward, distance about two miles, to which $1000 
is added. The Tennessee Derby has $3000 added and 
the Oaks $1500. Montgomery Park, Memphis, where 
these races will be run is one of tho best appointed 
tracks in the South and the meetings of the New Mem 
phis Jockey Club are very popular with horsemen" 
The program of overnight events for the spring meet, 
ing will contain many attractive races, and all those 
who contemplate racing over East this year should 
enter in these stakes at Memphis by Tuesday next. 
Entry blanks can be had at this office. 



pUINCE ANSEL, two year old record of 2:20A, son 
' of Dexter Prince and Wood flower by Ansel, has 
been leased from his owner, Alex Brown of Walnut 
Grove Stock Farm, by the well known horseman, C. 
C. Crippen, and will be taken to Menlo Park for the 
season of 1902. Prince Ansel will stand at $40 the sea" 
son and should be liberally patronized as besides being 
a tine individual and very fast his bloodlines are those 
that have made Palo Alto farm famous. His sire has 
fifty-three in 2:30, headed by the great mare Eleata 
2:085, the greatest money winner on tho Eastern Grand 
Circuit this year. His dam Wood flower held the 
world's two year old record of 2:21 in 1881, and is also 
the dam of Soylex 2:15ij, and is by Ansel, son of Elec 
tioneer and the thoroughbred mare Annette. Ansel 
has produced eight trotters and one pacer with stand- 
ard records, has two producing sons and four or five 
producing daughters. The second dam of Prince 
Ansel, that old time race mare Mayflower 2:301 by St. 
Clair, is also a great broodmare, being the dam of 
Manzanita 2:1(5 that held tho champion four year old 
record in 188ti. Mayflower is the grandam of nine 
standard performers. 



WASHINGTON PARK CLUB at Chicago gives 
annually one of tho greatest meetings held in 
the world. It conducts its racing in a manner that 
calls forth praise from horsemen and from the public, 
and its Derby Day is undoubtedly the greatest racing 
event in America, and more peoplo witness that race 
than any other. On Wednesday, January 15th, seven- 
teen rich stakes ranging from $2000 added money to 
the $20,000 added money for the American Derby, will 
close. There are four stakes for three year olds, six 
for horses three years old and upward, and seven for 
two year, olds. The meeting will begin Saturday, June 
21st, and close Saturday, July 20th. Thousands of 
people visit Chicago on Derby Day each year from all 
parts of the world for the sole purpose of seeing this 
great race, which is America's one great racing classic. 
That the meeting this year shall outclass all previous 
ones is the aim of the management and thero is no 
doubt but that it will be accomplished. Every horse- 
man who owns a good three year old should have an 
entry in the American Derby. 



MR. EDWARD LANNIGAN has issued a very 
handsome stallion announcement for the thor- 
oughbred stallion Rubicon. The statistical matter 
was compiled by Ralph H. Tozer. Typographically, 
it is a work of art and in it he shows that Rubicon 
during his turf record from 1893 to 1899 won $39,890 
and that he is one of the best bred stallions standing 
for public service on this Coast. He will make the 
season of 1902 at the Brentwood Stock Farm. 



TANFORAN TRACK with '-all the appurtenances 
thereunto belonging" is now the sole property of 
the New California Jockey Club, the sum of $82,000 in 
cash having been paid the South San Francisco Im- 
provement Company for its interest in the grounds. 
Under the agreement entered into by the San Fran- 
cisco Jockey Club, racing was required at Tanforan at 
least thirty days in each year, and the new club, not 
being willing to be bound by such terms, has pur- 
chased the property outright and can race there or 
close the track as it may see fit. 



HOOF BEATS. 

J. A. Edmunds of Los Angeles, claims the name of 
Bobs for a bay two year old colt by Bob Mason out of 
Lydia Payne. 

Walter Maben is training a two year old by Monterey 
2:09J out of Juliet D. 2:13* by McKinney that is said to 
be one of the fastest youngsters in Southern California. 

The Empire track at New York, which was built by 
the late Corporation Counsel Clark for a trotting 
track, was sold by auction on the 20th of last month 
to Frank Farrell, of that city, for $218,000, which is 
about half its cost. The mortgage on the track at the 
time of the sale was $195,000. Whether trotting meet- 
ings will bo givon there or whether the track will be 
turned over to the runners is problematical. 



Among the mares from Palo Alto Stock Farm sold 
at one of tho farm's sales at Los Angeles a few years 
ago was one by Electricity that was afterwards bred 
to McKinney and the colt, which has been named 
Elsctric Mac, is a trotter if there is one in that part of 
California. 

Many reports aro out in regard to glanders being 
among the horses belonging to the German Govern- 
ment that are left in this State. Every veterinary 
who is employed by a county Board of Supervisors to 
examine horses for glanders should be empowered to 
kill every horso found to be so affected, and burn its 
carcass. 



Mr. W. Griswold, manager of the Los Gatos Light 
and Fuel Company, has a two year old gelding by 
Diablo out of Nellie F. by Blue Bull Jr., second dam 
Kit Freeman by Tom Hal 3000, that is ono of the 
handsomest youngsters in Santa Clara county. He 
stands fifteen hands and three inches high, and his 
measurements in inches are as follows: (iirth 72, arm 
20, knee 12, stifle 37, hock 14, point of hip to point of 
hock 40J. 

Suit has been brought in Alameda county by Jessie 
O. Van Ness against Jerome B. Walden, Jr., adminis 
trator of the estate of J. B. Chase, deceasod, to recover 
possession cf tho stallion, imported Trentola, alleging 
that tho horse was leased from Frank Van Ness by 
Chase in 1890. As Thos. G. Jones, former superin 
tendent of the Chase 'arm claims tho horse, adminis- 
trator Walden refuses to give up possession until the 
court passes upon the ownership of the horse. 

W. G. Durfee, who is getting together a string of 
good horses at Los Angeles for the campaign of 1902, 
writes that thero has never been a time when so much 
interest was taken in harness horse affairs in that 
county as now, and that the business was never in a 
healthier condition. There is no doubt but the Los 
Angeles Driving Club has done a great deal to bring 
about this state of affairs down south, and it would be 
a good thing if thore were a few more like it in tho 
State. 



George Ramage, who for the last nine years has 
been training colts and making speed with tho colts 
and fillies of the Santa Rosa Stock Farm, has resigned 
his position and has entered the hardware business at 
Haywards, Alameda county, where ho has associated 
himself with the Ramage Hardware Company. Mr. 
Ramage, during the years of his connection with the 
Santa Rosa Stock Farm, gave the first lessons to many 
of that farm's fastest trotters, and drove quite a 
number to their records. 

Speedsires are nowadays largely measured by their 
2:10 performers, says an exchange. Brood mare sires 
aro just as amenable to this measurement. It is not so 
often that George Wilkes is referred to as a great 
brood mare sire, yet he is the sire of the dams of eight 
2:10 performers, leading all brood mare sires in this 
respe3t, and stands second only to Nutwood as a sire 
of dams of standard performers. Nutwood ties Mam- 
brino Patchen as a sire of 2:10 dams, each of them 
having seven, and leads him sharply as a sire of dams 
of standard performers. Blue Bull, Mambrino King 
and Strathmare each stand within one point of equal- 
ing Mambrino Patchen as a sire of the dams of 2:10 
performers, while Alcantara and Wilton are each but 
two points behind. 




Stipulator, 

A pacer that has attracted much attention from 
horsemen in the southern part of the State is Stipu. 
lator, whose likeness appears above. He is a black 
stallion by Titus, a full brother to Direct 2:05J. The 
dam of Stipulator is the dam of Coney 2:02. Stipu- 
lator has worked a mile in 2:11, and an offer of $2000 
has been refused for him by his owner, Mr. Wilson. 



January 4, 1902] 



7 



Broodmare Sires. Dates Allotted by the Jockey Club. 

"Columbus," the always entertaining editor of the At a meeting of the stewards of The Jockey Club 

"Western Department" in the Western Horseman pub- held in New York last week, the following dates for 

lishes the following interesting table iu the issue of the season of 1!>02 wero allotted to tho seven assoeia- 

December 27th and adds a few notes that will causo tions under the jurisdiction of the governing body, 

some breeders to scratch their heads and do a little According to tho schedule, the Metropolitan Jockey 

thinking: Club, which is building a new and elaborate institution 

"Much is being written of late of advantage to be at Jamaica, has not been recognized, 

derived from breeding a mare belonging to one of the Already upwards of $100,000 has beon expended on 

"broodmare families'' to a stallion which is a member t, ne Jamaica plant and the association was relying upon 

of that family best noted for prepotency through its getting a license for the coming year, in fact, it osti- 

sons. Formerly it was considered the proper thing to mated on being ready to give a spring meeting, 

breed a daughter of Mambrino Chief or a daughter of The track is finished and foundations have been laid 

American Star to Hambletonian 10. Later came the f or tho stands, club houses and other buildings. Tho 

Wilkes-Mambrino Patchen cross, tho Hambletonian- contracts for the stables amounted to over $100,000 

Pilot, Jr., cross, etc. From the beginning of the light a i on e. 

harness horse industry it has been customary to speak From what can be learned from some of these inter- 

of certain families as being essentially "broodmare ested, the building will be continued in the nope of 

families." but the day for such comment is certainly getting favorablo results in 1903; in fact, the work of 

past, especially in view of what the sons, grandsons, construction will be pushed faster than over so it is 

great-grandsons and great great-grandsons of Ham- said, so that in applying for a license in the spring the 

bletonian 10 are accomplishing as both sires of speed association will be in a position to present a fully 

and sires of the dams of speed. American Star mares equipped track before the Jockey Club, 

were all the rage when the writer first began the study The issuance of tho dates is unusually early, for 

of the breeding question, Out you will not find Ameri- some reason. Heretofore they have not been decided 

can Star nor a single one of his sons represented in the before January. Tho allottmont is much the same as 

following table of stallions whose daughters have pro- last year with tho exception that Saratoga is slightly 

duced ten or more 2:10 performers: favored. There will be racing at this track from 

Belmont 64 by Abdallah 15 10 August 4th to August 2!)th. 

Dr. Herr 4.50 by Mambrino Patchen 68 10 Tfa followi is the sche dule: 

Electioneer by Hambletonian 10 10 

Robert McGregor 64? by Major Edsall 211 ID SPRING MEETINGS. 

Alcantara 729 by George Wilkes 519 11 

Kentucky Prince 2470 by Clark Chief 89 11 Washington Jockey Club— Ihursday, March 29th 

Harold 413 by Hambletonian 10 12 to Saturday, April 12th. 

Dictator 113 by Hambletonian to 13 Queen's County Jockey Club— Tuesdav, April 15th 

Jay Gould 197 by Hambletonian 10 13 _,. fl M . vU1 

Mambrino Abdallah 2201 by Mambrino Patchen 58 13 *° 1 nursaay , ividy isi. 

Mambrino KiDg 1279 by Mambrino Patchen 58 13 West Chester Racing Association— Saturday, May 

Almontsiby Abdallah is M 3d to Thursday, May 22d. 

Happy Medium 4uu by Hambletonian io H Brooklyn Jockey Club— Saturday, May 24th to 

Onward 1411 by George Wilkes 519 15 „ ;j OIT T ,,„_ ,,,1 

Strathmore 508 by Hambletonian 10 16 riuay, June Utn. 

Mambrino Patchen 58 by Mambrino Chief 11 10 Coney Island Jockey Club— Saturday, June 14th to 

Blue Bull 75 by Blue Bull (Pruden's) 25 Friday, July 4th. 

George Wilkes 519 by Hambletonian io 25 Brighton Beach Racing Association— Saturday, July 

Red Wilkes .749 by George Wilkes 5.9 26 Saturday, August 2d. 

Nutwood 600 by Belmont 64 36 * ' f 

"In this table you will not find a single stallion be- Saratoga Association-Monday, August 4th to Fri- 

longing to the Bashaw, Clay, Morgan, Pilot Jr., Tom da y- August 29th. 

Hal, Legal Tender, Red Buck, Copperbottom, thor- PALL meetings. 

oughbred or other families. Aside from Blue Bull, Coney Island Jockey Club— Saturday, August 30th 

the stallions in this list all trace to Hambletonian 10 or t Saturday, September 13th. 

Mambrino Chief 11. Neither will you find American Brooklyn Jockey Club— Monday, September l;"»th to 

Star or one of his sons represented in the table, and it Saturday, October 4th. 

looks as though the Hambletonian family was about West Chester Racing Association— Monday, October 

the "whole works" in this year of our Lord 1901. i;th to Saturday, October 25th. 

• Queen's County Jockey Club — Monday, October 27th 

An Oregon Suggestion. to Saturday, November 8th. 

Washington Jockey Club — Monday, November 10th 

The North Pacific Rural Spirit, published at Port- tQ Satnrdayi November 29th. 

land, Ore., in commenting on this paper's advice to , _^ 



district association managers to get together early in 
the season, arrange circuit dates and announce early 
closing stakes, says: "One good reason held out by 
the Breeder for their early action was the fact that 
both Oregon and Washington had representatives in 
that State working in the interest of our Northern 
circuit next year. They said that the successful meet- 
ings held up here this year would induce many Cali- 
fornia horsemen to race on this circuit next season, 
unless California took the matter in hand early and 
headed them off by offering some inducement for stay- 
ing on the home circuit." 

"Now this is good alvice and we don't blame tho 
Breeder and Sportsman for trying to enthuse the 
Californians into early action, but the running game, 
coupled with syndicate book making has about ruined 
harness racing in the Golden State, and it will take 
the combined early action and earnest effort on the 
part of all the associations there to bring the sport 
back to that of former years. However, we have 
trouble of our own and we should not be too slow in 
getting our own circuit before tho horsemen. Dates 
should be arranged early in the season for the entire 
circuit. A few early closing stakes offered at each 
place on the circuit, not all for the same class, but 
adopt a kind of a step-ladder system throughout tho 
circuit. To illustrate we will say that Evorett, What- 
com, Portland, Salem, Seattle, North Yakima and 
Spokane are on the circuit in tho order named, each 
place to give two stakes, one for trotters and one for 
pacers." 

"Everett could start with a stako for 2:40 ti otters 
and one for 2:30 pacers; Whatcom 2:30 trotters, 2:25 
pacers; Portland 2:27 trottors, 2:23 pacers; Salem 2:25 
trotters, 2:20 pacers; Seattle 2:20 trotters, 2:18 pacers; 
North Yakima 2:17 trotters, 2:15 pacers; Spokane 2:15 
trotters, 2:11 pacers. This system would prevent any 
hippodrome racing that might occur should tho stakes 
be offered throughout the circuit for the same class of 
horses. No association should offer any larger stakes 
than they can afford to pay, and by all means pay 
what they offer." 



members Lexington, Memphis, Nashville and possibly 
New Orleans. Even if Terre Haute joins the new cir- 
cuit, dates will probably be arrangod so that Terre 
Haute will follow Cincinnati in order to catch all the 
big stables that will be returning west just at that 
time.— Philadelphia Item. ■ 

Zombro 2:11 Goes to Los Angeles. 

Tho great McKinney stallion, Zombro 2:11, will make 
the season of 1902 at Los Angeles. A letter from his 
owner, Geo. T. Beckers, dated at Sacramento Decem- 
ber 31st, gives this information. Mr. Beckers could 
not rosist the strongly expressed desire on tho part of 
many broeders in Los Angeles county who own high 
class and producing mares to breed them to /.ombre, 
and has decided to take him there. That Zombro will 
receive a large patronage in Southern California is 
certain. Tho breeders there are progressive men as a 
rule, and recognize in Zombro one of the highest types 
of tho American trotter ovor bred. Besides the young 
Zombros are attracting the attention of all horsemen 
on account of their great speed and uniform good 
looks. Tho first ono to start in a race won the Occi- 
dent Stake at the California State Fair of 1901, and 
there are very good chances of this stake being won 
again this year by one of Zombro's get. 

W. W. Estill, of Lexington, sent two yearlings and 
six weanlings by Adbell to the Old Glory sale. The 
former sold for an average of $725, while tho wean- 
lings brought a total of $3348, au average of $558 per 
head. 



Grand Circuit Plans For 1902. 

Plans for the Grand Circuit for 1902 are already be- 
ing discussed by the track managers, and it now looks 
as though the circuit stewards, at their meeting to be 
held in January, will have a difficult task to arrange 
the itinerary to the satisfaction of all the associations. 
A. J. Welch has already announced that he will ask to 
have the circuit open at Cincinnati instead of at De- 
troit, and it is pretty well understood that the Detroit 
people will make a strong effort to keep the position 
they have so long occupied as the opening meeting 
of the big series of races. After the question of 
opening is settled little trouble will bo encountered 
until the allotment of dates for Glens Falls is taken 
up. Last year Brighton Beach gave an independ- 
ent meeting during the week of Glens Falls G -and 
Circuit meeting, after offering tho Falls people a 
good round sum to change their dates. It is said 
that Brighton Beach will ask for a placo in tho Grand 
Circuit line this year, and unless it can bo arranged to 
comply with the request another independent meeting 
will be held there. Letting Brighton Beach in will 
cause a change of dates for Glens Falls and possibly 
for Boston, Hartford and Providence, a fact that 
will make the settlement of tho question ono of no 
little difficulty. It is said that Baltimore will also 
ask for dates in tho Grand Circuit, but, as that city 
is off tho regular route the horses will take to get 
back west, it is doubtful about favorable dates. 
Whether or not Syracuso will bo iu tho Grand Circuit 
again this year rests entirely with the Now York State 
Fair Commission. If that body holds to tho week 
beginning August 25th for holding tho State Kair, 
Syracuse will not seo the Grand Circuit performers: 
If a later date is selected, then tho Salt City will get a 
place. Cincinnati will give a second mooting lato in 
September, preceding the Terre Haute mooting, but 
it is not certain that the latter city will be in the Grand 
Circuit this year, as It is said that it may join tho pro 
posed Southern Circuit, which will have for other 



A certificate of stock of the Kentucky Trotting 
Horse Breeders Association was sold recently at forced 
sale for $85, which was considered a good price. 



Nelly A. 2:13, yearling record 2:29], is in foal to 
Adbell, yearling record 2:23, and this is said to be the 
only conjunction of the kind. 



James Butler, tho New York millionaire grocer, 
owner of tho East View Stock Farm, is coming to 
California this winter. 



Good breeding and good feeding are so closely re- 
lated that they must go together. One is useless 
without the other. 



A. T. Welch will mako an effort to have the Grand 
Circuit of 1902 begin and end at Cincinnati. 



SADDLE NOTES. 



During the season just closed six running tracks in 
New York paid a total of $128,581.50 in taxes to the 
state treasury. 

Peter B. Bradley, the Boston horseman who pur- 
chased some of the best Arabian stallions brought to 
the World's Fair of Chicago in 1893, has just sold 
twenty-five horses to be used as polo ponies. They 
are the produce of the Arabs and Western mares. 



Janesvii.i.k, Wis , Jan. 20, 1891. 
Itoi/ee Tablet Co.— Gents: I havo used your Tablets and Mud 
them entirely satisfactory as well as yery convenient foroampalgo 
purposes. Vourstruly, H. D. McKinnkv, 

Secretary Northwestern Breeders Assoclal ion. 



Like all good things, Jackson's Napa Soda hasa 
dozen counterfeits. Watch out ! 



Horse Owners Should Vse 

GOMBAULT'S 

CAUSTIC BALSAM 

The Great French Veterinary Remedy. 
A SAFE, SPEEDY & POSITIVE CURE. 

Prepared exclusively 
bv 3, K. Oomhault, ex- 
Veterinary Surgeon to 
the French (lovernment 
Stud. 




SUPERSEDES ALL CAUTERY OR FIRING. 

ImpOMiblt to produce tint/ scar ttr hhtninh. 
The safest lust Mli-tiT ever used. Takes tin' 
place of all liniments for mild or severe action. 

He ves all Hunches or Klcmislies from Horses 

or Cattle. 

As n HUMAN KEUKDT lor Rheu- 
matism, Sprains, dure Tlirunt, etc., ii 
Is Invnlualile. 

WE GUARANTEE that on,' table- 

spoonful of < ■: Ir linUiim will produce 

mure actual results Hutu a whole bottle of any 
liniment or spavin cure mixture ever made 

Kverv hottle of < ;in«ll< HuUiim sold Is 
Warranted to give latUfactlon. Pi Ice AM. no 
per hottle. Sold hv drulfirl-ts. or sent by ex- 
press, ohum'es paid, with lull directions for Its 
use. Send for descriptive circulars, testimo- 
nials, etc. Address 

THE LAWRENCE-WILLIAMS COMPANY, Cleveland, Ohio. 



f January 4, 1902 



ROD, GUN AND KENNEL. 

Km Conducted bf J. X. I)e WITT. ])M 



Coming Events. 



Hen eh Shown. 

Jan. 8. 9, 10. 1 1 — Hoosier Poultry and Kennel Association Hench 
show. Sol D. Brandt. Secretary. Logansport, Ind. 

Feb. 4. 5, 6— Rhode Island Kennel Club. Annual bench show. 
Providence, R. I. George D. Miller, Secretary. 

Fob. II, 12 13, II -Westminster Kennel Club. James Mortimer 
Superintendent, New York City. 

Feb. 26-March 1— Duquesne Kennel Club of Western Pennsyl- 
vania. F. S. Stedman, Secretary, Pittsburg, Pa. 

Field Trials. 

Dec. II— Kentucky Field Trial Club. 2nd annual trials. Glas- 
gow, Ky. Dr. F. W. Samuel. Secretary, Louisville, Ky. 

Dec. Wisconsin State Field Trial Association. Inaugural 

trials. , Wis. O. W. Gothl<e, Secretary, Grand Rapids, Wis. 

Jan. 13— Pacific Coast Field Trial Club 19th annual trials 
Santa Maria. Cal. A. Bets, Secretary, 201 Parrott Bldg, S. P., Cal 

Jan 20— United States Field Trial Club. Annual trials. Grand 
Junction, Tenu. W. S. Stafford. Secretary, Trenton, Tenn. 

Feb. 3-Alabama Field Trial Club. Fifth annual trials. Madi- 
son, Ala. T. H. Spencer, Secretary-treasurer. 

Febv. 8 -Continental Field Trial Club. Annual trials. Grand 
Junction. Tenn. Theo. Sturgis, Secretary, Greenfield Hill, Conn. 



Canker of the Ear. 



BY C. P. 

This disoaso is generally considered to be due to the 
ear becoming wet, or in popular language, "to catch- 
ing cold in the ear." In reality it is a local eczema, 
and its character differs in no wise from the other 
forms of skin lesions <o common in plethoric animals, 
excepting that when it has once advanced to the stage 
of ulceration it rarely heals without treatment, as 
eczema of the skin proper often does when the condi- 
tions of living are entirely changed. 

Eczema in the dog is very frequently retrocedent; 
that is to say, it will apparently bo completely cured 
only to break out shortly in some other part of the 
body, such as within or on the oar, or between the' 
toes, or it may even assume an entirely different form, 
such as rheumatism. 

The majority of eczemas are due to disorders of 
digestion or nutrition. This does not necessarily mean 
over or improper feeding. Sometimes these disorders 
can bo traced to deficient innervation brought about 
by a wrecking of the nervous system during an attack 
of distemper. A very rare parasitic variety is known, 
but this we will leave out of consideration. There aro 
other forms where the origin of the disorder is ob- 
scure, but tho greater number of cases can be traced 
to the old, old story — overfeeding and lack of exercise. 

Canker of tho ear has been described as an internal 
and oxtornal, tho former applying to the disease when 
existent within the hollow of the oar, the latter when 
tho flap becomes affected. This distinction is entirely 
superfluous, as they are both of the same nature, the 
difference being only a matter of location. 

One is impelled to seek to account for the marked 
tendency to eruptions on the surface of the body wit- 
nessed in tho dog. A possible explanation lies in the 
absence of sweat glands. As is well known, the sudo- 
riferous glands in animals possessed of them act as 
important excretory organs and supplement tho action 
of the kidney and bowels. If one of the latter from 
any cause should be checked in its activity, the glands 
of the skin can in largo measure come to its assistance, 
temporarily at least. Tho dog is said by some to 
"sweat at tho mouth," which really means that he 
salivates freely. Undoubtedly the system is relieved 
of a great deal of lluid matter in this manner, but it 
can hardly bo considered a true excretion as is per- 
spiration. If then the blood of a dog becomes sur- 
charged with offote material, so much so that the 
kidneys and bowels are overtaxed and unable to remove 
it, there is apparontly an attompt on the part of the 
organism to fall back on an outlet by way of the sur- 
face of the body (possibly dogs once possessed true 
sweat glands in bygone ages) The glands there not 
being developod, an inflammation results, which may 
or may not advance through various stages till ulcera- 
tion and necrosis of the parts take place. 

Ulceration is what usually happens when the ear 
becomes the seat of the inflammation, for the reason 
that the discharges do not find a free exit, but tend to 
run down into the hollow of the ear and there continue 
to act as local irritants and increase the trouble. We 
are all familiar with the instinctive attempt on the 
part off the dog Bo affectod to establish free drainage 
by shaking the diseased ear downward. 

Inflammations in or on the ear may, and generally 
do, run through tho same course that other inflamma- 
tions do. At first their is a redness, which, if dis- 
covered at this point can Decontrolled before it reaches 
the next stage, that of breaking down of the tissues of 
the part affected and the formation of matter (suppur- 
ation). 

If ft is still neglected it goes on to the intractable 
and painful condition of ulceration. Tho latter is the 
state tho ear is in in old-standing chronic cases. By 
ulceration is meant a continuation of the disease proc- 
ess past tho point when it can heal by granulation, or 
a sort of continual dying of the parts. 

Each of theso stages calls for different treatment. 

The first stage can generally bo headed off by purg- 
ing tho animal, and for this purpose epsom salts is tho 
best remedy. In fact, in any case of eczema in tho in- 
flammatory stage, opsom salts is the right drug to use. 



It acts quite briskly in the dog, but must be in a well 
preserved condition— that is t'j 6ay, must not have 
been exposed to the atmosphere. It acts by extracting 
water from the tissues, but can only abstract a certain 
amount Hence, if it has had an opportunity to ab- 
sorb moisturo from the atmosphero before being used, 
it can readily bo understood that its action will bo nil. 
Prom one to four teaspoonfuls, according to tho sizo of 
the dog, should be dissolved in an equal quantity each 
of warm ^at'jr and syrup of ginger. Tho latter pre- 
vents griping and overcomes to some extent tho bitter 
taste of the dose. This should be given as soon after 
the preparation as possible and repeated every morn- 
ing till the redness subsides. 

For local application use tho following several times 
daily (poisonous by the mouth): Equal parts of Gou- 
lard's extract of lead, laudanum and alcohol in 10 parts 
of water. 

At the suppurative stage local treatment should be 
twice daily. First pour into the ear a teaspoonful of 
peroxide of hydrogen. This makes all tho matter and 
pus effervesce and How ovor out of the hollow of tho 
ear. In two or three minutes' time ram into tho hol- 
low with the little finger as far as it will go some of 
this powder: Powdered zinz oxide, boric acid and iodol 
or iodoform, equal parts, mixed. 

We now have to consider the ulcerative stage, which 
is the stage at which difficulty is usually experienced 
owing to ignorance of what constitutes an ulcer and 
the proper way to treat it. The second stage, that of 
granulation and suppuration, neods soothing and anti- 
septic material to assist its course. It can keep on the 
right road to recovery if a little gentle help is afforded. 
Ai already explained, ulceration is a process that has 
gone too far to be guided back to the right path by 
soothing methods. It must bo regarded as a vicious 
condition and requires stimulating and wakening to 
healthy action. It is, therefore, necessary to use some 
caustic drug that will destroy the irritant portion that 
refuses to heal. For this purpose nitrate of silver may 
be used in the proportion of 1 to 100 parts of water. 
This should be poured into the ear aftor it has been 




W Felgre'i Hl'lKWA (I.uke C— Nancy Hanks). 



cleaned by tho use of the peroxide of hydrogen, as in 
the foregoing stage. Allow it to remain thore for a 
few minutes and then let the animal shako it out him- 
self. Subsequently the samo powder should be used. 

One word as to diet. Meat must on no account be 
allowed in any form whatever. 

I am satisfied that no case of canker will fail to yield 
to the above simplo treatment, at least such has always 
been my own experience. 



BARKS. 



It is just as important to the dog that his tooth bo 
kept free from accumulations of tartar as it is to hu- 
man beings. If tartar is allowed to collect, it soon 
extends into the sockets of the tooth, causes decay of 
tho samo and separates them from the teeth to the 
extent that tho latter loosen and eventually fall out, 
not to speak of tho offensive odor that it causes to 
emanate from the mouth. Hence tho toeth should be 
examined at least once in six months, and if found in 
such condition, the animal should be carried to some 
dentist or veterinarian for relief. Dogs are ticklish 
about having the mouth or jaws operated upon, so 
that, according to some of the dilletanti, it is usually 
decessary to administer a hypodermic injection of 
morphine in order to place the patient in a happy 
framo of mind. 



This is quite an anxious time for persons who own 
puppies from five to seven oreight months old. From 
now on until the open season comes again, the puppies 
must be schooled daily, if they are wanted to make 
any showing at tho opening of the season. "Yard- 
breaking" a dog is the first thing to look after, the 
puppies being taught that when their masters w ant 
them to do a thing they have got to do it. More can 
be taught a dog by gentle and kind treatment than 
by rough schooling, and once a dog has learned to 
obey readily, promptly and with a certain eagerness 
to do what ho is told, then the lesson of breaking is 
more than half over. Once out in the fields, or in tho 
woods, instinct soon teaches a dog what to do When ho 
comes across the scent that is so pleasant to his nos- 
trils. If your puppy is well under control and if he 
l.as any "bird sense" at all your task of turning him 
into "the best dog you over owned" is assured. But 
have patience with his faults, for dogs aro like 
children. 



At tho present day half of the British aristocracy 
and an army of wealthy American fanciers are giving 
their attention to dog breeding. Some specimens of 
tho canine tribe boar astounding selling prices. Mr. 
Megson, of Manchester, bought a Collie several years 
ago for '. r.mi. 1 1,, has another dog fur which he'gave 
£1300; These are some of the highest priced dogs in 
the world. 

In the Bill Sykes daysdogs were notoriously "faked." 
In tho wicked old days these fakes were practiced to 
enhance tho value of a dog, and terrible cruelties were 
inflicted. With Bulldogs, for instance, it used to be 
the custom to make them wear an instrument of tor- 
ture for tho purposo of shortening their muzzle, an 
instrument which broke the cartilage of the nose 
under pressure. 

In many of the wire-haired Terriers, the practice was 
to treat their coats with a certain solution, which 
caused the animals intense suffering, in order to make 
their coats hard. Dogs underwent the torture of hav- 
ing hairs plucked from their bodies so as to give them 
the desired appearance for winning prizes. 

Tho Prince of Wales, who has practically identified 
himself with tho economy of the dog world, instituted 
the, as yot, unwritten law forbidding the clipping of 
ears and the cutting of tails, even in tho case of 
common Terriers. 



Those owners who expect litters of puppies during 
March and April should remember that the air is liable 
to bo chilly and that cold windy weather often pre- 
vails at this time of year. They should provide a suit- 
able place for tho dam so that no wind can possibly 
penetrate where she is to bring forth her family, and 
if possible the litter should he whelped and kopt'for at 
least 24 hours where there is artificial heat, oven if it 
be beside tho range in the kitchen. After that they 
can bo removed to a place outside like a box stall in a 
stable, that has bad a kennel or a small dry goods box 
placed in it. with opening large enough for" the dam to 
go out and in. 

Remember, tho dam needs extra care now, as it is a 
great drain on her. Sho must cat enough to support 
herself and her whole family. If she will take it give 
her plenty of sweet milk to drink, but if she refuses to 
take milk, prepare her soups or any soft foods that 
she relishes. 

Remember, that it is only for a short time, say four 
to six weeks, that this extra care need be taken of her. 
and tho saving of one good pup or the general con- 
dition of her whole litter will bring enough extra 
money to pay for your trouble. 

Remember, that if you are too shiftless to give the 
dam ami her litter proper care, you have no right to 
complain if you lose half tho Utter, or if they do live, 
if they are poor, stunted specimens that nobody wants 
to buy. If they are the latter sort, don't call it "your 
luck," but your ignorance or shiftlessness. 



Whilst in the human subject thorough mastication 
of food is essential to sound digestion, such is not the 
cafe in the dog. 

In man. the cutting and grinding action of tho teeth 
reduces bulky portions taken into tho mouth to a 
state of fine division and at the same time brings about 
an admixture of the saliva, which is a highly active 
digestive fluid, in so far as it is capable of converting 
starchy matters into sugar. In addition to its digestive 
action, tno saliva functions also in a mechanical way 
by lubricating the passages to tho stomach. In tho 
dog, little, if any, mastication is performed, and well- 
meaning persons are sometimes alarmed at the appar- 
ent disregard by their pots of nature's requirements, 
which have been drummed into themselves since 
childhood. 

But physiologists havo found that tho dog's saliva 
is almost inert, and that it cannot, therefore, have any 
value as a digestive factor. Hence his saliva need 
only bo regarded as a lubricant and at times an active 
agent for tho dissemination of rabies. 

It is a simple master to ascertain the digestive capac- 
ity of any given saliva by adding a little of the same 
to a solution of starch, and shortly after making a 
chemical test for sugar, when if the saliva be active, 
sugar will be found to be present. 

To reduce his food to a size just possible to swallow, 
the dog tears it into fragments and crunches it once 
or twice with his teeth, but compared to tho particles 
wo find it most convenient to tako into tho stomach 
his are of rather large dimensions, which, however, is 
quite proper, his gullet being far more distonsible than 
ours. 

Those who are interested in thoroughbred dogs and 
can look back twenty years and seo the class of dogs 
that was then owned throughout the country, and at 
tho same time remember the class of men who were 
known as dog breeders, cannot but notice the great 
improvement, both in the dogs and the men. 

"Twenty years ago in Northern, Pastern and Cen- 
tral New York the only dog or breed of dogs that 
approached being pure bred was the Fox Hound," 
wrote a contributor to one of our Pastern contempo- 
raries. There were a few "apologies" for breeds or 
varieties. None of any sort with a pedigree. 

The peoplo would look sorrowfully at the man who 
would keep or shelter more than one dog in those 
days, more particularly out in country districts. In a 
suit brought for damages done a flock of sheep by 
dogs, we remember hearing one of the lawyers say: 
"A man moderately poor always kept one dog; a really 
poor man two dogs, and a d — d poor man three to six." 

Men of brains, men who understand human nature, 
men who loved dogs, and, in a way, understood them, 
began to write favorably of our faithful friend. They 
made him the hero or tho companion of tho hero of 
their stories, in papers, poems and books, and our 
ignorant country cousins became interested and en- 
lightened. New friends began to spring up all around 
for tho dog. Old friends who had kopt their love for 
hiin smothered, for fear of wagging tongues, began to 
fan the flame, and as an excuse for keeping and breed- 
ing dogs, ordered a pair of thoroughbreds from abroad. 

In this Way and many other ways, the breeding and 
keeping of thoroughbred dogs has progressed. These 
solid men, men of repute, soon convinced the people 



January 4, 1902J 



9 



in general that the thoroughbred dog was of use, that 
there was a breed, bred expressly for any purpose for 
which they needed a dog. That there was honor in the 
ranks of dog breeders, and by combining and forming 
laws that not only protect themselves, but buyers also, 
they have to-day made the business a recognized bus- 
iness. Now there arc many kinds of thoroughbrod dogs, 
owned by men who are proud to be known as dog 
breeders. 



The place of honor is always occupied in many dog 
shows by the stately Bloodhound, whose dignified 
demeanor seems to strike terror into the hearts of 
people uneducated in dog lore. Hero are some true 
facts about him: He is the "sleuth-hound" of news- 
paper phraseology, although many writers who use 
the term may not know that sleuth is Saxon for "track 
of a deer." He has a peculiar scent which enables bim 
to follow the trail for many miles of anybody bearing, 
or who has come into contact with, fresh-shed blood. 
But he does not track by intuitive instinct; he must 
be trained. It is a mistake to suppose that he can 
naturally track any evil doer or human blood-shedder 
by taking him to the original spot where blood has 
been spilled. In himself he is a most gentle and docile 
creature, and is specially recommended for children. 

The Mastiff is the oldest known breed in England. 
The ancient English breed was brindled yellow and 
black; he is now generally buff. Not more than a 
dozen kennels in Great Britain are now, it is claimed, 
interested in Mastiffs. ' Peter Piper" at one time the 
most famous Mastiff in the world belonged to Mr. 
Royle, who refused 1000 guineas for him. 

The Irish Wolfhound, the old historic dog of Ire- 
land, which has been found an honorable place in the 
literature of that country and has been called the in- 
separable companion and guard of the harp of Brian 
Boru, and of Erin, has been saved from total extinc- 
tion. The Irish Wolfhound Club was formed to resus- 
citate that line of dog whose original ancestor is be- 
lieved to have romped about with the first man in 
Eden. Unquestionably, the true Irish Wolfdog is the 
representative of the most ancient of the dog creation. 
It is true that the Mastiff and the Greyhound are 
represented in the Assyrian sculptures in the British 
Museum, thus proving their antiquity, but the Irish 
Wolfdog has evolved from an earlier species still. 



Otters are not looked upon in this State as animals 
that furnish any degree of sport. The trapper looks 
after them for the sake of their fur, but that is all 
there is to it. In England the sport of otter hunting 
is looked upon as something solid; and otters are 
preserved in the same way that foxes are — for the 
sake of the sport they afford in front of a pack of 
hounds. It takes but little to break a pack of hounds 
into hunting otters; some packs hunt foxes all winter, 
and otters during the summer. A start is made early 
in the day. sometimes o'clock, in order that the 
"drag" or scent left by the otter on its midnight ram- 
bles may be fresh enough for the hounds to follow. 
The hounds are taken to the side of the stream, or 
shallow, swift-running river, and urged on by the 
huntsman, spread out along the banks of the river, 
hunting up stream or down, as decided upon by the 
master of hounds. The "field," that is, the people on 
foot who accompany the hounds, for no horsemen are 
allowed, walk along briskly, watching the hounds at 
work. 

Perhaps an hour or two may be passed in this man- 
ner, four or five miles of the river being covered with- 
out a trace of an otter. On the other hand, sometimes 
a warm "drag" is struck at once, and then all is life. 
Where the otter has kept to the shore, or whore it has 
cut off a corner by crossing an open field or wood, the 
pace is brisk enough to keep "the field" running. 
Then comes a check where the otter has taken to the 
water. Right here is where old otter hounds show 
their sagacity. Plunging into the stream, they swim 
out to isolated rocks that show their heads above the 
water, sniffing at each one, occasionally lifting their 
voices when they find a trace of where the otter has 
pulled himself from the water and rested for a moment 
or two. It is a beautiful sight to see the whole pack, 
perhaps twenty or twenty-five hounds, plunge into the 
water and "hark" to the cry of some old hound whom 
they know never lies 

Finally, the otter is traced to his den or "holt." A 
small fox-terrier is put in, and if tho otter is at home, 
that fact is quickly made known by theterrier's baying 
when he has the otter cornered. Sometimes old otters, 
especially females with young put up a stiff fight and 
the terrier gets a good mauling; but generally there's 
more than one outlet to the den, and the otter slips 
quietly into the water. A view "halloa" proclaims 
he's gone away. Tip the stream he swims, or may be 
down stream, the hounds true to his line as the bubbles 
that rise to the surface from his breath, like the 
"chain" from a muskrat, give off the scent of the 
otter. Sometimes the chase goes on for over an hour; 
sometimes for three or four hours, as the otter gets 
into other dens, is traced there, and bolted again. An 
otter hunt is most exciting sport, and when the coup 
de grace is given, the otter having been "tailed" as he 
crossed some shallow place, men and hounds have 
gonerally had enough excitement for one hot day. 

DOINGS IN DOGDOM. 



The Christmas number of Man's Best Friend is a 
good one— full of interesting matter and illustrated 
with handsome half tones. Its typographical style 
and appearance is a model to bo followed. 



An amusing story is told concerning the win of W. 
Feige's English Setter Buckwa over the Eastern dog 
Oakley Hill at the last May bench show in this city. 
Oakley Hill was listed in the catalogue at $10,000. 
Buckwa, in an adjoining bench stall was listed at $75. 
When the^latter won over the $10,000 crack, his young 
owner immediately placed a "For Sale" in Buckwa's 
kennel announcing that he was for sale at the price of 
$10,001. 



Will Ryder says one of the best things that can be 
purchased in Oakland is a ticket for 'Frisco. Next to 
this good thing is the pair of Cocker Spaniels owned 
respectively by Ryder and Elvin G. Wixom; Ace of 
Spades and Duko \V. Duke is a great swimmer and 
diver and can stay under water for .'10 seconds. Aca, 
an eight months old puppy has been taught among 
other tricks, to jump up on a piano stool and pat the 
instrument with his fore feet. The dog seems to enjoy 
very much the variety of sounds he can knock out of 
the piano. 

Calendars. 

From Mr. Clarence A. Haight, tho Coast agent of 
E. I. Du Pont do Nemours & Co., of Wilmington. 
Delaware, the Brekder and Sportsman has received 
a copy of their centennial calendar. Tho coming year 
will bo the one hundredth anniversary of this great 
powder making firm's business. Enclosed around each 
calendar is an historical insert in which each quarter of 
a century is commemorated in an appropriate manner. 

Tho mills began the issuing of powder on tho Brandy- 
wine, near Wilmington, Del., January 1, 1H02. In this 
historial insert is given a brief mention of the work 
accomplished with Dupont powdor during the century 
that it has been issued. The first illustration on this 
insert refers to Perry's Victory on Lake Erie, which 
was so much of a historial event that the story was 
told on canvas that hangs in the capitol at Washing- 
ton and in the Columbus (( ).) State House, from which 
engravings have been made that appear on tho $100.00 
National bank note. 

The next illustration has reference to tho period of 
civilization. The struggle with the Indians in the 
Middle, Western and Southern States. This formed 
a large part of tho history of our country during the 
past century. 

The next illustration is a primitive coal mine sug- 
gesting the great development of the coal and mineral 
interests of the country, which were promoted largely 
by the use of DuPont powder. 

The smokeless powder feature is then taken up, 
and the growth in this since DuPont Smokeless was 
patented in 1893, is so far beyond expectations that 
during the past year, notwithstanding a heavy increase 
in the facilities for manufacture, the company was not 
able to fill their orders; however, the capacity has 
been greatly increased and in the future they expect 
to care for all the additional volume of trade that will 
come. 

The unfortunate civil strife of '01 to 'ti"> is not men- 
tioned, the Company preferring to make no mention 
of this great national misfortune. They do, however, 
find the climax of their story for the century in tha 
fact that at the battle of Santiago, when the Spanish 
fleet was destroyed, DuPont powder was exclusively 
burned in the guns, and furnished transportation to 
the shells which did such great work; perhaps this 
should be qualified slightly. Although tho Company 
had equipped the Oregon before sne loft tho Pacific 
Coast with her full quota of DuPont powder sent by 
trains from Wilmington, it is barely possible that she 
had aboard of her a remnant of powder made by the 
California Powder Company, which would not bear tho 
name "DuPont" on the cases, and it is probable that 
none of this was used. Every other ship at Santiago 
carried DuPont powder exclusively. Not a pound of 
any other make was used. 

This calendar and historical insort is sent to all 
sportsmen and dealers who desire a copy so long as 
the edition lasts, provided the parties enclose the 
amount of postage — three cents. Tho Company will 
have no extra copies for art and calendar collectors. 



The Union Metallic Cartridge Company, we are in- 
formed by Mr. E. E. Drake, their Pacific Coast man- 
ager, will not Issue a calendar for f902. Already many 
inquiries and mail requests have been received, the 
company's many friends assuming that the customary 
issuance of the annual series of elegant calendars would 
not be discontinued this year. 

County Game Laws in Force. 

The present State Game and Fish Laws are in force 
and unchanged in the following counties: 

Alameda. Monterey, Solano, 

Colusa, Santa Cruz, San Joaquin, 

Contra Costa, San Benito, Sonoma. 

Merced. 

Tho following counties have adopted ordinances in 
regard to fish and game, and which are now in force 
as follows: 

Fresno— Quail, Nov. 1 to Feb. I. 

Marin— Male deer, Aug. 1 *o Sept. 15. Quail, Oct. 15 to Jan. 15. 
Shooting on county roads or in cemeteries prohibited. The use of 
"pump" gun, repeating shotgun or anj kind of magazine shotgun 
for hunting in the county is prohibited. 

Monterey— Sea gulls and blue cranes, killing of prohibited. Use 
of guns of larger caliber than 10-gauge prohibited. 

Santa Clara-Quail, Oct. 8 to Feb. 1. 

San Mateo-Quail, Nov. 1 to Dec. 1. Rail, Oct. 15 to Nov. 15 
Shooting from boats at high tide prohibited. 



A Dubuque, la., grocer was arrested for having more 
game birds in his possession than tho law allows. The 
fine is $10 for each bird in excess of the legal number, 
each bird over twenty-five constituting a separate 
count. The informer gets $5 and tho prosecuting 
officer $5 on each count, so that if tho law is enforced 
he will have a nice little bill to settle. Not a great 
while ago a man in tho intorior of the State paid a fine 
of $700 for violation of the game law. 



Jackson's Napa Soda is sold in every city, town and 
hamlet in the State. 



CARTRIDGE AND SHELL. 



It has been estimated that during the two and ono- 
half months open season for deer in New York State 
over seven thousand deer were killed. 



The holiday number of Shooting <ntd Fishing is a 
handsomely gotten up publication.' Tho front ' cover 
illuminated design— a winter scene, the returning 
hunter with an immense bronze breasted wild turkey 
on his shoulder trudging back to camp o'er the snow- 
eovored landscape— is a sportsman's ideal, indeed. 
The reading matter and illustrations are interesting 
and appropriate. 

Representative Curtis, of Kansas, has introduced a 
bill in Congress which is destined, if passed, to provide 
for the preservation and propagation of tho bison or 
American buffalo. This bill contemplates the estab- 
lishment of a reservation of 100,000 acres of land to bo 
leased for a period of twenty years. The location of 
the preserve will be in either Lincoln or Eddy counties. 
New Mexico. Tho bill empowers the Secretary of 
State to lease. the presorvo to some compotcnt person, 
who shall take control of the range and superintend 
the breeding and raising of a herd of buffalo. 



From lato and authentic reports on the game of 
Ala- ka, it would appear that there is comparatively 
little animal life in tho frozen north outside of the 
portions that abut on tho soacoast. Game is reported 
as very scarce, whilo the hardships attending its pur- 
suit often render the game not worth the candle. A 
few bears, a few wolves, scattering grouse and such 
like, aro about all that are met with, unless a regular 
hunt is taken into tho haunts of the caribou and 
mooso. As a gamo country, Alaska seems to have 
been over-rated, and thousands of rifles that have 
gone into Alaska, particularly thoso that went with 
men bound for tho region of the Klondike, will never 
have a chance of being tried at game. The gigantic 
Alaskan grizzly is an 'object worth hunting, but he is 
not found on every hillside. 



Foxes as pots are not uncommon, but as a rule foxes 
never quite get over their constitutional fear of hu- 
man beings, but are usually shy and treacherous. 
Still, it appears they can become accustomed to a do- 
mestic life, even to rearing a litter of cubs closo to a 
human dwelling, as evidenced in the following anec- 
dote: "A litter of four cubs (foxes) about six weeks old 
are in my garden. I can see them from my windows 
playing around the hole of their den early and lato: 
sometimes in the daytime. My little boys are delighted 
with them, and aro always on the watch to see their 
funny antics, tumbling and rolling over the old vixen. 
I must now tell you the origin of the litter. The vixen 
is quite tame, having been brought up by me since she 
was a cub. She is now three years old and quite a 
pet. It is most amusing to see her play with a young 
retriever dog, even now that sho has a family — tho 
first she has had. A year since she was flirting with a 
dog fox, and perhaps it was the same that found her 
out in the season time, as I often saw pad marks 
around my house." This interesting little anecdote is 
told in an English sporting paper, and shows that 
even foxes can become more semi-domesticated. 



Can foxes climb trees? This is a question that has 
often boen asked, aud as often replied to in the affirm- 
ative. In Florida tho foxes when pursued by hounds 
will tree nine times out of ten, scaling a young pine 
tree with the agility and ease with which a common 
house cat can do the trick, writes an Eastern corre- 
spondent. The reason is not far to seek. Water is 
quite near the surface over tho whole of the peninsula, 
and consequently there is no sort of refuge in a deep 
underground don in such sandy soil. "Gophers," that 
is, land tortoises, do make shallow burrows in the soil, 
and occasionally a fox takes refuge temporarily in one 
of these gopher holes; tho refuge is merely temporary, 
for he is easily dislodged. All tho foxes in Florida are 
of the gray variety, and have long claws like a cat: 
these long claws are suppesed to bo duo to the soft and 
sandy nature of tho soil which prevents their being 
kept down to a proper length. Tho claws on dogs' 
feet, too, grow to an unconsoionablo length in Florida. 
Thus the foxes being armed with these long, almost 
prehensilo claws, they find no difficulty in climbing any 
pino tree thoy can almost grasp around, even if there 
is no branch within thirty or forty feet of tho ground. 
The "Crackors, " who do a good deal of fox hunting, 
generally dislodge them from their perches with a well 
aimed pine knot, a good supply of which are to bo 
found within easy reach all through the Florida pino 
woods. 



Tho Southern fox-hunter looks down with a sort of 
pitying disdain on his Northern brother who shoots 
foxes on runways. To a Southerner, as to an English- 
man, it seems like murder to shoot a fox. In Ken- 
tucky, Virginia, tho Carolinas, Georgia and Florida 
there is no better sport than riding behind a fast pack. 
The country is negotiable on horseback, and tho rid- 
ing is good." But take it up in Maine or in Connecti- 
cut, what chanco is there of riding to hounds? Dons 
in the rocks aro always handy, and fast hounds soon 
" hole" their fox. But lot a fox be roused from his 
bod by a slow trailing hound, tho fox will not go to 
ground unless he is absolutely obliged to do so. He 
will, on tho contrary, keep playing along a little ahead 
of tho hound. The only way to get his pelt is to lio in 
wait for him and to lot him have tho contents of your 
shotgun or rifle. To be a successful foxhuntor in tho 
North you must have just as good but not as fast 
hounds as they have in tho South, and you must know 
just as much about foxes and their ways and runways 
as tho best man in tho South. If moro Southerners, 
recounts tho same writor, would atto- d tho annual 
trials of the Worcester Fur Club or tho Brunswick 
Fur Club thero would not bo so much talk about tho 
unsportsmanlike methods of Northerners in shooting 
foxes. 



10 



[January 4, 1902 



'Taint th' Same. 



Guess my tackle is th' best— 
Rod o' steel an' fancy Hies; 

Lines that stand th' toughest test- 
Reels enough for every size; 

Yet when I a rlshin' go 
An' recall th' early fame 

Of a boy I used to know, 
'Taint th' same. 

Useter own a hickory rod- 
Hook, cork, sinker— nothin' more, 

Useter to turn th' garden sod 
After worms 'longside th' door. 

Useter angle in th' brook- 
Speckle trout aroun' me came, 

Seemed to hanker for my hook - 
'Taint th' same. 

There I'd sit an' fish an' fish, 
Starin' at th' quiet pool; 

Sit an' watch, an' wait an' wish- 
Quite forgettin' home an' school, 

Often caught a lickin', my! 
Dad was quick to place th' blame! 

Fishln' cost this youngster high- 
Taint th' same 

Fishiu', an' inventin' tales- 
Kind o' skatin' round the truth, 
Is a sport that never stales 

In th' golden days of youth. 
Got th' tackle that's th' best. 

Yet th' sport seems geltln' tame: 
What's th' tackle 'thout th' zest? 
'Taint th' same. 

— Clerelanit Plain Dealer. 



When You Begin Trout Fishing. 

Trout fishing is like the eating of olives in that a 
taste for it generally has to be acquired. The whys 
and wherefores of this fact were pretty well brought 
out the other evening when a club man, whom his 
friends address as the Judge, was informed that one of 
his fellows intended to go to the Truckee next season 
for his first experience in trouting while a guest of 
his brother, who is an expert of long standing. The 
Judge is an iconoclast, who takes a sledge hammer and 
goes at your most cherished idols with a vim that 
leaves them headless and armless. Generally you are 
offended at the time, but forgive later on, wben you 
find out that the Judge was entirely right. His friends 
were not surprised, therefore, when he began: 

"That brother's lying awake nights thinking just 
what he'll do to you. And he'll do every bit of it, too. 
You'll go to Verdi with a headful of nonsense you've 
learned out of books. You'll carry a revolver for 
possible bears, and you'll buy two new rods and every 
tly from the Bonn's Martha to the brown hackle. 

"Some morning that brother will waken you at 3:H0. 
He'll feed you a small sandwich and march you across 
two miles of rocky trail for an early start. Then the 
glorious sport will begin. 

"The bank is so badly fringed with brush that you 
will have to wade the stream. You'll find the water a 
ittle cold at first. That brother of yours will tell you 
that it will be warmer soon. Then you will find there 
are more than a million mosquitoes to every cubic yard 
of space. You can't see through thoir mass, and when 
it comes to holding your rod steady that's out of Ihe 
question, with the little devils blackening your hands 
and face and neck. You try to hold your rod and slap 
mosquitoes at the same time, making a dismal failure 
of both undertakings, until your brother produces a 
bottle which ho tells you contains "skeeterizer. " You'll 
put some of this on your face and hands, and the in- 
sects will stay away for a little while. You'll wish you 
could stay, too. You'd be willing to undergo a trans- 
migration and come to earth as a mosquito, just to got 
away from yourself and the odor of that liquid. 

"Now, you and your brother start to wade down 
stream, fishing side by side. You begin to notice that 
the flies don't work so well here as they did in the 
back yard, where you were practicing. In the first 
place the line is wet now and sticks in the guides. 
Then there is brush, and when you give your rod the 
backward swing that ought to straighten your line 
out behind you and prepare it for the forward shoot, 
you find it caught fast on a limb just a little higher 
than you are able to reach. You get it free in time 
and catch up with your brother, who has fished ahead 
and rounded the bond to a place where there is no 
brush. 

"Here you let out your line for a long cast, feeling 
sure there will be no overhanging limbs in the way 
this time. You make a frightful throw, and find the 
line wrapped about the end of your rod in a tangle 
that would tempt a saint to profanity. You start to 
unravel it. The 'skeeterizer' has evaporated and you 
swear you will not put on any more. But the insects 
are thick, and every move you make toward untangling 
the line ends in a slap. 

"Now is the time you begin to suspect that if you 
ever get home again you will eschew trouting forever. 
At last, in sheer desperation, you cut off the end of 
the line and let the tangled part go down stream by 
itself. 

"The sun is up now, and you can fool that the 
warmer water your brother told about is nearly due. 
Instead, it feels colder every minute. It has ceased 
being merely 'too cold,' and has a piercing sharpness 
which suggests that some one is cutting the muscles of 



your legs with a very, very sharp knife. Your teeth 
chatter till you lose all control over them. 

"You haven't caught a fish, of course. You've been 
too busy entangling your line for that. Your brother 
is pulling in a nice one every now and then, and you 
feel that you could stand the cold water and, maybe, 
the mosquitos if you could get a few of the beautiful 
spotted fellows. Now you reach a nice, deep hole 
under an overhanging tree. Y'ou feel sure there are 
fish there. You let your flies drift under the tree top, 
and, sure enough, a beauty rises at the blue rail on the 
end of your leader. Then you, poor fool, strike so 
hard that your line comes clear out of the water and 
catches hard and fast in the tree. Your brother tells 
you that fisherman's etiquette demands that a man 
with a line so fastened shall stand still while his com- 
panion fishes out the hole. So you stand and fight 
mosquitos while he takes the big fellow that rose to 
your fly and a couple of others. 

"You don't want to lose those flies, so you wade in 
to get them out. The water comes up above your 
waist, and the pain as of sharp knives ascends to high 
water mark. Some way you are not perfectly happv. 
Trouting does not seem to be such a charming sport 
after all. 

"When noon comes you are famished, but when you 
reach for the sandwich in your pocket you find it 
soaked into a liquid state. You want to go home, but 
you don't dare tell your brother. Cold, hungry, mos- 
quito tortured, and, worst of all, disappointed, you 
vow you will never go to a stream again. When eve- 
ning comes you would give anything for a horse and 
carriage to take you home but your brother has pro- 
vided against that, and you have to tramp home over 
the stumps, logs, brush and rocks. Then you'll swear 
that the fellows who go after trout aro a lot of faddists 
who pretend to like the sport to be in style. 

The Judge stopped talking, and, not knowing any- 
thing better to say, I asked: 

"Did you get such treatment when you began to 
fish?" 

"Exactly," he answered; "except the bunco steerer 
who took mo out capped the climax by slipping a bottle 
of white varnish in the pocket where my 'skoeterizer' 
was supposed to be. That varnish did not come off 
my face for three weeks. I'm sorry I didn't kill the 
villain that did it. Vowed I'd never fish again. But 
I did, just as you will, and I got to be a crank on the 
subject." 

Stocking Lakes With Fish. 



BY J. MAYNK BAI.TIMOKK. 

Scattered through the northern part of Stevens 
county, Washington, are a number of small, pictur- 
esque lakes. Some of these bodies aro so small as to 
scarcely merit the appellation of "lake." Keally, they 
are only ponds, or mere reservoirs. 

Nevertheless, they are not lacking in the elements 
of beauty. Without an exception these littlo sheets 
aro romantic and attractive features of the country. 
In many respects the tarns are peculiar, if not re- 
markable. 

Generally, they are located in the heart of mount, 
ains. All the environments are wild, rugged and 
titanic. Strange to say, some of the lakes are situated 
along the very crest of lofty mountain ranges, and 
enjoy an elevation of from 1000 to 2000 feet above the 
intervening valleys. Often the mountains on whose 
heads the lakes are located are isolated, and there are 
no higher points within a radius of miles. Here is 
presented a paradox. "Water will not rise higher 
than the head." This is an ancient and very true 
saying; but the puzzling question is, from whence 
comes the wators which supply these bodies? 

There is one lake which lies on the very crest of a 
mountain overlooking the Kettle river. This beautiful 
little sheet is not less than 1800 feet abovo the valley. 
There are no other mountains within a radius of 
leagues which are as high. This lake is fed by hidden 
springs. The outlet is also concealed. Its waters are 
pure, fresh and cold. Other lakes are similarly 
located. 

However, in many instances, small streams flow into 
and out from these bodies. The hugo mountains aro 
largely composed of rock, and, almost invariably, the 
lakes are hemmed about with solid and high banks of 
stone. For this reason some of the lakes cannot be 
reached without difficulty and some danger. The 
lakes are located in the north half of theColville 
Indian reservation, and the country is sparsely settled 
by the wkitos. 

There is another peculiarity about these lakes. A 
few of them contain small trout, but most of them are 
Ashless. Indians affirm that those which contain no 
fish have always been so. Still, for this, there may be 
a good reason. All these mountains are full of min- 
erals, copper, iron and lime predominating. The 
water of many of the streams and springs emptying 
into the lakes is strongly impregnated with t' ese min- 
erals. This, of course, is unwholesomo for fish. 

Opposito the town of Bossburg and a few miles 
north of the Columbia river are located three pretty 
littlo lakes. They are probably 1500 feet above the 
river, and command a magnificent sweep of landscape. 
Into and out from these lovely bodies flow small 
brooks. The waters are clear and cold and free from 
any mineral impregnation. 

Though the lakes are situated very near one an- 
other, there are no visible connections. Of course 
there may bo subterranean connections. 

So far as known the lakes have never contained any 
fish. Very recently an application was made to the 
proper department at Washington to have these three 
lakes stocked with trout. With this request the 
Government promptly complied. A few weeks ago 
about 8000 fish arrived at Bossburg and were soon set 
at liberty in those pure lakes. The number of fish 
were divided as nearly equal as possible. 

The trout came directly from some Government 



hatchery in Colorado, and arrived in excellent condi- 
tion. They were about an inch in length and very 
frisky little chaps. In a few years they will be large 
enough to grace a platter. However, the fish will be 
jealously guarded and protected by the game warden. 

Efforts are being made to have the Government sim- 
ilarly stock a number of other lakes on the reservation. 

Some ton or twelve years ago the Government 
stocked a number of large lakes through middle-east- 
ern Washington with trout, black bass, carp and 
perch. These lakes now contain almost countless 
numbers of the several species. 

This State is not exempt from the "game hog," and 
the wardens have seen to it that the close season has 
been strictly observed. During open seasons there 
have been no "records broken." The same vigilance 
will be observed by the officials regarding the lakes in 
the Colville reservation. 



From recent reports it is evident thas a good run of 
steelhead is on now in Russian river and that angling 
for these game coast stream fish will remain excellent 
until the rain will cause the river to rise and allow the 
fish to get over tho riffles and proceed up stream. 
There has not been a really good fall fishing season for 
the angler on tho river for about four years. A num- 
ber of local anglers aro at Duncan's Mills and vicinity 
at present, this contingent will bo augmented by the 
arrival of others next week. 

In past seasons the knowing anglers generally 
awaited the advent at tho river banks of Al Wilson, 
Manuel Cross and W. R. McFarland— these three 
oxports are thoroughly familiar with tho stream and 
the ways of the steelhead. Wilson was fishing there 
this week and landed a number of large fish. The 
Wilson spoons, Nos. 2, '.i and 4, the red fly and a piece 
of shrimp and the double hook baited with salmon roe 
are the lures used. 



Striped bass fishing has been somewhat dormant for 
several weeks past, but few fishermen have been forth 
trolling for the gamo and well flavored salt water fish. 
Bass are still to be caught however — last Sunday Al 
Gumming trolling in Petaluma creek landed three" well 
sized fish and a party of anglers in another boat hooked 
five bass. 



Local sportsmen have, with but few exceptions, for 
tin' past two weeks enjoyed excellent duck shooting. 
Reports from particularly tho club presorvos indicate 
that the favorable weather conditions have enabled 
shooters to get many limit bags. Two weeks ago 
spoonbills wore plentiful on the Suisuu marshes. This 
weok tho hunters havo dropped more teal than any 
other variety. At several shooting resorts on the 
Sulsun, notably the Pringle and Stowart ponds, can- 
vasback ducks are very plentiful. On the new ponds 
and water sptig are found in fairly large numbers. 
Tho best bay shore shooting has prevailed on the east- 
ern shores and arms of San Pablo bay, where tho 
hunters havo bagged hundreds of canvasback and 
bluobills. 

These two varieties of the duck family can be seen 
daily on thesurfacoof San Pablo bay and Richardson's 
bay in swarms of countless thousands. It is not an 
exaggeration to state that flocks a mile or over in 
length are to be seen at any time on these waters 
Along the Alameda marshes, inland, spoonbills, teal 
and a few widgeon are the birds most frequently found. 
Along the east bay shore these birds are supplemented 
by "cans" and bluebills. The ruddy duck, wiretail or 
spatty as they aro called, aro exceedingly plentifrl, 
very easy to shoot, and strange to say looked upon by 
most hunters as just about one peg better than a mud- 
hen. Years hence our shooters will be wiser. 

English snipe are found in many patches and have 
lately afforded much sport. 

Quail are still plentiful in many localities. Point 
Reyes and several other localities in Marin county, as 
well as the knolls and valleys in the vicinity of Niles 
canyon aro still worth visiting for a day's quail 
shooting. 



New York has a new law that California would do 
well to copy. It provides a penalty for the possession, 
for commercial purposes, of the skins or plumage of 
wild and song birds. The law would be still more 
commondable if it imposed a penalty for wearing bird 
plumage. As an evidence of tho way American birds 
are being slaughtered for tho adorrment of hats, a 
writer in the Scientific American has this to say of the 
California vulture, a first cousin to the condor of the 
Andes: 

That tho bird is destined to extinction is evident 
from the fact that every collector or curiosity dealer 
has a standing offer for all the birds and eggs they 
can get. Thirty or forty years ago thesejbirds were so 
common that it was not unusual for the Mexicans to 
catch them with a lariat, roping them after the vul- 
tures had gorged themselves with food. 

Southern California today is undoubtedly the princi- 
pal retreat for the great birds, which will bo hunted in 
the winter from peak to valley, and from one live oak 
grove to another until they, too, havo joined the 
majority. 

The disappearance of this bird can be traced to dif- 
ferent causes: First, the pot hunter, who goes forth to 
kill everything; second, the collectors, who sell their 
"game," from bluebirds to vultures, to curiosity 
dealers; third, poisoned meat sot for coyotes and bears; 
and fourth, Mexican miners in Lower California, who, 
it is said, destroy tho bird solely for the quills of their 
plumes in tho hollow part of which they deposit gold 
dust. 



The Boston Terrier bitch recently received by Wood- 
lawn Kennels, whelped three puppies Thursday night, 
two dogs and a bitch. The little "beansters" are 
strong and robust and beautifully marked. The dam 
was sent here by Geo. Bell, of Toronto, and is a good 
one. 



California favorite hot weather drink— JacksoD's 
Napa Soda. 



January 4, 1902] 



11 



H THE FARM. 



Final Results of the 
Tests. 



Pan-American 



The final figures for the six months' 
test of dairy breeds at the Pan-American 
Exposition show that the profits above 
feed costs made by the herds of the differ- 
ent breeds were as follows : 

Guernsey $330.10 

Jersey 225.44 

Ayrshire 217.68 

Holstein 210.56 

Red Polled 197.80 

Brown Swiss 183.08 

French Canadian 176 34 

Shorthorn 172 84 

Polled Jersey 169.44 

Dutch Belted 116.94 

There were five cows entered of each 
breed. The Polled Jerseys and Dutch 
Belted herds suffered under special disad- 
vantages, so that the final results do these 
breeds some injustice 

Considered from the standpoint of the 
butter-producer the important point is the 
food cost per pound of the butter produced 
by each herd. This works out as follows: 

Breed Cents 

Guernsey 9.3 

Jersey 9.4 

French Canadian 9.7 

Ayrshire 9.8 

Polled Jersey 9.8 

Red Polled 10 

Holstein 10 9 

Brown Swiss 110 

Shorthorn 12.1 

Dntch Belted 13.2 

There were great differences in the per- 
formance of the cows in eome of the 
breeds. The best Guernsey ate $29.16 
worth of food and produced 354.26 pounds 
of butter. The poorest Guernsey ate .$24.30 
worth of food and produced 214.87 pounds 
of butter. The Holstein cow that made 
the least butter of any cow of that breed 
ate more food than the best Holstein. 
The same thing was true in the Brown 
Swiss and Shorthorn herds. The Holstein 
cowa ate the most and the Shorthorns 
came next, while the Polled Jerseys ate 
the least. The Holsteins made the most 
butter of any breed, and if the value of 
the whole milk is figured instead of the 
value of the butter they made the largest 
aggregate profit. 

When the total value of butter, milk 
solids and grain in weight are all taken 
into account the amount of profit made 
by each herd is as follows : 

Holstein $273.87 

Ayrshires 242,52 

Brown Swiss 213.63 

Shorthorns 229.73 

Guernseys 208.60 

Red Polled 212 08 

Jersey 207.19 

French Canadian 191.40 

Polled Jersey 153 63 

Dutch Belted 154 94 

As in the case of the butter, the real 
merit of each herd is determined, not by 
the aggregate profit made, but the relation 
the profit bears to the food consumed. 
Taking into account the value of all the 
milk solids, including butter, and the 
gain in weight, the percentage of profits 
made by each herd upon the cost of the 
food consumed runs as follows: 

Ayrshire 173 

French Canadian 168 

Holstein 166 

Red Polled 153 

Guernseys 152 

Jerseys 150 

Brown Swiss 144 

Shorthorn 141 

Polled Jerseys 140 

Dutch Belted 117 

It will thus be seen that considered 
from the butter standpoint alone the 
Guernseys made the best showing; while 
taking everything into consideration, the 
Ayrshires came out ahead. From the 
standpoint of thedairyman who patronizes 
a creamery or cheese factory, the butter 
test is the one of principal importance. 
The test has been a notable demonstrat on 
of the superior value of the dairy breeds 
for dairy purposes. As economical butter- 



producers the Guernseys, Jerseys and 
Ayrshires have held the position in the 
front rank long assigned them. Of the 
dairy breeds of less prominence the French 
Canadians and Red Polls have demon- 
strated their rights to a high rank. For 
the production of milk, without regard to 
to butter, the Holsteins took first place, a 
position which has long been accorded 
them. 



A Satisfactory Silo. 



I see a number of inquiries about cheap 
silo construction, of which the foundation 
seems to be a stumbling block. I have a 
silo which has been in use for eight years, 
and has always kept corn silage in good 
shape. The foundation was certainly no 
bother to me. It was made as follows: 
I started on a clay bottom having first 
scooped out the top soil, leaving the inside 
basin shaped then I put in ten good-sized 
white oak posts, putting them in the 
ground over three feet and let the top 
stick out three feet. On this foundation 
I put an eight-inch sill, spiking it firmly 
to posts. Then 1 took my 2x8 twenty-foot 
wliiteoak studding and mortised them in 
the sill. The frame was 9x12% feet on 
the inside, with square corners. I nailed 
rough boards on inside of studding, and 
on these put heavy tar roofing paper. (It 
cost$l 25 per square.) Then finished the 
inside with hard pine Mooring, and 
weatherboarded the outside, as silo was 
built outside of barn. 

A few days ago I examined the posts 
and studding and found them as sound as 
the day they were pdt in, but owing to a 
tenant leaving some rotten silage in silo 
all summer, I had to put in a new lining 
for three feet up from the floor. The 
silage rotted on account of rats getting in 
and woi king on the bottom some, which 
I will remedy now by putting cement in 
bottom. The balance of lining is sound, 
and it has never had a coat of paint or 
anything else. Silage has kept well every 
year from top to bottom, corners included, 
except the instance I mentioned in regard 
to rats. The pressure on sides pushed 
them out of plumb about four or five 
inches owing to the long studding, and I 
was afraid several times it would burst, as 
I learned later that the studding should 
be put up in seven and eight-foot sections ; 
but outside of this defect and absence of 
cement on bottom, would build another 
exactly he same way, for it is cheap, easy 
to erect and keeps silage in i ood shape — 
F. W. Wilson in X. P. Farmer. 



Plant Eucalyptus Trees. 



Says the Williams Farmer: G. B. Har- 
lan is preparing the ground to plant 300 
eucalyptus trees on his place north of 
Williams. The eucalyptus is a very thrifty 
tree and will grow on any soil in the val- 
ley. They make an excellent wind break 
after a few years' growth, and when fully 
grown make the best of fuel wood. It is 
surprising that more of our farmers do 
not plant these trees, as they would greatly 
beautify the valley and enhance the value 
of every farm. In six years from now the 
question of wood will be a much more 
difficult and expensive problem than at 
the present time, and one or two acres 
planted to eucalyptus trees this winter 
would solve the question by providing an 
abundance of wood at the very door of the 
farmer. 

Farmers, fruit growers, dairymen, and 
in fact all those interested in like pur- 
suits, should receive the bulletins issued 
from time to time by the agricultural 
department of the State University. 
Write to the department at Berkeley, ask- 
ing that your name be placed on the list, 
and the bulletins will be forwarded to you 
as fast as issued. There is much valuable 
information in these repo ts and as it is 
for the benefit of the farmers they should 
take advantage of this opportunity to 
keep informed. 

Jackson's Napa Soda untangles the feet 



BOUGHT, SOLD AND EXCHANGED, 

("vN HAND NOW AT PARKER'S RANCHf 
LocUeford. San Jomiuin County 100 head o 
extra good Mules, from 3 to 8 years old, broken and 
unbroken, weighing from 900 to 1300 pounds. Ad- 
dress A. F. ROOKER.327 Sixth St., Sau Francisco. 



Fall ana Winter Styles 

IN 

Ladies' Suits, 

Cloaks, Jackets, 

Capes and Waists 

At Matchlessly Low Prices. 

J. O'BRIEN & GO. 

1H4 Market Street. 




Investigation brings Manifold satisfaction. 
Learn of the penetrating, soothing, anti- 
septic and marvelous healing power of 

VETERINARY PIXINE. 

Chronic scratches, grease heel that defied treat- 
ment for years, mud fever, hopple chafes, speed 
cracks, abscesses, inflammatory swellings, sting- 
ing, burning sores hoof rot, mange and all skin 
diseases absolutely cured, after every other known 
resource fails. Heals without scab, stimulates 
growth of hair— natural color. There exists no 
remedy so all-powerful and unfailing. It is the 
one scientific, guaranteed veterinary ointment. 
Money back if It fails. 

2oz,25c; 8 oz., 50c; 5-lb. pkg., $4 

At all Druggists and Dealers, or sent prepaid 

A. W. HITT CO. 

PACIFIC COAST AGENTS, 

519 Mission St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Troy Chemical Co., Manufacturers, Troy, N. Y. 

T. E. BOCK 

MANUFACTURER AND DEALER IN 

Harness, Saddles, Blankets, Etc. 

Horse Hoots made to order. 
Track Work a specialty. . . 
319 Ellis St , bet. Mason and Taylor, S. F. 

«tf"Telephone: Folsom 2982. 



EVERY HORSE OWNER 

Should Keep Constantly on Hand 



1 



the old reliable remedy for ripovlnn, Ringbone*, 
Curbs, Splint », clc, anil all forms of Lnnu ih hr. 
ONE BOTTLE SAVED SIOO.OO. 

Ileadlnu'lv, Manitoba, Kb. Mb, 1900. 

Dr. II. J, Kendall Co., boar Sirs: — I hail • k ■ . last summer 
that got prodded w ith a fork on the inside, of hind Ug at knee 
loint. He kept (letting w<.r-e so I tried a bottle of Kendall's Spav- 
in Cure on It. Now ho li juHtiu mil ns he was before he Rot hurt. 
Thathollloaaved mo * IOII.OO. Ycuralrul), J. E. JAMIESON. 

EndnrMrmt'iits likn thu iihovo jiro a BUflicient ^miruii- 
tee or its merits. Met 1 1 : Si« for As a liniment for 
family use it has no equal. Ask your drutftfist for 
KENDALI/S SPAVIN CUBE, also **A Treatise 
on the Horse," Hie book free, or address 

DR. B. J. KENDALL CO., EN0SBURQ FALLS, VT. 



Meet Your Friends 
at the Palace Hotel 

Tourists and Travelers who 
make the Palace their headquar- 
ters are surrounded with conve- 
niences and comforts such as are 
not obtainable in any other hotel 
in tho West. Off the court are 
the fjrill rooms, telegraph and 
telephone offices, writing- rooms, 
barber shop, billiard parlor, car- 
riage office, book stand and type- 
writer offices. 

On ono side of this immense 
hotel — tho largest in the world — 
is the wholesale and manufactur- 
ing district; on tho other thea- 
tres, retail stores, clubs, railroad 
ollices, banks and newspaper 
buildings. 

Street cars to all parts of the 
city — depots, ferries, Cliff House 
and parks — pass tho entrance. 

American Plan. European Plan 



Gain A Second 

— when your horse is fast seconds 
count on a record. 

A little stiffness or soreness in leg or IxhIv 
may lose seconds and hence lose a record. 
Chills, congestion and inflammation are the 
enemies of speed. 




Tuttles 
Elixir 



used in dilute form 
has no superior as a 
L*ed aud endorsed | e g and body wash, 
by the Adams Apply to the legs and 
Express to. tallage lightly. Ap- 

ply to the body and blanket. Removes 
stiffness and soreness, prevents colds, 
congestion, and produces flexibility 
and firmness of muscles and tendons. 

For sale at all druggists. Sample 
bottle mailed for Gc to pay postage. 

Veterinary Experience— full of valu- 
able information— 100 pages, FREE. 

TUTTLE'S ELIXIR COMPANY, 
487 O'Farrell St.. San FrnneWeo. Cat. 

Beware of all BO-oatled EllxlrB,none genuine botTuttle's 



Coast Agents 

McMURRAY'S 
Sulkies, Carts and Speed Wagons 

WHEELS TO ORDER 

FOR SULKIES AND CARTS 
at sis, I and $25 per pair. 

Phone KENNEY BICYCLE CO., 

White 81 531 Valencia St., San Francisco 

Fuel Drailit Stallions 

FOR SALE 

HI inil REGISTERED NO. 9438. Weight 
IHJUU. 1850; bred by J. D. Patterson. Oxnard, 
Cal; foaled April 18, 1898. Sire, Leopold 4250 by 
imp. Louis 3299: dam, Henrietta II 5779 by Imp. 
Montebelle 3298; second dam, imp. Lady Henri- 
etta I 2449. 

\\ \ PHI IK REGISTERED NO. 1IOI7. 
ITl/\l\VffUI^,. weight 1800; bred by J. D. Pat- 
terson, Oxnard, Cal.; foaled March 25, 1895, Sire, 
imp. Montebello 3298 by Cn-sar; dam, imp. Maria 
I 2450 by Hercules. 

These Stallions are tlrst-eliiss and their sires 
and dams are among the noted prize-winners In 
Europe. For price and furlher particulars ad- 
dress AMERICAN BEET SUGAR CO., 123 Cali- 
fornia Streot, San Francisco. 



High Class Saddle Horse 
FOR SALE. 

DAY GELDING, U YEARS OLD, ABOUT 10 
hands, weighs about 1050 lbs. Stylish, hand- 
somo, perfectly gentle and perfectly gaitcd: can 
travel all day. Call or address, CAPT. MELL- 
DORFER, San Francisco Riding School, Pacific 
svenuo, near Polk. 




JAY-EYE-SEE »5 

Mr. J. L Case, (Hickory Grove Farm, home ] 
of Jay-Eye-Sce) Racine, Wis., says: "After try- 
ing every known remedy, I removed u Large 
Bunch of two years standing from a3-yearold 
filly, with three applications of 

Quinn's Ointment. 

It la the best preparation I have ever used or heard 
of. I heartily recommend it to all Horsemen. 

We have hundreds of such testimonials. 
Price SI. OO per liackiici*. 
Ask your druggist for It. If he <l"rs not keep ll wo 
will send prepaid on receipt of price. AddreaB 

W. B. EDDY & CO., Whitehall, N. Y. 




Pp>H.«*IW»C Tahlllat^H and type written ready for framing 
■ tUl^l CC3 1 dUUIdlCU Write for prices. Breeder and 

Sportsman, 36 Geary street, San Francisco, Cal. 



12 



[January 4, 1902 



THE WASHINGTON PARK CLUB 

Chicago, Ills. 

Stakes to Close WEDNESDAY, January 15, 1902, for the 

Summer Meeting of 1902, \%*t£zZ^l:il™£* 

Overnig-ht Handicaps, $1000 and Upward. No Purses Less than $600. 



SPECIAL NOTICE. — No entry will be received for any of these .Slakes, except upon tills condit ion: That all disputes, claim- and objections arising out of the racing, or with respect to the inter 
pretation of the conditions of any Stakes, shall be decided by the Racing Stewards present or those whom they may appoint, and their decision-; upon all points shall be final. 



FOR THREE=YEAR-OLDS. 

IMF. AMERICAN DBBBT— •SO.OOO AT>r>KI>. 

A sweepstakes for Three-year-olds: $25 to accompany the 
nomination. 8225 additional to start; »20,000 added, of which $300(1 
to the second and *2000 to the third horse. A winner of a tbree- 
yearold stakes of the value of $3000 to carry 3 lbs.; of two such 
stakes or one of tSOfiO, 5 lbs ; of three or more three-year-old stakes 
of the value of $:«««) each, 7 lbs extra. Maidens allowed 7 lbs. To 
be run the lirst day of the meeting — One Mile ami a half. 

THE SHERIDAN STA K KS- S4000 ADDED. 

A sweepstakes for Three-year-olds; $10 to accompany the 
nomination, $7S additional to start; Jiooo added of which $11X10 to 
the second and frviu to the third horse. A winner of a three-year- 
old stakes of the value of $1500 to carry 3 lbs.; of two such stakes 
or one of $1000, 5 lbs ; of three or more three-year-old stakes of the 
value of $1500 (selling stakes excepted), or of one of the value of 
$7000, 7 lbs extra Maidens allowed 7 lbs —One mile awl a quarter. 

THE EXGLEWOOD ST»KES-»3O0O ADDED. 

A sweepstakes for Fillies, throe years old; $10 to accompany 
the nomination, $50 additional to start: $2000 added, of which $100 
to the second and MO to the third horse A winner of a three- 
year-old stakes of the value of $1500 to carry 3 lbs.; of two such 
Stokes, 5 lbs : of three or more such stakes, or of one of the value of 
$5000, 7 lbs. extra. Maidens allowed 7 lbs.— One mile. 

THE DBJBXEL STAKES E2000 ADDED. 

A sweepstakes for Three year olds: $10 to accompany the 
nomination, $50 additional to start; $2000 added, of which $100 to 
the second and $200 to the third horse. A winner of a three-year- 
old stakesof the value of $5000, or of three or more such slakes of 
the value of $15110 each, to carry 5 lbs. extra Non-winners of two" 
three-year-old races of the value of $1500 each allowed 3 lbs ; 
of one such race, 5 lbs.; of one of $1000, 8 lbs ; of one of $500, 12 lbs. 
Maidens allowed 17 li s — One mile. 

FOR THREE=YEAR=0LDS AND UPWARD. 

THE Mill VAV STAKES— SSOOO ADDED, 

A selling sweepstakes for Three-year-olds and upward; $10 to 
accompany the nomination, $.25 additional for naming to start; 
$2111X1 added, of which $100 to the second and $300 to the third horse. 
Weights, 5 lbs. above the scale. The winner to be sold at auction. 
Those entered to be sold for $5000 to carry full weights; if for$IO()0, 
allowed 5 lbs.: then 3 lbs for each $500 to $3000; then I lb. for each 
$100 to $JO00. Winnersof a stakes this year, after the closingof 
entries and prior to June 8th, when carrying weight for age. or 



more, not to be entered for less than $1000; after June Klh, $5000. 
Starters, with selling prices, to tie named through the entry box, 
at the usual hour of closing, the day prior to the race. More than 
two can be named l>v the same owner, but only two in the sane- 
interest can start; but the starting fees must be paid for all 
named.— Oni mile ami a furlong. 

THE AUBURN STAKES S2000 ADDED. 

A selling sweepstakes for Three-year-olds aiitl upward; $10 to 
accompany the nomination, $-.'5 additional for naming lo start; 
$2000 added, of which $100 to the second anil $200 to the third horse. 
The winner to be sold at auct'ou. Those entered to be sold fur 
$4000 to carry weight for age; for $.1000, allowed 5 lbs: then 8 lbs. 
for each $500 to $2000: then 1 lb for each $IOO to $1000. Winners of a 
slakes this year, after the closing of entries and prior to June 8th. 
when carrying weight for age. or more not to be entered for less 
than $3000; after June 8th, $4000 Starters, with selling prices lo 
be named through the entry box, at the usual hour of closing, the 
day prior to the race More than two can be named by the same 
owner, but only two in the same interest can start: but the start 
ing fees must be paid forall named om mile mi I half a furlong. 

THE OAKWOOD HANDICAP »2500 ADDED. 

A sweepstakes for Three-year olds and upward: $10 to aecom- 
panj the nomination, $50 additional to start; $2500 added, of which 
$400 to the second and $J0O to the third horse Weights te be an- 
nounced three days before the race. A winner of any race after 
the weights are posted to carry 5 lbs. extra.— One mile anil a 
furlong. 

THE GREAT WESTERN HINDU Ml' V.ooo ADDED. 

A sweepstakes for Three year olds and upward: $10 to accom- 
pany the nomination. $50 additional to start: 13060 added, of which 
$750 to the second and $250 to the third horse. Weights to be an- 
nounced three days before the race A winner of any race after 
the weights are posted to carry 5 lbs. extra —Otu milt ami a half. 

TBK VOUM; HANDICAP W'.ooo 

For Three year-olds and upward: $10 to accompany the uomi 
nation, $75 additional to start; $5000 added, of which $750 to the 
second and $350 lo the third horse. Weights to be announced 
three days before the race. A winncrof any race after tin- weights 
are posted to carry 5 lbs. extra. — One mile, one ami one-half 
furlongs. 

THE WHEELER HANDICAP 87500 ADDED, 

A sweepstakes for Three year olds and upward: $10 to accom- 
pany the nomination. $125 additional to start; $7500 added, of which 
fliN«i to the second and $500 to the third horse Weights to be an- 
nounced three days before the race. A winner of any race after 
the weights are posted tocarry S Ids. extra.— 0m tittle and a quarter. 



FOR TW0=YEAR=0LDS.. 

THE LAKESIDE ST.V K ES -S20OO ADDED. 

A sweepstakes for Fillies, two years old; $10 to accompany 
the nomination. $50 additional to start; $2ouo added, of which $400 
to the second and $200 to the third horse. A winner of a stakes of 
the value of HOOD to carry 3 lbs : of two such stakes, 5 lbs ; of three 
or more such stakes, 7 lbs. extra. Maidens allowed 5 lbs. -hire 
furlongs. 

Till; KENWOOD STAKES *'{IM»I» ADDED. 

A sweepstakes for Colts, two years old: $10 to accompanv ihe 
nomination. ISO additional to start: 14000 added, of which $400 to 
the second and $300 to the third horse. A winner of a stakes of the 
value of $1000 to carry 3 lbs ; of two such stakes 5 lb*-; of three or 
more such stakes, 7 lbs extra. Maidens allowed 5 IDS. — Fire 
furlongs. 

THE M AT WOOD s r \ li s -ft 3,00)1 ADDED 

A sweepstake's for Two year olds: $10 to accompany the nom- 
ination f.V) additional to start; $3,uoo added, of which $100 to the 
second and $300 lo the third horse. A winner of a slakes of the 
value of $l.ooo to carry 3 lbs ; of two such stakes, 5 lbs ; of three or 
more such stakes, 7 lbs. extra. Maidens allowed 5 lbs. fire fur- 
ongs. 

THE EDO KM ITER STA K ES-*i.OOO ADDED. 

A sweepstakes for Two year olds; $10 to accompany the nom- 
ination, fill additional to starl; $2,000 added, of which $100 to the 
second and $300 lo the third horse. A winner of a stakes of Ihe 
value ot $l,m»i to carry 3 lbs : of t wo such stakes, or of the Lakeside, 
Kenwood or May wood Stakes. 5 lbs ; of three or more such slakes, 
7 lbs. extra. Maidens allowed 5 lbs. Fire anil a half furlongs. 

THE oriOKSTEP ST t K ES W2.DOO ADDED. 

A sweepstakes for Two-year-olds; $10 to accompauy the nom 
iuation, $50 additional to start: $3,000 added, of which $100 to the 
second and $200 to the third horse. A winner of a stakes to carry 
3 His ; of two stakes, 5 lbs.: of three or more stakes, 7 lbs extra. 
Maidens allowed 7 lbs. Four furlongs. 

THE II V D E PARK STAKE* — •S.ftOO ADDED 

\ sweepstakes for Two year olds: $lu to accotirianv the nom 
ination, $100 additional to start; $5,0X10 added, of which $1,000 to the 
second and $500 to the third horse. A winner of a stakes of the 
valuo of $100') to carry 3 lbs : of two such stakes. 5 lbs ; of three or 
more such slakes, or of the Edgewaler Stakes, 8 lbs. extra. Maid 
ens allowed 5 lbs. Six furlongs. 

THE MKi; VIEW HANDICAP Ki.OIKI ADDED 

A sweepstakes for Two-year olds; $10 to accompany the 
nomination. $50 additional to starl; $2,000 added, of which $100 to 
t le- second and $2oo to the third horse Weights to be announced 

two days before the race s'u furlongs. 



Please note that the Entrance Fee must accompany nominations. Turfmen failing to receive entry blanks can obtain them by application to the Secretory, to whom all communications should be 
addressed, or at the otllce of the Uhkkuku ami Sim jk Ism an. 



JAMES HOWARD. Secretary, Sixty-first St. and South Park Ave., CHICAGO. 




The Fast and Game Race 
Horse 

REY DIRECT 2:10 

By Direct 2:05$, Sire of Directly 2:03}, and 

'25 others in standard time. 
Dam Vera (Dam of Rey Direct 2:10 and De 

Veras 2:11}) by Kentucky Volunteer. 

Will mal e Hie Season of 190)9 at 

EOS ANGELES 

l ER1HS FOR THIS SEASON »60 

Payable at time of service, with return privilege. 
Rey Direct is as sure a foal getter as any horse in 
America. 



For tabulated pedigree and full particulars, address 



GEO. A. DAVIS, Pleasanton. Cal. 



CALIFORNIA 



TRAIN YOUR, HORSES 

at napa track. Photo Engraving Company 



]\TO SAFER OR HETTHR TRACK IN CALI- 
^ fornia on which to work and train horses. 
Large, roomy box stalls in first class condition for 
rent at $2 per month. A reduction made in rental 
according to number of stalls taken. The best 
climate on earth. Miles of clean, dry roads to jog 
on during rainy season Transportation by car or 
boat to San Francisco. Hay and grain of best 
quality at low prices. Correspond with 

ABTH1 It II. BROWN, Napa, Cal. 



Mil. II CLASS All'l 



Uiilj loves and Mm Engraving 

Artistic Designing. 
513 Market Street, San Francisco 



Public Training Stable 

PLEASANTON RACK TRACK 

VVANTED— A few Good Horses for winter train- 
ing and developing for speed next season. 
Among the horses broken, trained and developed 
by me are Anzella 8:10m, Antrima 2:15!4, Glcnella 
(p) 2:16>4. Alexia (p) 2:18 Annigito (p) 2:21, Lady 
R. E. D. 2: 1654, etc. Best of care and handling 
assured. Terms reasonable. 

GEO. A. KELLY, Pleasanton. 




The only EnCHIUDoI 




Richelieu (afe 

Junction ! 



Market 

KtARNV 



Racing! Racing! Racing ! Sawyer House Bar, 



New California Jockey CIM 



Season 1901-1902 

OAKLAND RACE TR\CK 

Racing MONDAY, TUESDAY, WEDNESDAY 
THURSDAY, FRIDAY and SATURDAY 
RUM OK SHINE. 
Five or More Itacos Each Day. 

Races start at 2:15 p m. sharp 

Ferrv boats leave San Francisco at 12 m , 12:30, 
1:00. 1:30, 2:0(1, .1:00 p m , connecting with trains 
stopping at the entrance to the track. Last two 
cars on train reserved for ladies aud their escorts. 
No smoking. Buy your ferry tickets to Shell 
Mound. All trains viaOakland mole connect with 
San Pablo avenue electric cars at Seventh and 
Broadway, Oakland; also all trains via Alumeda 
mole connect with San Pablo avenue cars at 
Fourteenth aud Broadway, Oakland These elec- 
tric cars go direct to the track In fifteen minutes. 

Returning trains leave the track at 1:15 and 1:15 
p. m. and immediately after the last race. 

THUS H. WILLIAMS Jr., Pre*. 
CHAS F. PRICK, Soc'y and Mgr. 



J. GOLDSTEIN 

343 Third Street 

)AYS THE HIGHEST PRICES for Gentle, 
men's good Cast-oH Clothing. Give him a trial. 



BLAKE, M0FFITT & T0WNE 



1'KAI.KJU* IN 



65-67-59-61 First Street, S. P 

TKEl.rilONE MAIN 199 



Cor, Devisadero and Fulton Sts , S. I 

D. LIEGINGER, - Prop. 

1 I BADQUABTEBS FOR HORSEMEN. THE 
1 L place to stop on a drive lo the Park and CUH 
Only the best brandsof Wines, Liquors and Cigar9 

in stock 



'ONE^ONE 



Tablet 




Pint 



LINIMENT. 



LEG AND BODY WASH 

For Fevered l et-, inflamed tendons, 
sprained ankles, cracked heels and all skin 

eruptions. Will not blister or affect the kidneys 
Unexcelled as a brace. 
The most effective, ) 
The most economical > 
The most convenient ) 

One tablet furnishes more genuine WIteh Ha- 
zel than is contained in 40 gallons of the best 
extract, besides possessing other valuable in- 
gredients in its makeup. 

Put upin metal boxes in two sizes. 
Regular or $2 size contains 120 tablets. 6 
boxes for $10. small or $1 size contains 
50 tablets. 6 boxes for $5. 

Sent post-paid on receipt of price. 
BOYCE TABLET CO., TERRE HAUTE, INO 
For sale by Druggists and Dealers in Harness A Turf Goods, 



Chronic Bronchitis and Catarrh of the Bladder 

Cured in 48 Hours. 



CAPSULES 



Superior to Copaiba, Cubebs or Injection 



January 4, 1902] 



13 



New Memphis Jockey Club. 

MONTGOMERY PARK, MEMPHIS, TENN. 



10-Ten Stakes to Close January 7,1902-10 

For Spring Meeting, I902, and Tennessee Derby and Oaks for I903. 



STAKES FOR 1903. 

THE TENNESSEE DERBY FOR I 903 — SUBSCRIBED TO 

bv G C Bexnktt & Co —For foals of 19(X> (two-year-olds of l'.in-j). 
$3000 added. ( Entrance free ) For 190.3. A sweepstakes for three- 
year-olds (foals of 19(Xi). $150 each, $50 forfeit, orjlf) if declared on 
or before May 1 1902: $25 if declared on or before January 8, 1903 
All declarations void unless accorapauled by tho money. $300(1 
added, of which $700 to second, $300 to third' and fourth" to save 
stake. Weights— Colts, 122 lbs.: geldings, 119 lbs; (lilies, 1 1? lbs. 
One mile and oue-eiglitli. 

THE TENNESSEE OAKS FOR 1903— For allies (foals 
of 1900). $1500 added. (Entrance free ) For 1903. A sweepstakes 
for fillies, three-year-olds (foals of 1900). $100 each, $10 forfeit, or 
$10 if declared on or before May 1, 1902: $20 if declared on or before 
January 2. 1903 All declarations void unless accompanied bv the 
money. $1500 added, of which $1(10 to second, 8200 to third and 
fourth to save stake. Weights, 117 lbs. One mile. 

STAKES FOR 1902. 

GASTON HOTEL STAKES — SUBSCRIBED To BV GASTON'S 
Hotel —For colts and geldings (foals of 1900). $1000 added, ($10 
entrance ) For 1903. A sweepstakes for two year-olds, colts and 
geldings $10 to accompany nomination, and $50 additional to 
start. $1000 added, of which $200 to second and $10(1 to (bird, fourth 
to save starting money. Four furlongs, 

THE ARDKLLK STAKES — For fillies It'oalsof 1900), $11111(1 
added. ($10 entrance ) For 1902. A sweepstakes for two-year-old 
Allies $10 to accompany nomination, and $5'i additional to start. 
11000 added, of which $200 to second and $100 to third, fourth to save 
starting money. Four furlongs. 

THE MEMPHIS STAKES— For two-year-olds (foals of 1900). 
$1000 added. ($10 entrance. ) For 1902 A sweepstakes for two- 
year-olds $10 to accompany nomination, and $50 additional to 
start. $1000 added, of which $200 to second and $100 to third, fourth 
to save starling money 3 lbs. below the scale. PENALTY— A win- 
ner of a race of the value of $1000 to the winner. 3 lbs (selling ex- 



oepted). Allowances— Non-winners of a race of the value of $.300 

(selling race excepted, parse and stake) allowed 5 lbs ; maidens, 
10 lbs. Five furlongs. 

HOTEL GAVOSO STAKES-SUHSCHIHBD To tiv HOTEL 
GATOSO —For foals Of 1899 (three-year-olds of 1902). (1000 added. 
($10 entrance.) For 1902. A sweepstakes for three-year-olds (foals 
of IS99). $10 to accompany nomination, 150 additional to start. 
The Club to add J 1000, of which MOO to second, anil $1(10 to third, 
the fourth to save starting money. A winner of a three year-old 
slake race, when carrying their weight [colts 122, geldings 119, 
fillies 1 17J, 3 lbs. penalty: of two or more, 5 lbs ALLOWANCES— 
Beaten non-winners in 1902 allowed 5 lbs.; if unplaced, 8 lbs , others 
never having won a two or three-year-old stake race (selling stakes 
excepted), allowed 7 lbs : if such have never won a race of the 
value of $4(10 to the winner (selling stakes and purse races ex- 
cepted ), allowed 12 lbs.; beaten maidens, 20 lbs. Allowances not 
cumulative. One mile. 

p O 3 

SCALE OF THIS RACE. 2. £, — 

5> <? , w 

Those entitled to no allowance 122 119 117 

Winner with weight up of one .3 year-old stake 125 122 120 

Winner wilh weight up of two .3 year old stakes 127 121 122 

Beaten non-winners placed in 1902 117 (14 112 

Beaten non winners unplaced in 1902 114 111 109 

Non-wiunersof a 2or 3-vear old slake (ntlliiir/ < jre/ited) .115 112 III) 
Non-winnersof a race of the value of $100 " •' 110 107 105 
Beaten Maidens 102 99 97 

FOR THREE-YEAR-OLDS AND UPWARD 

THE MONTGOMERY HANDICAP. -Handicap J2000 added. 
(Entrance free ) For 1SI02. A handicap sweepstakes for three-year- 
olds and upward. $50 each, half forfeit, or $10 if declared. $2000 
added, of which $.351) to second, and $200 to third, the fourth to save 
stake. Weights to be announced before 9 A M , February 8th, and 
declarations to be made on or before February 22, 1902. All declara- 
tions void unless accompanied by tho money. Tho winner of a 



race, after the weights are announced, of the value of $500 to the 
winner, or two races of any value (sidling purse races excepted 1 ft 
lbs. penalty; such penalty not to exceed scale weight if handi 
capped at less; those weighted at scale or more than scale weight 
by the handicapper will not be subject to a penalty. The scale (o 
bo Western Jockey Club Scale. This raco to be run the opening 
day. One mile and one sixteenth. 

THE PEAltODY HOTEL HANDICAP SUBSi RIBED 
Pkabody Hotkl — Hatdicap. $1000 added. (Entrance free ) For 
1902 A handicap sweepstakes for three-year-olds and upward. 
$5(1 each, half forfeit, or $10 if declared on or before April loth 
$1000 added, ol which $200 to second. $100 to (bird, fourth to save 
stake. Weights 'to be announced (wo days before tho race Win- 
ners of a race, after the announcement of weights (selling race 
excepted), to carry 5 lbs. penalty. One mile and one-eighth, 

TENNESSEE BREWING CO STAKES Sc use k 1 111:11 to it v 
Tknnesskk FitiKWlNt; uo — Selling stakes. $1000added. (Entrance 
$10). For 1902. A selling sweepstakes for three-year-olds and up- 
ward $10 to accompany nomination, and $50 additional lo start. 
$1000 added, of which $200 to second, and $100 to third, fourth to 
save starting money. The winner to be sold at auction for $.351X1 if 
for less; 3 lbs allowed for each $500 to $20(X); then 1 lb. for each J 100 
less to $500. Starters and selling price lobe named through the 
entry-box by the usual time of closing for ibis day's racing, and 
those so named are liable for starting fee. Seven furlongs. 

THE COTTON STEEPLECHASE STAKES Steeplechasi p 
$1000 added. (Entrance free). For 1902 A steeplechase handicai 
sweepstakes for three year-olds and upward. $50 each, half forfei ' 
or $10 if declared on or before April 5th. All declarations void 
unless accompanied by the money. $1000 added, of which $200 to 
second and $l(Xi to third, the fourth to save stake. Weights to be 
announced two days before the race. Penalty— Winner of steeple- 
chase, after weights are announced, 5 lbs. extra. Four or more 
horses of entirely different interests to start, or the race may be 
declared off. Starters to be named through the entry box at usual 
time of closing the day before the race, and those named are liable 
for starting fee. About two miles. 



SPECIAL NOTIC.E. — No entry will b3 received for any of theso stakes except upon this condition: That all disputes, claims and objections arising out of tho 
racing, or with respect to the interpretation of the conditions of any stake, shall bo decided by a majority of the Executivo (lommittoo present, or those whom they 
may appoint, and their decisions upon all points shall be final. 

The Club also reserves the rig-lit to refuse the entries of any person, or the transfer of any entry, and without notice. 

THIS RACE COURSE (MONTGOMERY PARK) is, without a doubt, one of the best in America to winter and train tho thoroughbred, furnishing 
first-class and most comfortable quarters for both man and horse FREE. On this track tho majority of the good two-year-olds of the West each season are developed. 
Entry Blanks or any information on application will bo promptly furnished by tho Secretary. 

NEW MEMPHIS JOCKEY CLUB. Office, No. 2 Cotton Exchange Bui'ding. 



S. R. MONTGOMERY. President. 



M. N. MACFARLAN, Secretary, 



HOLSTEIN CATTLE. 

SLEEPY HOLLOW RANCH, SAN ANSELMO, MARIN CO., CAL. 

I OFFER FOR SALE 

Johanna 5th's PAUL OE KOL 22372 H.F. H.B. 

His dam, Johanna oth, has official record at 4 years: milk 
89.3 lbs. one day, 16,18(5.5 lbs. one year: butter, 23.50 lbs. 
one week. His sire's dam, Duchess Olothihle, has official 
record: milk, 88.6 lbs. one day, 18,046 9 lbs. one year; 
butter, 23.05 lbs. one week. He was bred by Gillett & Son 
of R )33ndale, Wis. His pedigree includes tin greatest cows 
in the world. Having a number of his daughters now in 
milk and many cows in calf to him, I let him go to make 
room for my other seven premier sires. 

For further particulars address 

R. M. HOTALING, 

431 .Jackson Street, San Francisco, Cal. 




Bonnie Direct 2:054 

World's Record for Pacers in First 
Season's Campaign. 

Winner of fastest 5-heat race paced in 1900. Win- 
ner of Chamber of Commerco Stake at Detroit: 
Blue Hill Stake at Readville, and three other 
great races. Biggest money winner of "New" 
Pacers of 1900, having $7,575 tohiseredit the lirst 
year out. 

Sired by Direct 2:05', Sire of Directly 2:03] , 
Directum Kelly 2:08 J . Etc. 

Dam BON BON 2:26 (dam of Bonsilene 2:14!*), 
by Simmons 2:28, sire of Helen Simmons 2:11)4, 
New York Central 2:13, etc. Also sire of dams of 
Owyhee 2:11, and Ferono StlOU, as a tbroe-year- 
old, and winner of last season's (1900) Kentucky 
Futurity. 

Second Dam BONNIE WILKES 2:28, by George -V ' • . , r . 1 
Wilkes 2:22. 

Third Dam BETTY VILEY, by Bob Johnson, 
thoroughbred son of Boston. 

is a black stallion, 15 •, hands high, weighs 1100 lbs. Is a good Individual, 
has best of feet and legs, and is absolutely sound in every way. 
BONNIE DIRECT will serve a limited number of approved mares during season of 1902, at ml DO 
the season, with return privilege if mare proves not with foal, and horse is alive and In my possession. 
Money due at time of service or upon removal of mare. Every care taken to prevent accidents or 
escapes, but no responsibility should any occur. Pasturago for mares at reasonable rates. 




BONNIE DIRECT 



Address 



C. L. GRIFFITH, 

PleaeantoD, Cal 



Summary of Three of Eonnie 
Direot's Races. 

Chamber of Commerce .Stakes, 16,000, at Detroit. 

Bonnie Direct » 6 nil' 

Annie Thornton M I 12 2 2 

Hal McEwen Ill 2 8 4dis 

Pussy Willow 8 3 113 3 ro 

(leorgc 0. 3 4 3 4 5 ro. Cobbelt 4 7 4 5 dr, Duchess 
1 1 18 :> « dr, Joe; Wheeler 12 9 7 7 dr. Fred Wilton 
2 2 9 dis, Mt Clemens Bov 5 « H dr, Louis K. Mid- 
dleton ti 8 12 dr, Sport 7 10 10 dr, Gamecock 10 12 
dr, Connie 13 dr, Little Frank dis. 

Timo-2:10^, 2:12M, 2:13S£, 2:13, 2:12^, 2:12J£. 

2: 13 Class, pacing, purse 11,600, ut Columbus. 

Bonnie Direct 2 5 111 

.lohnnv Agan I 1 2 2 3 

Ladv Piper 3 2 3 4 2 

Frcllmont S 3 13 4 

Red Light 4 4 5 dr, Prince Exam dis. 

Time— 0&1. l:02J£. 1:34, 8:06 W, 0:88— , 1:06*4, 1:88}*, 

2: KMC. 0:32, 1:03'/,, 1:34'/,, 2:117 '4: 0tSl%, 1:01'/,, 1:3?J£, 
2:08^: 0:31 H, l:0SMi 1:36. 2:08H- 

Blue Hill Stake, $3,000, at Readvillo. 

Bonnie Direct 1 1 1 

Sallie Hook 2 2 8 

Evolute 5 3 2 

Annie Thornton 4 4 3 

Paul Rovore 3 5 4, Dark Wilkes H 7 5, Tommy 
W. 7 8 7, Argo Director 8 8 6, Lady Allright 9 9 9, 
Beauty Spot dis, P. H. Flynn dis. 

Tlmc-2:073£, 2:09!4, 8:I0J<. 



The Auto-Carburettor 

For Gasoline Engines. 

In use on Motor Cycles, Automobiles, 
Launches, Stationary Engines 
and Flying Machines. 

You can depend upon it to remedy al 1 dllllculties 
arising from an imperfect mixture 
Write us for full information and prices. 

THE AVERY & JENNESS CO. 

S4 S. Canal St., CHICAGO, ILL, 



COCOANUT OIL CAKE 

THE BEST FEED KOK 

STOCK, CHICKENS AND PICS 

For sale In lout to BUlt by 

EL DORADO LINSEED OIL WORKS CO. 

08 California Streeb. San Franc I ><:<>, Cal. 



14 



(.January 4, 1902 




THE BAYWOOD STUD 

THE BUNGALOW, SAN MATEO, CA L. 

(Property of John Parbott, Esq.) 
Devoted Exclusively to the Breeding and Training of 

High Stepping 
Hackney-Bred 
Harness Horses 



VETERINARY. 



HERE'S AN OPPORTUNITY 

STANDARD BRED 
MARES AND FILLIES 

FROM $40 UP. 

Many of Them are Registered and Nearly All Can Be. 
Write for Prices and Particulars. 

The owner, Hon. JESSE D. CARR, Salinas, wants to sell thom immediately. 
Is not in need of the money, but is petting too old (87) to keep on breeding Horses. 
Will sell one or more and will give any one a big bargain that will take them all 
This is the bost opportunity ever offered in California to get big values for money 



Almetla C— Brown Ally, foaled January, 1893. 

Sire, Gabilan; dam, Emma. Registered in 

Vol. 13. Rule 7, as standard. Bred to Boodle Jr. 
Delight— Bay filly, foaled February 15, 1897. Sire, 

Eugineer; dam, Flossie. No marks. Bred to 

Boodle Jr. 

Bertha— Dark brown mare. Sire, Carr's Mam- 
brino; dam, Emma. Has not foaled yet. 

Belle-Black filly, foaled March 20, 1893. Sire, 
Alpheus Wilkes; dam, Lady Nelson. Bred to 
Boodle Jr. 

Trlx— Black filly, foaled April 20, 1899. Sire, Ecce; 
dam. Belle. 

Necessity— Light bay filly, foaled February 22, 
1897. Sire, Magenta: dam, Unique. 

Dora— Bay Ally, foaled April 2, 1890. Sire, Reno; 
dam, Martha. Bred to Major. 

Epha— Bay filly, foaled April 24. 1892. Sire, Eugi- 
neer; dam, Puss. Registered in Vol. XIII. 
Bred to Boodle Jr. 

Elsie— Light bay filly, foaled March 25, 1895. Sire, 
Boodle; dam, Mary C. Bred to Nutwood 
Wilkes. 

Eda— Chestnut sorrel filly, foaled April 19, 1895. 
Sire, Hambletonian Wilkes; dam, Gabilan 
Maid. Bred to Boodle Jr. 

Flossie— Brown mare. Sire, Carr's Mambrino; 
dam, Gray Eagle mare brought from Ken- 
tucky. Vol. XIII. Bred to Boodle Jr. 

Gabilan Girl— Brown filly foaled April 8, 1892. 
Sire, Gabilan; dam, Clara. Vol. XIII. Bred 
to Major 

Queen Begs-Brown filly, foaled April 3, 1900. 

Sire, Boodle Jr.; dam, Gabilan Girl. 
Little Ora— Brown filly, foaled March 17, 1897 

Sire, Eugineer; dam Lilly B. 
Jane— Bay mare. Sire, Carr's Mambrino; dam 

Ballot Box. Bred to Major 
Juanlta Bay filly, foaled March 26, 1896. Sire, 

Bay Rum; dam Lucky Girl. Bred to Boodle Jr. 
Kitty S.— Sorrel Ally, foaled April 22, 1900. Sire, 

Nutwood Wilkes; dam, Flossie. 
Flora— Bay filly, foaled February 24, 1892. Sire, 

Reno: dam. Lady Palmer. Bred to Major. 
Fanchon— Bay filly, foaled April 13, 1898. Sire, 

Ecce: dam, Jane. 
Lady Palmer— Bay mare. Sire, Carr's Mam- 
brino; first dam by Luciona, he by Whipple 

Hambletonian. Vol. XIII , Rule, 7. Bred to 

Major. 

I.lldlne- Bay filly, foaled March 28, 1894. Sire, 

Boodle; dam Gabilan Maid. Vol. XIII , Rule, 

VI. Bred to Nutwood Wilkes. 
AUegra— Bay filly, foaled April 27, 1899. Sire, 

Ecce; dam Jane. 
Martha— Bay mare. Sire, Mambrino Jr.; dam, 

Gabilan Maid. Bred to Major. 



Lilly B —Black mare (16 hands). Sire, Homer 

dam. Maggie Lee Registered as standard in 

Vol VI. Bred to Major 
Lucky Girl— Bay filly, foaled May 24, 1889 Sire, 

Carr's Mambrino; dam, Flossie. Bred to 

Boodle Jr. 

Miss Judy— Bay filly, foaled April 4, 1900. Sire, 

Boodle Jr.; dam, Jane. 
Nancy— Bay mare. Sire. Mambrino Jr.; dam, 

Gabilan Maid. Bred to Boodle Jr. 
Peerless— Bay filly, foaled April 5. 1891. Sire, 

Gabilan; dam. Jane. Bred to Major. 
Comfort— Brown filly, foaled May 25, 1898. Sire, 

Magenta; dam Janet. 
Surprise— Brown mare. Sire, Abbotsford, son of 

Woodford Mambrino; first dam. Minnie by 

Ladd's Kentucky Hunter. Bred to Boodle Jr. 
Sausal Maid— Dark brown filly, foaled January 8. 

1892. Sire, Gabilan; dam, Flossie. Vol. XIII, 

Rule VI. Bred to Boodle Jr. 
Taddie J- Sorrel filly, foaled April 2, 1896 Sire, 

Bav Rum; dam, Mary C. Bred to Boodle Jr. 
Mary C— Bay mare, foaled April 8, 1898. Sire, 

Antevolo 7648; dam, Gabilan Maid. Bred to 

Boodle Jr. 

Ruby M — Bay filly, foaled March 28, 1898. Sire, 

Ecce; dam, Flora. 
Jenny Wren— Bay filly, foaled April 21. 1900. 

Sire, Boodle Jr.; dam. Flora. 
Claire— Bay filly, foaled May 10, 1899. Sire, Punch: 

dam. Lady St. Clair 
Beatrice Golden— Chestnut sorrel filly, foaled 

April 20, 1900. Sire, Boodle Jr.: dam, Lady 

Comstock Jr. 
Ontario-Bay filly, foaled April 21, 1898. Sire, 

Magenta; dam, Lucky Girl. 
Miss Nobody— Gray filly, foaled March 26, 1897. 

Sire, Magenta: dam, Martha. 
Julia Dean— Bay Ally, foaled April 13, 1898. Sire, 

Ecce; dam, Martha. 
Pobreclta— Black Ally, foaled April 9, 1900. Sire, 

Boodle Jr.; dam, Martha. 
Helen Gould— Bay filly, foaled March 29, 1900. 

Sire, Boodlo Jr.; dam. Miss Beauty. 
Miss Nan— Dark gray filly, foaled March 6, 1897. 

Sire, Magenta; dam, Nancy. 
Delta— Dark bay filly, foaled Maich 21, 1900. Sire, 

Boodle Jr.; dam, Nancy. 
Queen Mab— Sorrel Ally, foaled April II, 1900. 

Sire, Nutwood Wilkes; dam, Nina B. 
Little Dorrlt— Gray Ally, foaled March 14, 1897. 

Sire, Magenta; dam, Rita V. 
Adelaide— Dark gray filly, foaled February 20, 

1897. Sire, Magenta, dam, Surprise. 
Evening Star— Black Ally, foaled March 28, 1898. 

Sire, Magenta; dam, Sausal Maid. 



Address JESSE D. CARR, Salinas, Cal. 



ASTHM A CUR E FREE! 

Asthmalene Brings Instant Relief and Permanent 
Cure in All Cases. 
Sent Absolutely Free on Receipt of Postal. 



f OR. ten 
EARS 



There is nothing like Asthmalene. It brings 
instant relief, even in the worst cases. It cures 
when all else fails. 

The Rev. C. F. Wells, of Villa Ridge, 111., says: "Your 
trial bottle of Asthmalene received in good condition. I can- 
not tell you how thankful I feel for the good derived from it. 
I was a slave, chained with putrid sore throat and asthma for 
ten years. I despaired of ever being cured. I saw your ad- 
vertisement for the cure of this dreadful and tormenting dis- 
ease, asthma, and thought you had overspoken yourselves, 
but resolved to give it a trial. To my astonishment the trial 
acted like a charm. Send me a full-size bottle " 

We want to send to every sufferer a trial treatment of 
Asthmalene, similar to the one that cured Mr. Wells. We'll 
send it by mail POSTPAID, ABSOLUTELY FREE OF 
CHARGE, to any sufferer who will write for it, even on a postal. Never mind, 
though you are despairing, however bad your case, Asthmalene will relieve and 
cure. The worse your case, the more glad we are to send it. Do not delay. 
Write at once, addressing DR. TAFT BROS.' MEDICINE CO., 79 East 130th St., 
N. Y. City. Sold by all ; Druggists 




Ira Barker Dalziel 

VETERINARY DENTIST 

Fancy Carriage. Saddle and Road Horses for Sale 

Office and stable: 805 Golden Gate Avenue, San 
Francisco, Cal. Telephone South 651. 



13 1*. T7\7"3Ctx, F*. DEg^Xi. 

M. R. C. V. S., F. E. V. M. S. 

VETERINARY SURGEON. 

Member of the Royal College of Veterinary 
Surgeons, England; Fellow of the Edinburg 
Veterinary Medical Society; Graduate of the New 
Veterinary College, Edinburgh; Veterinary Sur- 
geon to the S. F. Fire Department; Live Stock 
Inspector forNew Zealand and Australian Colonies 
at the port of San Francisco; Professor of Equine 
Medicine, Veterinary Surgery, Veterinary Depart- 
ment University of California: Ex-President of 
the California State Veterinary Medical Associa- 
tion; Veterinary InArmary, Rosidence and Office, 
San Francisco Veterinary Hospital. 1117 Golden 
Gate Avenue, near Webster St., San Francisco: 
Telephone West 128. 



BREEDERS' DIRECTORY. 



HOLSTEINS— Winners of every 7 days' butter 
contest at State Fair 1899 1st & 2d for aged cows, 
4-yr., 3-yr. and 2-yr.-olds; 21 Jerseys and Durhams 
competing. 5th year my Holsteins have beaten 
Jerseys for butter. Stock for sale; also pigs. F. 
H. Burke, 626 Market St., S. F. 



VERBA BCENA JERSEYS— The best A.J 
C. C. registered prize herd is owned by Henry 
Pierce, San Francisco. Animals for sale. 



JERSEYS, HOLSTEINS AND DURHAMS. 

Dairy Stock specially. Hogs, Poultry. Estab- 
lished 1876. William Niles & Co. Los Angeles, 
Cal. 



AYR SHI RES — Young Bulls. Cows and Heifers. 
Registered. From prize winning families. 
SllORTIIORNS-Of the famous Golden Drop 
family. All stock registered and sold on both 
blood lines and individuality. Brown & Brandon, 
Petaluma, Cal. 



SUNSET 
LIMITED 



One of the most magnilicent 
trains ever built. For 1901-1902 
tri-weekly via Coast Lino and 
Sunset Route for 

NEW ORLEANS and 
NEW YORK 

Leave SAN FRANCISCO 4:50 p m. 

Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays 

Leave LOS ANGELES 8:30 a, m 

Tuesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays 

Arrive NEW ORLEANS 7:20 p m. 
Thursdays, Saturdays. Mondays 



Among the world's noted High- 
ways of Travel not one equals 
the route of this train. 
Get the little book, " Wayside 
Notes," from any agent of the 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC 

Initial trip of Sunset Limited 
Friday, Dec. 6, from San Francisco 




Without the KNIFE 

You can remove 
Soft Bunches like 

Goitre, Tumors, Gangloin, 

Bursal Enlargements, etc. 

WITH 

Absorbine, Jr. 

Pleasant to use. Highly perfumed. 
$1 .00 per bottle by mail. Describe your 
case fully. Address 

W. F. YOUNG, P. D. F., 



SPRINGFIELD, 



MASS. 



For sale by Mack & Co., Langley& Michaels Co , 
Redington & Co., J. O'Kane, and J. A. McKerron, 
all of San Francisco. 




BUSINESS COLLEGE 
24 Post Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

The oldest, the largest, the most popular com- 
mercial school on the Pacific Coast. 18,000 gradu- 
ates: 25 teachers: 60 typewriters; over 300 students 
annually placed in positions. Send for catalogue. 

E. P. II I Preslden 



KENNEL ADVERTISEMENTS 



Nineteenth Annual Trials 



-OF THE- 



Pacific Coast 
Field Trials Club 



TO HE RUN AT 



Santa Maria 

SANTA BARBARA COUNTY 

Commencing Monday, Jan. 13, 1902 



Mem be s' Stake 

Annual Derby 

All-Aged Stake 

Champion Stake 

Entries ror All-Aged Stake close I>eo. 1 5. 1901 
W. S. TEVIS. ALBERT BETZ, 

President. Secretary. 
No. 201 Parrott Butlilg, S. F , Cal. 

«»-For Entry Blanks and information address the 
Secretary. 



On anything pertaining to 
Dogs in health or disease 
CONSULT L> Ai KLE|N> 



Gen. Pac. Coast Agent 
Dn. Geo. W. Clayton's 
up-to-date Dog Medicines. 
Literature Free. 



Room 7, 420 Mont- 
gomery St. (10 to 12 
A. M , 2 to 4 p. u.) 
San Francisco, Cal. 
Unsurpassed Kennel and Hospital accommoda- 
tions. Visits in and outof town. Advice by mall 
Twenty years' experience in Europe and the East 



AT STUD 

CUBA OF KENWOOD 

(Ulenbeigh Jr.— Stella) 
SAM'S BOW 
(Plain Sam— Djlty Dee II) 

STOCKOALE KENNELS 

R. M. DODGE, Manager, 
Bakerafleld, Kern Co., 

Boarding. Pointer Puppies and well brokeu 

Dogs for sale. 



Dog Diseases 



How t o Feed. 

Mailed Free to any address by the 
author, H. Clay Glover, D. V. S., 
1278 Broadway, New York. 



JflfTED - DOGS WITH MANGE 

jtirio cum mm wim mandakdoil or m*. 

^4lNDFORClWl.ljU».S tt.MIMONIM^ vormi wmph 

Wg" -STA NDARD DIAISFCCTViT CO_Cl evtto«d O 



H. F. LORQUIN 



TAXIDERMIST 



Dealer in Naturalists' Supplies 

SCIENTIFIC MOUNTING OF BIRDS. RUGS, 
" Heads, Animals, Fishes, Reptiles, Insects 
319 Kearny St. (upstairs) San Francisco. 

Phone, Black 5332 



Mark Levy & Co. 



HARK LEVY 
Expert Cutter 
and Filler... 
Fine Suit! 
from 

$25.00 up 




Only the 
Best Help 
Employed... 
All work 
done on the 
premises 



36 Geary $1., S. F. Room* 10-20 Phone Grant I5« 



Flint Carriage Hardware Go 

31 BEALE ST , SAN FRANCISCO 

TAEALERS IN WHIPS, SPONGES, CHAMOIS 
Racing and Trotting Plates and Horse Shoes, 
Plate and Horse Shoe Nails, Rubber Pads and 
English Bar Pads, Springs, Axles, Iron, Steel, etc. 



FIELD, 

HOG 

FENCE 



WIRE 



GOODS 

NETTING 

FENCING 



West Coast Wire and Iron Works 

17-10 Fremont St., San Francisco, Cal. 



JANUARY 4, 1902| 



©he gvs&bev mtfc f&povt&nxaxi 



15 



INTERESTING and VALUABLE 

HORSE BOOKS 

MAKE YOUR SELECTION. 

Any of the following Books will be sent Postpaid for the price named: 



THE PRACTICAL HORSE KEEPER 

By George Fleming, L,£. D., F. K. C. V. S. 

A guide to those who have to do 
with horses, containing- chapters 
on Breeding. Purchasing, Stable 
and Stabling, Feeding and Gen- 
eral Management, Riding, Hunt- 
ing, Breaking and Training, Har- 
ness and Driving, Shoeing and 
Diseases of the Foot, Injuries, 
Lameness, Diseases of the Horse, 
the Ass and Mule, etc. Bound 
in cloth. Size, 5£ x 7j inches. 
90c. 




A SHORT HISTORY OF THE AMERICAN 
TROTTING AND PACING HORSE 

By Henry T. Coates. 

The book, besides treating of 
Driving Horses, gives a con- 
densed history of the best horses 
in this country, with mention of 
their best performances. It is 
invaluable in its suggestions to 
horse trainers, and is the latest 
book on this subject published. 
Illustrated with 4 fine pictures. 
Size, 5J x 1\ inches. Bound in 
cloth 90c 



THE 

AMERICAN 
PACING 

AND 
TROTTING 

HORSE 



COATES 



YOUATT ON THE HORSE 




The Horse. By Wm Youatt. 

Together with a General 
History of the Horse and a 
Dissertation on the American 
Trotting Horse and an essay 
on the Ass and the Mule, by 
J. S. Skinner. With an en- 
graving on steel and 58 illus- 
trations on wood. Bound in 
full cloth. Size, 5J x 8J 
inches $1.15 



THE HORSE IN THE STABLE AND IN 
THE FIELD 



His management in health 
and disease. By J. H. Walsh, 
F. R. C S. (Stonohenge). 
Illustrated with over 80 en- 
gravings from photographs. 
Handsomely bound in cloth. 
Size, 5J x 7{ inches $1 .15 




DISEASES OF THE HORSE AND HOW TO 
TREAT THEM 

By Robert Chawner. 

New Edition and Concise Man- 
ual of Special Pathology for 
use of Horsemen, Farmers, 
Stock Raisers and Students of 
the Agricultural Colleges. 
Fully illustrated. Bound in 
cloth. Size, 5$ x 7$ inches 
Cloth $1 25 




"It is an unpretending treatise 
free from technicalities, and well 
adapted for the use of farmers and 
stock raisers. The object of Dr. 
Chawner was to make a popular and 
reliuoiehandbook in that dep irtment of veterinary science which 
treats of the horse and his diseases and in this object he has 
succeeded and supplied a practical want. There is no extraneous 
matter. Information is imparted with commendable brevity and 
in language plain and simple enough to be understood by all, The 
fallacies of the old school are rejected, and the treatment pre- 
scribed is that of modern practitioners."— Turf, Field and Form. 



THE AMERICAN GENTLEMAN'S STABLE 
GUIDE 

The American Gentleman's 
Stable Guide, containing a de- 
scription of the American Sta- 
ble and Method of Feeding, 
Grooming and the general 
management of horses, to- 
gether with the directions for 
the care of carriages, harness, 
etc. Fully illustrated. Pocket 
Edition. Size, 5x7 inches. 
Bound in cloth $1.15 




"The book contains a familiar description of the American 
stable, the most approved method of feeding, grooming and general 
management of horses, together with directions for the care of 
carriages, harness, etc. The whole is founded on the careful study 
and experience of many years of the author's life, and forms a val- 
uable manual for any one who has charge of the noblest of man's 
irrational servants. Its low price and great value should give it 
general circulation among horsemen."— Indiana Farmer. 



HOSRE BREEDING RECOLLECTIONS 

By Count t,ehendorn* 

The Manager of the Govern- 
ment Stud of Germany, who 
has made a special study of 
the intricacies of horse breed- 
ing, and in the volume before 
us embodies the result of yoars 
of careful study. While all 
may not agree with his con- 
clusions, none will disputothe 
value of his observations. 
Si/.o, 5$ x 8£ inches Bound 
in full cloth $1.15 



7 JlN(j 



^OLLEGTIOJIS 

B ' ■'<±'Gz&(5->!>— 

Col/fir LcprfooqFF 



" The recital of his experiences and the suggestions which he 
furnishes will undoubtedly prove of value to all who are interested 
in equine matters. Everyono so interested ought to own a copy of 
this valuable vadc mecu'm." 



THE TROTTING HORSE OF AMERICA 

How to Train and Drive Him, with Reminiscences 
of the Trotting Tuif. 

By Hiram Woodruff. 

Edited by Charles J. Foster. 
Including an Introductory 
Notice by George Wilkes and 
a Biographical Sketch by the 
Ed itor. With a steel portrait 
of the author and six engrav- 
ings on wood of celebrated 
trotters. 12mo. Size, h\ x 7£ 
inches. Cloth, extra.. $1.25 




' The author was one of the most 
noted horsemen of this country, and 
in the work before us has given 
to the public the best thoughts, 
founded on years of experience in the feeding, handling, breaking 
and training of colts with a view to securing their best perform- 
ances. Besides treating of driving horses, it gives a condensed 
history of the best horses in this country, with a mention of their 
best performances. It is invaluable in its suggestions to horse 
trainers, and its rules laid down and suggestions given are as good 
as the day they were written." 



New e 
100 ill 

pages 



BOOK OF THE FARM 

Or the Handy Book of Husbandry 

Containing Practical Infor- 
mation in regard to Buying 
or Leasing a Farm; Fences 
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and Medical Treatment of 
the Cattle, Horses, Sheep, 
Swine and Poultry; Manage- 
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author of " Draining For 
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dition, thoroughly revised by the author. With 
ustrations. 12mo. Size, 5£ x 1\ inches. 542 
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animals and tho management of the business."— Sumiai/ Mai/azim . 



JERSEY, ALDERNEY AND GUERNSEY COWS 



By 




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Their History, Nature and 
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Edited from tho writings of 
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6 



[January 4, 190 



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Edgar Forstor, high average, 95%. Ed. Schultz and Otto Feudner, 92%. 
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3 



[January 11, 190 



Holiday Racing at Redding. 

The following delayed account of racing held at Red- 
ding, Shasta county, in this State, on tho 23d, 24th 
and 25th of December, reached us this week: 

Editor Breeder and Sportsman:— The meeting 
held here during Christmas week was a decided suc- 
cess, both financially and otherwise. Tho racing was 
good, the betting lively and some of the races were 
hotly contested. 

The first day, Monday, December 24th, the quarter- 
mile dash was won by Tom Lafoon's French}' Stone in 
0:23A and 0:24, and the samo owner's mare Haidee won 
the half-mile dash in 0:4!M. The trotting and pacing 
race for the 2:40 class was between Kinney Mac, owned 
by Douglas Cone, of Red Bluff, and E. C. Wilkes, 
owned and driven by James Cnmmings, of Redding. 
Kinney Mac won in straight heats in 2:40 and 2:41. 

The second day there was a 2:30 trotting and pacing 
event between Kinney Mac and Billy Anderson, the 
latter entered and driven by William Brown, of Red 
Bluff. The race was won by Kinney Mac in 2:48 and 
and 2:48i without effort. As Billy Anderson was no 
match for Kinney Mac and all desired to see the latter 
horse extended, tho racing committee asked tho vet- 
eran driver L. E. Rowley to give them an exhibition 
mile. Tho colt is but four years old, and the track at 
Redding is very heavy and slow, but Mr. Rowley 
brought him out and Kinney Mac was sent off with a 
saddle horse to accompany him as a prompter. The 
saddle horse proved to be rather too slow to be of any 
benefit, but the colt stepped the mile in 2:21 very 
handily and at no time did he seem to be fully ex- 
tended. He has no record faster than 2:40, which he 
made on the first day of this meeting, and the horse- 
men hero all predict that if he is taken through the 
circuit this year he will prove himself a worthy son of 
the great McKinney. Ho is a beautiful brown, stands 
15.2, weighs 1050 pounds and is tho image of that great 
horse Zombro 2:11 by the same sire. 

Christmas Day being a general holiday and the last 
day of the races, tho stores were all closed and Redding 
turned out en masse. The feature of the day was 
tho free for all pacing and trotting race. There were 
threo entries — Deacon, entered by William Brown, 
Ruby J., entered by F. N. Frany, and Kinney Mac, 
entered by L. E. Rowley, all of Red Bluff. Kinney 
Mac was drawn and the contest was between the other 
two. Deacon had been through tho California circuit 
of 1001, and gained a record of 2:23. Ruby J. is an 
old livery mare eleven years old and was taken out of 
tho livery stable only eight days before the race, so it 
was thought she stood no chance of winning, but the 
little mare showed she had speed and gameness still, 
as she won as she pleased in straight heats, the time 
being 2:27 and 2:22A. The first running race of the day 
was a five-eighths dash, between Johu L., Goraldine, 
Buckhorn and Haidee. Geraldine won in 1:03. The 
last race was a three-quarter mile dash in which but 
two horses started, Reason, owned by Smith of Red 
Bluff, and Sky Blue, owned by Harry Winsley of 
Redding. Reason won easily in 1 :1G. The racing was 
well conducted throughout and those who attended 
were greatly pleased. Subscriber. 



Matinee Driving American Sport. 

In a recent number of the Cleveland Pluindealer, H. 
K. Devereux writes the following: 

"Brilliant as has been the success of our local driv- 
ing the past seven years, the promise for 1902 is even 
for greater things. People have become educated to 
matinee racing and they like it. A Saturday after" 
noon in the spacious and cool grand stand at Glenville 
track with good music to listen to, good friends to talk 
to and exciting and interesting contests to watch, 
make up a summer afternoon's entertaiumont and 
pleasure that thousands of our good citizens have 
learned to anticipate. This free and delightful enter- 
tainment is made possible on account of the interest in 
the sport and love of the horse shown by so many of 
our prominent men of means, and their good sports- 
manship and generosity. Cleveland, too, is peculiarly 
adapted to the success of such an enterprise as this 
driving club. We have always been what might bo 
termed a horsey city and our particular pet has always 
been the very best American product in this line — the 
American trottor. This has resulted somewhat from 
the fact that Ohio has always stood in front as one of 
the States that has given much attention to breeding 
and'raising good horses, and then, too, we are very 
near the blue grass country of Kentucky — the very 
center of the horse breeding industry. The fashion 
and love for driving a fast horse was made many years 
ago by tho most prominent ir.cn of this then small city 
and we havo followed in their footsteps. Driving a 
fast horse is a sport purely American, and no spot in 
the United States is more truly American in tho habits 
and tastes of its residents than the Western Reserve. 
Our track has always been among the foremost in the 



country; conceived and handled as it was and has been 
by the most prominent men of affairs in the city, it 
has always been well managed and patronized by tho 
best element and Cleveland has always stood as a syno- 
nym among horsemen as a place for honest racing and 
sensational time. 

"Our driving club built on such foundation is natur- 
ally successful. We started seven years ago to make 
world's records and we are still maintaining our posi- 
tion, though following our load, competition by clubs 
in other cities is getting very keen. In this seven years 
there havo sprung into existence perhaps 150 driving 
or matinee clubs that control probably noarly 5000 
fast trotters and pacers. This means the interest of 
many thousand men as ownors and thousands more 
men and women as interested spectators, and this is 
only tho beginning. What this influence may grow to 
be is hardly conceivable. The 'horseless age' is a 
myth, the 'horsey age' a reality. Our local club, 
strong in numbers and quality of men, well supplied 
with fast horses, will make the coming season one of 
more interest than any past. One man I know of has 
commissions from seven or eight different men to buy 
them something good at prices ranging anywhere 
from $2(100 up to an unlimited amount. One of our 
members offered $25,000 for a mare last season. A 
horso sold in New York recently Tor $10,500 and the 
purchaser remarked that if he could bring the horse 
to Cleveland next fall and win tho championship chal- 
lenge trophy he would be satisfied if tho horse then 
died. Another man on refusing an offer of $10,000 for 
his horse remarked that his horso was for sale at no 
price, for he was to be prepared and pointed for an 
effort to win this challenge trophy and that he would 
consider it cheap if it cost him $2000. 

"It has been said that a man offered over $50,000 for 
the great Cresceuslast summer in order that he might 
win this cup. Already many men of Boston, New 
York, Chicago, Pittsburg and other cities are planning 
to come to Cleveland next September for that cup. 
They may take it away from Cleveland, but if fates are 
kind to us they will have to come with the best kind 
of tools, for they will get a horse race, and it looks as 
if the world's wagon record might take a tumble." 

Sacramento Driving Club. 

[Record-Union, Jan. 2J 

The matinees of the Sacramento Driving Club, the 
first of which for the season of 1902 will probably be 
given in April, will prove attractive for all lovers of 
speedy roadsters. Tho club, which was organized last 
fall, is in a healthy condition financially, and the best 
of feeling exists among tho members, each of whom 
hopes to astonish tho others with the speed of his 
favorite at the first meet. The Driving Club just now 
is resting. Many of the fast horses are out on grass, 
and no dues will bo collected during tho first three 
months of the new year. 

The club will use its host efforts to induce the Super- 
visors, and especially Mr. Brooke, to oil tho road from 
the County Hospital north to tho Lake House, which 
would give a beautiful stretch of fivo miles. The road, 
the members of the club say, will be easily giaded, and 
after the oil shall have been applied there will be 
plenty of space for an excellent speedway. With a 
compact, oiled track, heavy wagons will not take the 
speedway, and the buggies will keep to tho sides. It 
is understood that a committeo will wait on the Super- 
visors at tho proper time and request that tho improve- 
ment bo made. 

"Albert Elkus will likely come out in the spring 
with a new fast one," said a member of the club to a 
R<xt> id- Union reporter yesterday, "and Harry Bell 
may also bo in line with a speedy one that nobody 
knows anything about. Hugh Casey, if reports are 
correct, has two good ones hidden away, and ho may 
bo able to catch some of the boys. In fact, every 
member of the club has his eyes about him with the 
hope of buying a good one that will show the bunch 
his heels. 

"Vet Tryon, during his last trip East, bought a new 
bay pacer for Georgo Clark. The colt has a record of 
2:20, and the Mayor will havo a place in the front rank. 

"Frank Wright's Pearl Sinclair and Baby Button 
are turned out, and they ought to come up good in the 
spring. Wright is now driving J. E. Terry's mare 
Margaretta. The mare's record is 2:12}. 

"Homer Buckman is now driving the sorrel stallion 
Fashion, owned by another member of tho club, and 
C. W. Paine drives Peo, who is showing well and foot- 
ing fast. 

"Joe Bowers drives Silver Bee, and declines to take 
tho dust of tho best of them. Silver Bee, it is under- 
stood, is showing good form and may bo expected to 
set a fast clip when the season matinees open. 

"S. L. Upson's mare Regina F. is resting, and Billy 
Irwin's big sorrel horse is at Lodi in charge of Tom 
Holmes. 

"Frank Wright has a promising colt out of Upson's 



mare Regina F. by Knight, sire of Anaconda. He will 
bring the youngster out in tho spring. 

"John Batcher's horse Captain Hackett is going 
very fast, and will make some of the good ones step 
out to head him. 

"William Trust's Candy Joe is out on grass, and Dr. 
Weldon's Elevator is turned out at Gait. Frank Ruh- 
staller's Monroe B. and Hanrahan's Gray Ghost are 
both out for the winter." 



Facts About a Great Stallion. 

Early speed is natural speed, and natural speed is 
inherited speed. The hight st test of early race horse 
speed is ability to win the Kentucky Futurities. The 
best bred mares in the country are annually entered 
for these great yearly events, and the colt that wins 
must be of the highest class. The special cross that 
recurs with more frequency in the Kentucky Futurity 
winners than any other is that of Baron Wilkes. 

His son, Oakland Baron 2:09}, won the three year 
Futurity in 1895. 

China Silk 2:16}, out of his daughter, won the two 
year Futurity of 1896. 

is9!? ieno - by a 80D ' won the two year Futurit y of 

Extasy, his daughter won second money in the three 
year Futurity at the same meeting. 

Fereno 2:10), by a son, won tho three year Futuritv 
of 1900. J 

Peter Stirling 2:111, by a son, won the three year 
Futurity of 1901. J 

Oxford Boy (2) 2:20, winner of tho two year Futurity 
of 1901, has daughters of Baron Wilkes for both 
grandams. 

At seven meetings the blood of Baron Wilkes is first 
six times, and second once when pitted against the 
greatest young trotters in the world. In the first, 
second and third generations, it is first to the wire 
against all comers. Can there be better evidence of 
Us Value in producing and reproducing early winning 
speed of the right kind than this? 

Baron Wilkes has been recognized for years as the 
leading money-winning sire, and this fact is reflected 
in his 2:15 list. Ho and Onward lead with the same 
number of trotters and pacers that havo records of 
2:15 or faster. But no family has reproduced Futurity 
winners with tho unerring certainty which distin- 
guishes that of Baron Wilkes. 

His fastest trotter and largest money winner is Oak- 
land Baron 2:09}. This horse »tands out prominently 
as his best racing son, for he was a winner in his two, 
threo and fivo year old form. At two years he trotted 
to a record of 2:141, extreme natural speed, and after 
this supreme effort stayed sound and good enough to 
win $25,000 in races. What other stallion has done as 

Well? 

Oakland Baron is a brown horse, sixteen hands high, 
of the greatest stamina and of powerful muscular de- 
velopment. Its family is noted for its good bone, but 
he has the one grand requisite in a stock horse many 
of tho family lack, and that is size. This probably 
comas to him through his dam, Lady Maekav, daughter 
of Fleetwing (dam of Stamboul 2:07A, Ruby'2:19ij, etc.), 
a daughter of Hambletonian 10. Fleetwing's descend- 
ants run large, as a rule, and a cross to The Moor, 
through Lady Mackay and Silver Threads, has a ten- 
dency to maintain tho size and speed both. Lady 
Mackay is bred much the same as Stamboul 2:07<, the 
great sire, race horse and show winner. Both are 
from the same dam, and by sons of The Moor. The 
pedigree of Oakland Baron is n fineexample of what 
may be termed alternate line-breeding. Starting with 
his fourth dam by Abdallah, there is an outcross to 
George M. Patchen, brought in to Hambletonian, out 
again to Silver Th leads and The Moor, then back to 
the original line through Baron Wilkes, three times to 
tho Abdallah, and twice out to the Clay lines. It is a 
happy combination, keeping alive the size, speed and 
constitutional vigor of the families, and resulting in 
tho highest type of harness race horse, as instanced 
by Oakland Baron. His stud career has started 
auspiciously, for from his early foals have already 
come Dreamer (3) 2:14}, Lucie May 2:22i and Oakland 
Pilot 2:29. 

Oakland Baron heads the Penn Valley dispersal sale 
at the midwinter January auction in Madison Square 
Garden, and it will be well for breeders who wish to 
raise stake winners and the best type of good sized, 
fast and tine looking, light harness horses to weigh 
well tho claims of this stallion, and consider tho facts 
that are here presented. No stallion lives or,ever has 
lived of more prospective value. 



American Stallions in Russia. 

In a letter to a friend in this country Frank Starr, 
who is training horses at St. Petersburg, says there 
are twenty-five American stallions in tho stud in 
Russia. Among them are such well known trotters as 
Baron Rogers 2:09j, formerly ownod by J. Malcolm 
Forbes; Bayreuth 2:20.1 formerly driven on the road in 
New York by Thomas Lynch, Jr.; Nominee 2:17}, 
from the Empire City Siud of William Simpson; Edgar 
2:16} ; Alvin 2:11; Orlund L, 2:16}; Winterset 2:24.1; 
Good Gift 2:28; Wilkesdale 2:29; Quarter Cousin 2:23j, 
and Harlo 2:23}, 

A well bred stallion, full brother to Listerine 2:131, 
is offered for sale by Geo. Warlow, of Fresno. This 
horso has two crosses to Onward, the most successful 
sire of 1902 as regards race winners. He is by Atha- 
don, that held the yearling champion record of 2:27 in 
1891, and is out of an Onward mare that has produced 
two fast performers. Ho is a three year old and very 
promising. See advertisement in this issue for full 
pedigree. 



January 11, 1902] 



3 



A New Zealand Starting Machine. 

Handicapping trotters and pacers is successfully 
done in Europe'and Australia but has never yet beon 
satisfactorily accomplished in this country, the homo 
of the trotting horse and the cradle of harness racing. 
The reason is that the foreigners are willing to accept 
a start from a standstill, while American owners and 
trainers insist on their horses being in motion and "on 
their stride.'' A majority of the trotting races in New 
Zealand, where trotting is receiving much attention in 
recent years, are handicaps and the horses start on a 
time handicap. The horse considered the slowest is 
sent away first, the next horse a certain number of 
seconds later and so on. Horses handicapped in the 
same notch get the word together The usual cus- 
tom in that country has been to have the starter hold 
a watch and sound a gong for the horses to start by, 
positions having been drawn and tho horses lined up 
with the horse to be first started at the pole. As tho 
bell rings for each one he starts from a standstill, and 
tho training of a trotter in New Zealand therefore in- 
cludes teaching him to stand quietly and get away 
quickly and on a trot when called upon, which accounts 
for the large number of well-mannerod horses scon on 
the tracks thero. The New Zealandors aro thor- 
oughly up to date in racing affairs, and many devices 
that tend to make racing popular with the public have 
originated in that country. 

On our first page to-day, a new machine for starting- 
trotting and pacing races is shown. This is the inven- 
tion of Mr. A. Commetti, of Petone, and was used for 
the first time at the Wellington meeting last Novem- 
ber. As will be seen from tho engraving the machine 
has something the appearance of the jockey boards in 
use on American tracks and contains in their proper 
order the numbers worn by the horses to start. It 
works by a clock device and can be set to start any 
number of horses that may be handicapped. When 
the horses are lined up, the machine is set going and 
the gong sounds for the first horse to get away. When 
the required number of seconds have elapsed another 
sound of the gong gives the signal for the second horse 
and after the proper interval the third horse is dis 
patched in a like manner and so on. the gong sounding 
automatically at absolutely correct intervals. It is 
said that the trial of the machine at Wellington was 
very successful. 

Agents Are Too Greedy. 

The fact that the agents of the British Government 
are now making the rounds of the various running 
tracks buying' up broken-down thoroughbreds gives 
some idea of the difficulty which these agents are hav- 
ing in securing the necessary horses for the prosecu- 
f'on of the war in South Africa. — Exchange. 

The British agents and their sub-agents are not hav- 
ing as great difficulty in securing suitable horses as 
most people imagine. In the system of "graft" which 
prevails whenever supplies of any sort are to be pur- 
chased for the use of armies, a fair price for a fair 
horse is seldom paid to the breeder or horse owner. 
Thero are so many "cuts" to betaken out of the prices 
paid by the government before the money reaches the 
original owner that he is loth to part with his stock 
for the very small prices offered him. For horses 
which the British Government pays $125, the original 
owners get about $50 or perhaps not more than $40, 
so that it is no wonder there is great difficulty experi- 
enced by the agents in securing a supply. Broken- 
down thoroughbreds (geldings, especially) can bo pur- 
chased from $10 to $25 per head, and tho foisting of 
these animals onto an army is ridiculous, as they are 
totally unsuited to the requirements of war, while 
their ailments are nearly always in the legs and feet, 
making them unfit to travel great distances or carry 
weight. The British Government could get all the 
horses necessary in the United States if its agonis 
would pay a fair market price for good horses, but so 
long as they insist on making from one hundred to two 
hundred per cent, profit on every horse sold, the 
shortage will exist and the South African army will 
bo mounted on broken-down horses or any old thiug. 



Breed Draft Horses. 

Draft horse breeding has a hold upon tho farmers 
never before equalod. It has como to bo tho substan- 
tial business side of horso breeding, best adapted to 
the farm with the market deman Is greater than tho 
supply and consequent advance in prices. There has 
never been such an opportunity for horse breeding. 
The whole world wants good draft horses. Exporters 
are unable to secure one half as many as they want, 
and despite automobiles and electric cars our groat 
commercial prosperity is eager for more big draft 
horses with vim, beauty and action for which a biff 
premium is paid above ordinary prices. This should 
encourage farmers to breed vigorously for tho top. 
Secure the very best high grade and pure bred draft 
mares and breed to the very best sires then bend 
every energy to develop these colts by vigilant care 
and abundant feed. 



Occident and Stanford Stakes. 



Secretary . Geo. W. Jackson of the California State 
Agricultural Society sends us the following list of 
payments made on January 2d for the Occident and 
Stanford Stakes. 

There are 29 third payments of $10 in the Stanford 
Stako of 1902 against 2lt third paymonts made in this 
stake of 1901. 

The Occident Stake of 1902 has .'12 payments of $25 
each against 25 in tho stako of 1901. 

The Occidont Stake of 1903 has socond paymonts 
against 59 made in the stako of 1902. 

These payments show a healthy increase in trotting 
horse interests in California. Tho payments made aro 
as follows: 

THIRD PAYMENTS STANFORD STAKE, 1002— $10 EACH. 

J D Carr, ch c Larkin W bv Hoodie Jr. 

Juan Uallegos, oh f Carita by Direct Rrinco. 

Alex Brown, b c by Nushagak-Nosegay; br o by Nushagak- 
Wood flower. 

F D McGregor, b f by Cock Kobin-Mabel. 

B Trefry, blk f by Zojnbro-Dalsy. 

J Doran, b f Oakland Maid bv McKinney. 

Wm. Duncan, br f Honolulu Maid bv Kentucky Karon. 

J H Iverson, blk c Prince Kio by Alta Rio; b f Ruble by Altamont. 

C A Durfee, b c Cuatc by McKiuney. 

I L Rorden, b f La Belle Altamont by Altamont. 

E Gay lord, b f Oouliauza bv .lames Madison. 

H M Ayer, blk f Yera by Chas Derby. 

L H Todhunter, b f Zombowvette by Zombro. 

H Williams, b f The Masco! bv Irau Alto 

T W Barstow, b f Maud J by Wilkes Direct 

A G Gurnett, b f by Si Nicholas-Nellie Fairmont. 

Santa Rasa Stock Farm, br c Biscara Russell by L W Russell: 
blk f Flora Russell by L W Russell: ch f Lou Russell by L W 
Russell: ch c I'ansy Dilhin by Sidiey Dillon 

H K Burke, b c Harry K by Ceo Washington. 

A F Hamiltou, b c Grand Flaneur bv Meridian. 

Mrs S V BarstOW, b g Jubilee by Wilkes Direct. 

W K Meek, br f by Weleoiue-Hybla 

Tut tie Bros, br c Suomi bv Zombro. 

H P Moore, b f Etta Wood by Boxwood. 

W F Snyder, b f Martha Washington by Waldstein. 

THIRD PAYMENTS OCCIDENT STAKE, 191)2— $25 EACH. 

Juan Gallegos, ch f Carita by Direct Prince. 
Thos Smith, ch e Gen'l Washington by Geo Washington 
Alex Hrowu, b f by Nushagak-Woodfiower; be by Nushagak- 
Nosegay. 

R. I Mulholland. ch f Maggie N. by Hambletoniau Wilkes. 

J. D Carr. ch c Larkin W. by Boodle Jr 

Edw Gaylord, b c Conttanza bv James Madison. 

H. M. Ayer. br f Vera bv Chas Derby. 

W. F. Snyder b I Martha Washington by Waldstein. 

W. H. Lumsden, b c McPherson bv McKinney 

Mrs. S. V. Barstow, b c Jubilee by Wilkes Direct. 

Jas. W Minturn. br f Ilsa by Ildrim. 

H. E Burke, b e Harry B. by Goo Washington. 

J. B. Iverson, b f Ruble bv Altamont: blk c Prince Rio by Alta 
Rio. 

I. L. Borden, b f La Belle Altamont by Altamont. 
Chas. Durfee, b e Cuate by McKinney. 

Tuttle Bros , br c Suomi by Zombro 

J Doran, b f Oakland Maid by McKinney. 

H. P. Moore, b f Etta Wood by Boxwood. 

Santa Rosa Stock Farm, br c by L. W. Russell-Kiscara; blk ( by 
L. W. Russell-Flora Allen; ch c by Sidney Dillon-Pansy. 

L. H. Todhunter, b f Zombowyette by Zombro. 

H. Williams, b c The Mascot by Iran Alto. 

A. F. Hamilton, b c Grand Flaueur by Meridian. 

H W. Meek, b f by Welcome-Feuella; b t by Welcome-El lenor; 
b f by Welcome-Edwina. 

F. D. McGregor, br f by Cock Robin-Mabel. 

F. L. Duncan, br f Honolulu Maid bv Kentucky Baron. 

H. W. Meek, b or br f by Welcome-Hybla. 

SECOND PAYMENTS OCCIDENT STAKE 1903— $15 EACH. 

C Masoero, b f Daphne McKinney. 

W J Irvine, b c April Fool. 

W O Bowers, ch f by Silver Bee-Sadie Benton. 

B Erkenbrecher, blk t by McKinney-Galette Wilkes. 

W H Lumsden, br f Iudamont: b c Robin Stanley. 

Chas A Durfee blk f Ragsie; br c Greeko; br c Jim Rea. 

J VV Minturn, br f Imogen. 

L E Clawson, b c Keelev. 

I L Borden, blk f Alta Cresco: b f Sadie L. 

J Gallegos Jr, b f Sofia McKinney. 

La Siesta Ranch, b c Moonlight. 

H M Ayers b c William H L. 

Wm MeCuDe, b c Star Mont. 

E A Gammon, blk f by Stam K-Cleo G. 

J W Gardner ch c Tidal Wave 

Geo E Shaw, blk c Cheechako. 

Oak wood Stock Farm, be by Owyhee-Inex: b f by James Mndison- 
Ituna; rn c by James Madison-Stemola; b f by James Madisou- 
Habe Marion; br f by McKinnoy-Eleetway. 

Mrs E W Callendine ch c Cuyuut 

C K Hook, b f Daphne Sidney; br f by Zombro-Leonora. 
PJ Williams blk f Monterey Bells. 

Tuttle Bros, b f by Nutwood Wilkes-Belle Medium; b f by Stam 
B- Laurel. 

G W Kmgsbury, be by Lynmont-Daisy. 
H K Meek, b f by Welcome-Hybla. 

H E Meek, b c by Welcome-Leonora; be by Wm Harold-Fenella; 
b f bv Welcome-Edwina. 
E B Smith, b c by Stam B-Swift Bird. 
Rosedale Stock Farm, b c by St Whips-Da lia. 
S W Lockett. b f Loe Patchen. 
Mrs S V Barstow, b c Star B. 
A .1 Hudson, b c Strathcona. 
F Wright, b Sir Knight. 
C A Owens, ch g Acme. 

Thos Smith, blk c by McKinney-Daisy S; b c by Mambriuo Chief- 
Alumina. 

Alex Brown, b c by Arthur B-Noscgay; ch f by Nutwood Wilkes- 
Wood flower 
Mrs E Williams, b f Matona'Thorne. 
L II Todhunter, br c The Jester. 
Palo Alto Slock Farm, br c Alta Vista. 

Santa Rosa Stock Farm, ch c by Sidney Dillon-Silver Eye; b c 
by L W Russell-Pacita: b f by Sidney Dillon-Pansy; b f by Sidney 
Dillon-Lilly Stanley; ch c Bounce. 

Ben Davis, blk f Dixie S. 

C Canfleld. br f Dixie W. 

Valencia Stock Farm, blk c Amado. 

Thos Charlton & Sons, b c Sullivan. 

Geo W Ford, ch c bv Neernut Florence C. 

C W Main, b f by Zornhm-Zomilea. 

W E Rourke, b or br f Nino Itonita. 

A O Gott, ch c Alameda Wilkes. 

Zalhnerft Lamb, b f Redwood Maid. 

John Baker, b f Freckle Bird. 

D Healey, b c Thomas Murphy. 



England's Lack of Horses. 



An English paper, speaking of tho lack of horsos for 
army purposes in that country, says: 

Not until the olovonth hour has our army in South 
Africa been horsed in a way to enable it to executo its 
work in an efficient manner. A fter tho occupation of 
Bloemfontein, Lord Roberta paused perforce for nearly 
two months whilo his army was boing rehorsed. 
Again, after he had driven the Boers before him to 
Pretoria, he had to wait from June 5th until tho last 
week in July before he was in a position to advanco on 



Middelburg, and in the interval the Boers, gaining 
confidence, inflicted on us the disaster of Nitrals Nek, 
not to speak of their successive and too ofton success- 
ful swoops on our line of communications. But it is 
unnecessary to go through tho whole list of "unfortu- 
nate incidents " Tho difficulties experienced in bring, 
ing about tho end of tho war are present in all our 
minds, and tho same cause, the want of horses, is at 
the root of thom all. The truth is, our establishment, 
has always beon starved. In peace, the "effectivo" of 
horses amounts to something short of 19,000, against 
the 45,000 of Italy, the 78,000 of Austria, the 125,000 of 
Germany, the 140,000 of Russia and the 14:i,000 of 
Franco. In times of war our South African experiences 
have demonstrated it to bo an unknown quantity. 
Other Europoan nations, on tho other hand, have 
special moans of ascertaining, and have made special 
provisions for similar emergencies. But the facts and 
figures mav ho left to speak for themselves. 

In peace time our home army requires between 
18,000 and 19,000 horses. We purchase about L600 
horses a year, and thero are two remount departments 
at Woolwich and Dublin. By the National Defonoo 
Act of 1888, Government was ompowered to purchase 
or hire animals required whenever an order for the 
embodiment of the militia should bo in force. A 
system of registration which was introduced provides 
for the registration of between 14,000 and 15,000 reserve 
horses.at a fee of 10s. a horse. Some 10,000 of these 
are draught horses; the rest aro fitted for riding. 
And this is practically the only provision England 
makes for putting her mounted forces or her transport 
on a war footing. How we should bear the strain of a 
war in which we could not buy and import horses from 
other countries perhaps nobody would liko to say. 

Working Up a Circuit. 

There is no more enthusiastic admirer of the trotting 
horse as a pleasure animal than Mr. E. C. Peart, ouo 
of tho leading merchants of Colusa in this State. Mr. 
Peart always takes an active interest in the local fairs 
and speed contests and owns quite a number of brood- 
mares and promising colts. As one of tho directors of 
the local district fair association, he is very anxious 
that a circuit should be formed by the associations 
north of Sacramento and a series of fairs and race 
meetings given this year. On the first of the year Mr. 
Peart addressed the following circular to the Sec- 
retaries and Directors of the different agricultural dis- 
tricts in that portion of the State: 

Colusa (Cal.), Jan. 2, 1902. 

Dear Sir: — Does your association eontemplato hold- 
ing a district fair at during this summer? 

I believe your county has quite a State appropria- 
tion. Would it not be a good idea for each of tho 
northern counties to call a meeting at s.ime central 
point to discuss this subject and arrange dates, etc.? 

If we expect to hold fairs tho earlier wo move in tho 
matter tho better and by co-operating wo can have tho 
same class races, same size purses, etc., at each place. 
This will bo an inducement for horse owners to enter 
all along the line. 

I would bo pleased to hear from you at an oarly dato. 

Yours truly, E. C. Peart. 

Thero would be no trouble iu arranging three or 
four good circuits in California this year if there was 
one director in each district who had as much interest 
in the mattor and half as much energy as Mr. Peart 
possesses. Wo hope he will get many rosponses to his 
suggestion and that the Northern California circuit 
will be organized and announcements made within a 
few weeks. Tho districts comprising it are among the 
richest farming and stock breeding portions of Cali- 
fornia. 

Electioneer and Wilkes. 

There wore eleven now additions to the 2:10 trotting 
list during the past season, and strangely enough five 
trace to George Wilkes and five to Electioneer, as 
follows: 

WII.KES. KLKCTIONKKK. 

Chain Shot 2:<m>/ t Dolly Dillon 2:07 

Onward Silver 2:1 W Janice 2:0H<4 

Dolly Hidwoll ftODtf F.leata (4) K:08k 

Cornel. a Relle 2:10 Cornelia Hello 2:10 

Dr. Book 2:10 Captor i:m>i 

Tho two that have neither Electioneer nor Wilkes 
are May Allen 2:00] and All Right 2:09$. 

Tho spoed average of tho Wilkes and Electioneer 
divisions aro each under 2:09, with a fractional advan- 
tage to the formor. Tho Electioneer is, however, tho 
younger class, and neither Eleata nor Captor had any 
record prior to 1901. 

All these trotters raced through tho Grand Circuit. 
The total earnings of tho Wilkes quintette woro 
922. 865, an average o[ $4N7.'t, and of tho Electioneers 
828,975, an average of $5795 each. May Allen's earn- 
ings in the Grand Circuit woro $3750 and All Right's 
$2120. Eleata, the youngest trotter in the lot, was tho 
largest money winner of the year, having earned 
$17,925 in seven races. She combines Kentucky Prince, 
Dexter and Electioneer blood. 

Tho value of this table consists in showing tho pre- 
ponderance of extreme speed and money earning ca- 
pacity to bo in the two great lines of Electioneer and 
Wilkes, as against all tho other strains of trotting 
blood . — Exchange. 

Strike!— if thoy don't give you Jackson's Nairn Soda 



4 



[January 11, 1902 



Notes and News, w 



Secretaries: _ 
Claim your dates, 



Announce your programs. 



Get ready for the meetings of 1!>02 



The Los Angeles Driving Club will hold matineo 
racing on Saturday, January 25th. 



Memphis will have a spring meeting that will equal 
in importance any of the big Western meets. 

The last quarter of a mile which Crescens trotted 
in 2:07^ at Dallas, Texas, on New Year's Day, was 
made in 291 seconds. 

John Sawyer is working ten head of trotters and 
pacers at the Seattle track which he pronounces one 
of the best in the country. 



Will Hogoboora has about a dozen horses in his 
string at Walla Walla His stallion Lynmont will 
make a good season there this year. 



A Lexington horseman is in receipt of information 
that leads him to believe Peter Stirling 2:111 will again 
be in J. B. Chandler's stable in 1902. 



Boralma dividos honors lor the record for four year 
old trotting geldings, 2:08, with John Nolan, and for 
five year olds, 2:07, with Lord Derby. 



Charles Marvin, the veteran trainer and driver, has 
gone to Hot Springs, Ark., where ho will spend several 
weeks under treatment for rheumatism. 

Captor is in a class by himself in oue respect. He is 
tho only 2:10 trotter that ever won a race in straight 
heats, with each trotted in precisely the same notch — 
2:09^. 

Daniel Lambert was the most successful brood maro 
sire that ever stood in New England. His daughters 
have produced close to 100 that have taken records of 
2:30 or better. 

Dr. Sphinx by Sphinx, out of Miss Dickey by Pilot 
Medium, is the* sire of the colt Tullnerprinz that 
recently won a stake of 10,0;>0 francs for two year old 
trotters in Italy. 

The inbred Cresceus yearling, owned by R. H. 
Plant and now at Walnut Hall (Steok Farm, has been 
nicely broken to harness, and the caretakers say ho 
trots most attractively. 

Charley Doble is wintering a string of horses at 
Binghamton, New York. In tho string are the Cali- 
fornia bred horses, Thompson 2:14} by Boodle and 
Connie 2:151 by Ketch um. 



The stallion Erosmont by Eros is in training at Lodi 
and will be given a record this year. He has takeu to 
pacing and the third time lie had the hopples on paced 
a mile in 2:311, last half in 1:14. 



It is probable that Thornway will be trained and 
raced by the veteran Orrin A. Hickok this year. This 
colt is one of the fastest pacers in America to-day and 
with luck ought to be in the 2:04 list before fall. 



Neva Simmons 2:11} has been consigned to Woodard 
& Shanklin's February auction. She was a useful 
mare on the turf last season, and under tho skillful 
handling of T. W. Price was among the best money 
winners of 1901. 

Andy Welch is planning a $10,000 racs for trotters 
at the Grand Circuit meeting at Cincinnati this year. 
Mr. Welch has not as yet determined upon the class 
of tho race, but will make it so as to bring to the post 
as large a number of high class trotters as possible. 



Several of our Eastern exchanges are referring |to 
the mare Sweet Marie, by Mc Kinney, as a pacer. She 
is as square a trotter as ever wore harness and when 
she trotted two heats in a matineo race in 2:14, and in 
another walked over in 2:13}, she never lifted her head. 



See the list of Palo Alto broodmares in our adver- 
tising columns that are to be sold at auction at the 
Occidental Horse Exchange January 30th. They are 
all grandly bred and in foal to some of the best stallions 
in California. This is a groat opportunity for buyers. 



Tho twelve year old mare Bell Bird 2:22, a daughter 
of Electioneer and the great Beautiful Bells is among 
the mares to be sold at the Palo Alto auction sale in 
this city on tho 30th inst. She is in foal to Iran Alto 
2:12} . What a great mare she should be to breed to a 
good Wilkes stallion. How much will she bring? 



Santa Rosa Stock Farm reports the arrival last 
Tuesday of a bay filly by Iran Alto 2:12} out of Vedral by 
Nutwood, therefore a full sister to Thos. R. 2:15, the 
champion four year old trotting gelding of 1901, and 
tho largest money winner of the trotters that wore 
campaigned in California last year. She is also a half 
sister to Lynda Oak 2:18}, the greatest producing 
daughter of Guy Wilkes. Vedral cost Messrs. Pierce 
Bros, but $200 at the Vendorao sale last month and it 
will take a good deal more than that to purchase this 
filly, as they are very proud of her. 



John Phippen called on us last week prior to leaving 
for Dallas, Texas, where he is engaged in training the 
young Electrites on the farm of Major Exall. Mr. 
Phippen has just finished his annual visit to his family 
and relatives in California and expects to return next 
year to remain hero. 

It is announced that Geo. Spear will race Lord Derby 
next year for his new owner, E. E Smathers. of New 
York. Spear has now in hand for next season: 
Sphinx S. 2:08.1, Iva Dee 2:121, Coxey 2:13, Alice 
Barnes 2:11}, Queen Wilkes, trial, 2:15, and severa 
other good green ones. 

Harry Wilkes 2:13.1, the fastest son of tho great 
George Wilkes, is still living at the advanced age of 
twenty-five years, and is often driven by his owner, 
Senator »V. j. Keyes, of New Jersey. The old hero is 
full of vim, looks as fine as silk, and is said to bo able 
to display quite a bit of his old time speed. 



Sandy Smith loft town last Tuesday for tho Aptos 
Stock Farm, where ho will pull his coat for the first 
time since he got back from the Grand Circuit last 
fall and go to work on tho horses to bo sent to tho 
Cleveland sale in May. Sandy was smiling when ho 
left as if the idea of working was very pleasing to him. 



C. W. Williams will again send his five great stallions 
to Lexington, Ky., in 1902. Allerton 2:09} at fifteen 
years old has ninety-one standard performers to his 
credit, a showing never before equalled by a stallion of 
the same age. He has this year added eight perform- 
ers to the 2:20 list, and is the sire of six with records of 
2:10ij and better. 

The Kentucky Stock Farm is in receipt of reliable 
information to tho effect that Beauseant, brother to 
Boreal 2:15:|, Terrace Queen 2:09}, Velvet Rose, Ele- 
gance and Nysa, owned by J. C. McKinney, Titusville, 
Pa., will be trained at Memphis, at which place they 
are expected to arrive about the first of February. 
Meauseant only started once the past season, but failed 
to got a mark. Lee Shaffer will train these horses. 

Within the last two years a half dozen or more of 
New York's wealthy men have purchased farms near 
that city and stocked them with trotting bred horses. 
More attention is being paid to the American trotter 
now than ever, and although several big breeding 
farms have been discontinued owing to the death of 
owners or other causes, more breeding will bo done 
this year than over before and a much bettor class of 
horses will be bred. 

Tho government has issued a proclamation directing 
the exclusion of horses and cattle from the Philippine 
islands. Agents of the bureau of animal industry 
have found after careful investigation that the horses 
of those islands are afflicted with surra, a disease con- 
tracted by our army horses sent to China from those 
of the Indian regiment serving in that campaign in 
the British army. The cattle have the rinderpest, 
which is considered the worst of all diseases among 
ruminants. 

Perhaps 2:08, known to Californians as tho ringer 
Walter K., is showing all his old timo speed over tho 
New York speedway. He is forever barred from 
appealing in races again, and is now owned by a gen- 
tleman who only cares to use him as a pleasure horse. 
It is said he can show quarters in 30 seconds to wagon 
and that he holds his own when just right with the 
best of the many high priced trotters and pacers that 
are driven over New York's famous drive. 



W. D Althouse of Phoenixville, Pa., who owns 
William Penn 2:07], and who has quite an extensive 
breeding establishment, has bought to cross his fillies 
by William Ponn the royally bred colt, Pearl Finder 
by Directum 2:05}, dam Rose Croix 2:11} by Jay Bird. 
Both tho sire and dam of Pearl Fiuder were crack 
three year olds, Directum being the champion racing 
colt of that age and Rose Croix won the Kentucky 
Futurity in 1896 If breeding counts, the Pennsyl- 
vania breeder has got a groat young horse. 



Scott Hudson will campaign a great string of trot- 
ters and pacers in 1902. Audubon Boy 2:06, Don Riley 
2:11-3 anu Hawthorne (3) 2:13 will of course be included. 
Kanawha Star 2:14), a pacing son of Earl Medium, 
will be with this stable next season. Baron Bsll 2:18} 
by Baron Wilkes has also been added to the string. 
Other members of the stable are The Grazer 2:10; 
Grace Arlington, trial 2:13i{; Cash Jr. 2:20, trial 2:14; 
Tertimin (3), trial 2:08: Orin B., trial 2:081; Bonnie 
Baron, trial 2:271, by Baron Rogers, and several others. 



The price actually offered by W. L. Snow, the Hor- 
nellsville, Now York, trainer, for Zolock 2:101 while in 
this State, was $10,000, and it was made after Mr. 
Davies, owner of Zolock, had refused a previous offer 
of $7500. Mr. Snow was acting for Mr. A. H. Miller, 
a capitalist of Buffalo, New York, who is a relative of 
C. A. Winship of Los Angeles. Mr. Miller owns 
Gazelle 2:11}, tho dam of Zolock. It is Mr. Davies' 
intention to campaign his stallion through the Grand 
Circuit this year and he states to all parties who ask 
for a price on the horse that he is not for sale. 



Notice has been given by the proper authorities that 
there will be no suppressing of time this year at Over- 
land Park, Denver. Heretofore horsemen have on a 
few occasions requested tho time-keepers at Denver to 
add on a few seconds if very fast timo was made in 
order to keep the horso in slower classes than tho 
speed shown justified, and tho requests have often been 
granted. Denver is not the only place this is done, as 
those who follow the races know. This year, the 
management of the Denver association propose that 
every horse shall get the record he actually makes and 
if he trots or paces in 2:10 flat no fractions will be put 
on to keep him in the next slower class. There will 
bo a fair field but no favors. 



If tho Orloff trotters improve as much in speed in 
the next five years as they have in the past five, the 
American trotter is likely to have a competitor in 
Europe. An Amorican trainer in Russia says that the 
Orloffs are breaking the record at every Russian 
meeting, and that the championship mark is now 
down to 2:14}.— ( likwjo Ilor.ievuuv 



There are throo year olds and three year olds, but 
there have never been many Ferenos. Her fastest 
heat in the Futurity was won' in 2:10i), and the handy 
manner in which she accomplished the task stamped 
her as a very great filly. Her equal was not out in 
1901, Peter Stirling being tho nearest approach to one 
of her quality. Before going into winter quarters this 
year Fereno trotted atrial mile better than 2:10. and 
is to-day as sound as she was before she had ever raced. 
Nobody need be surprised if she trots to Fantasy's 
record before retiring permanently from the turf. 
She and Walnut Hall will be in Benyon's string next 
season along with a bunch of good ones believed to 
possess stake qualities — Ky. Stock Farm. 



Lilly Mack 2:24}, a maro bred by P. M. Rush, of 
Novate, in this State, and sold to A. N Burrill, of 
Bangor, Maine, about ten years ago, is the dam of a 
pacer in the 2:^0 list. Lilly Mack was by Auctioneer 
Johnny out of a mare called Old Sue, whoso pedigree 
was never traced. After she was taken to Maine she 
trotted to her present record in 1893, when she was 
nine years old, but was very erratic and for that rea- 
son was put into the breeding ranks. She was bred to 
Donum 2:16}, a son of the Maine champion Nelson 2:09 
and produced a bay colt that was named Salinas that 
took a record last year of 2:22 and has reduced it this 
year to 2:171. It is said that Salinas is very fast, but 
rather uncertain like his dam. being one of the over 
anxious sort. He has never worn hopples, and it is 
predicted he can get a mark of 2:i0 if the Indiana 
pajamas are put on him. 

At the recent Chicago Horse Show, in a class for 
road pairs, there were shown two trotters, hooked 
together, that excited no particular interest among 
the spectators yet did arouse a lot of comment among 
the horsemen present who know about the affairs of 
the harness turf. The horses were Captor 2:09} and 
Dr. Book 2:10, both creditable performers on the 
Grand Circuit tho season just past. Tnoy were placed 
third, just about where those who knew them expected 
they would land. The reason was plain. Neither has 
ever had any schooling for the show ring. While 
both acted like perfect gentlemen and while they were 
well driven they failed to show the vim and buoyancy 
that is demanded. They could step at what is a mere 
jog for thorn and fairly run over the winners, even 
when the latter were hustled along, and they showed 
budding ability at team work. But inexperience and 
low rtesh were against them. One of these days, if all 
goes well, they will be apt to make all other trotting 
teams "go way back and sit down." They are the 
fastest trotters, by the records, ever shown as a pair 
in any show ring. — Couch ami Saddle. 



The recent death, by the burning of a stable, of the 
mare Ella T. 2:08}, daughter of the old stallion Alta- 
mont, solves the mystery of the gray ghost that went 
round the New England half-mile tracks last year and 
the year before wiuning an occasional raceand appear- 
ing under a new name as occasion required. Ella T. 
and her owner. .1. 15. Hall, were expelled for ringing 
two seasons ago. A year ago turfmen attending the 
New England half-mile circuit races remember a gray 
pacing mare at first entered in the 2:24 pacing races 
and later in the 2: 1 9 and 2:20 classes. She was entered 
under the name of Maggie 15 . by Brockton, and was 
said to be a mare that .1. .1. Quinn of Worcester bought 
at a sale there a year before and afterward sold and 
lost track of. The mare went the round of the half 
mile tracks, occasionally taking the money. She was 
looked upon with suspicion d uring the timo that sho 
was raced, and was protested, with a request that bet- 
identification be made. When Mr. Quinn made affi- 
davit that ho had purchased the animal at a sale l ho 
matter was cleared up for a time. After her ringing 
career, a year ago, Maggie B. was taken into Vermont 
and bred to Alcander, and a few weeks ago wasshippi d 
to Clinton, where she was caught in the fire. 



Joe Smith has taken up a half dozen or so young 
trotters and pacers and is jogging them into shape at 
the Vallejo track, which is one of the best winter 
tracks in the State. He has two throe year olds by 
Geo. Washington 2:16ij that are large, fine looking 
colts of much promise. Both are entered in the Occi- 
dent Stake this ear. He also has a two year old 
Washington entered in the Occident for 1903 that is 
already showing well. It was a great pity that tin' 
sire of these colts died so young, as the progeny left 
by him are in every instance big, strong, well boned 
and muscular, with extra good looks and speed. Mr. 
Smith has a two year old by McKinney 2:11} that is a 
full brother to the fast colt Tom Smith, and is as 
promising- a young trotter He was sold a few weeks 
ago to James A. Smith of Vallejo for $600 and will be 
trained. Anothor of Joe Smith's string is a two year 
old by Mambi ino Chief Jr. The mare Trilby 2:23} by 
Mambrino Chief Jr. that ho campaigned last year is in 
foal to Bay wood 2:10}, but will be trained again this 
year in all probability. She got her record when 
quite heavy with foal and after but eight weeks' work, 
and is one of the most promising trotters in California. 
Another prospective trotter that will be worked this 
year is a six year old gelding by Geo. Washington out 
of Economy by Echo. He was bred by tho late By 
Holly and purchased from his estate recently by Mr. 
Thos. Smith, who believes he will be a fast horse. 
Vallejo will give a fair this year and will very likely 
select a date either just before or just after the Napa 
meeting. 

Oa a hot day drink Jackson's Napa Soda lemonade 
and be refreshed. 



January 11. 1902 1 



wit* ^iett»tt inxb &p&vT&tttat\ 



PACIFIC BREEDERS FUTURITY STAKES, $6000, FOR MARES BRED IN 



IQflH I Third Payments of *10 each were made 
I3UU | Foals of Mares i>r.«i in moo. 



NOMINATOR. ENTRY. SIRE. 

Book C K b c McKinney 

*Boone Harvey b f H'gobo'ni's'sSbl Wilkes 

Bruner A W ch f May Wilder Stanton Wilkes 

Beckers Geo T Stam B 

Baldwin E J blk c Neernut 

Barstow T W bo Breeder and Spoilsman. Wilkes Direct 

♦Barstow T W b f True Hear.t Wilkes Direct, 

Bonner RH sc Hijo Diablo 

Boone Harvey bf Stranger 

Borden I L be Nutwood Wilkes 

Borden I L b f Hambletoniau Wilkes 

♦Barstow Mrs S V b f Sweet Alice Wilkes Direct 

Brolliar J gr f My Way Stoneway 

•Brown & Brandon be Longitude Meridian 

Brown Alex McKinney 

Brown Alex Prince Ansel 

Carr J D br f Esperanza Boodle Jr 

Carr J D sf Mercedes Dietatus 

Carr J D be Kumtuks. Dietatus 

Cone DS Kinney Mac 

Coben AH Advertiser 

Clayton E W McKinney 

Desmond DJ bf Geraldine Zombro 

Durfee C A bl c Almaden Direct 

Durfee C A be Jobnnie MeKenzie McKinney 

'Durfee WG blc McKinney 

Dudley ED br f Frikerina Bayswater Wilkes 

Dudley E D br c Eben Holden Uayswater Wilkes ... 

Davis Geo A br f Directrix Key Direct 

Davis Geo A bl c Rey del Valle Rey Direct 

Davis Geo A bl c Odd Ends Rey Direct 

Davis Geo A bl c Directory Rey Direct 

Davis Geo A br c Diamond Diablo 

♦Faris Stock Farm be Judge Biggs Kebi 

Foster PD b c X-Ray Don Marvin 

firnum C E bo Cupid 

Elwert Robt bo Welcome 

UilesCF bcFrank G Wilkes Direct 

Gardner Jno W brf McKinney 

Gallegos Juan McKinney 

♦Gallego-i Juan Nutwood Wilkes 

Grimes FA b f Ruby McKinney McKinney 

Gurnett AG so Diablo 

Gurnett AG s c Diablo 

Gurnett AG sf Nutwood Wilkes 

Humfreville Mrs W V cb c McKinley Nutwood Wilkes 

Hoy S H Bavswater Wilkes 

*Hoy S H Bayswater Wilkes.. . 

Harris Mrs BE c Mambrino Chief Jr. . . 

Haile & Co J W b f Suisun Demonio 

Haile & Co J VV be Buckles Demonio. 

*Hogoboom S H b c Dagan 

Iverson J B bo Dietatus 

Iverson J B ch f Dietatus 

Iverson J B ch f Dietatus 

Iverson J B , ch f Dietatus 

♦Kreig W C be Resolute Wilkes Direct 

Lowe O A b f Light Star Bayswater Wilkes 

♦LanganGS b or br c McKinney 

Lipson I M b c Berlholdi Zolock 

Llpson Mrs Mabel bf Daisy Zolock Zolock. 

La Siesta Ranch b f Wanda II McKinney 

Landers Wm J bf Welcome 

Magruder Geo H s c Harold H Lynmont 

Myers H C be Spinnaker Gaff Topsail 

Meek W E b f Bonita Welcome 

Main C W b f Lady Lazelle Zombro 

Morris Geo H be The Oregon Altamont 

Morgan Wm b f Eva Zombro 

Marshall J W Bayswater Wilkes.... 

Montgomery Sam be Bright Star Bayswater Wilkes 



Morgan Geo J bf Neergueto. 

Minturn Jas W 

Moore HP ch f Phoebe Wood 

Moore H P ch c Nonsense 

Montgomery J E bo 

Moorhead, J M. 



Main & Ronrke b f Ida King Stam B. 



.Neemut 
.Strathway 
. Boxwood. . 
. Boxwood . . 
.Diawood. . . 

.Hambletonian Wilkes.. 



DAM. 

Leonora 
Lou 

Whisper 
Sulta B 
Princess Arlie 
Cam ma 
Cigarette 
Juua 

Allie Cresco 
Alice Belle 
Camaline 
Ethel Basler 
Media 
Krancisca 
Nosegay 
Flossie 
N'iua 11 
Juanita 
Stella Marvin 
Clara C 
Mae Gill 
Gipsy Uirl 
Rose McKinney 
Babe 
Belle 
.Bee 
Babe 
Antcera 
Sideleet 
Moscovine 
Mamie M 
Mtssie Medium 
By Cupid 
Beatrice 
Bessie Hock 
Belle 
Pearl c; 
Black Swan 
Bessie Wilkes 
Liadale 
Rubv 
.Alice G 
Alexandria 
Nellie Fairmont 
Nellie 
Coupon 
Clara Belle 
Honor 
Hannah 
Mamie Comet 
by Waldstein 
Ivoneer 
Salinas Belle 
Belle 

. Wilhelmine 
Nellie G 
Cordie N 
Anna 

Miss Goldnut 
Grace Conifer 
Wanda 
Floret a 
.Mollie Mac 
Easter D 
, Rosemary 
Kate Hamilton 
Algenie 
NellieK 
Miss Glenn 
Hattie B 
Verona 
Carina 
Etta 

Nettie Elwood 
Nancy H 
Anna Belle 
Hazel Kinney 



OakwOOd Park Stock Farm 
Oak wood Park Slock Farm 
Oakwood Park Stock Farm 
Oakwood Park Stock Farm. 
Oakwood Park Stock Farm 
Oakwood Park Stock Farm 
Oakwood Park Stock Farm 
Oakwood Park Stock Farm 
Oakwood Park Stuck Farm 
Oakwood Park Stock Farm 
Oakwood Park Stock Farm 
Oakwood Park Stock Farm 
Oakwood Park Stock Farm. . 



PACIFIC BREEDERS FUTURITY STAKES, $6000, FOR MARES BRED IN 



lanuary 8, 1901, on the follow-in** 

» designates substitution. 

NOMINATOR. KNTRV. BIRR, DAM. 

Mastin Walter be Marvin Wilkes Don Marvin Nora S 

Meek H W b c Welcome Cricket 

Meek H W bf Welcome Carmelita 

•Meek H W ch f Wm Harold Pansy 

♦Meek H W bf Weldome Diroclross 

Meek H W bf McKinney Finella 

♦MeekH W bf Welcome Cyrene 

*Mosher 10 be Easter Aleue Cocur d'Alenc Allie Waggoner 

Nutwood Stock Farm ch f Nutwood Wilkes Brown Eyes 

Nutwood Stock Farm b c Nutwood Wilkes Black Line 

Nutwood Stock Farm ch f Klaiawati Queen C 

Nutwood Stock Farm bf T C Bessie 

Newman R O bl c My Direct Direct Daisy Basler 

Oakwood Park Stock Farm . b f Direct Bella II 

bl f Direct Cella Derby 

brc Direct Nazomn 

br f Direct Brilliant Shine 

b f , Chas Derby Addie Ash 

.blc Chas Derby Pippa 

,b c Chas Derby Bertha 

ch c Chas Derby Essie Farley 

br f Chas Derby Coquette 

.bl f Chas Derby Chipper Simmons 

brf ('has Derby Susie Mambrino 

.b f Owyhee Nannie Smith 

be Owyhee Inex 

.b f Steinway Maggie McGregor 

♦Orme T W b f Ziska Zolock Berlinda 

♦Owen C A bl f Direct Donna 

O'Grady K bf Hart Boswell Flora Grand 

Peterson UG bf Arballita Arthur W Dinah 

Peterson UG scDrFinlaw Daly Topsy 

Raucho Verde Co be Bulletneck Zombro Belle Raymon 

♦Rancho Verde Co be Indicator Zombro Lady Alice 

Rodman H B brc Cavalier McKinney Advocatrix 

♦Rodman H B be Culprit McKinney l-atty Washington 

♦Rodman II B bl f The Nun Bayswater Wilkes Patty Almont 

♦Rose Dale Stock Farm b f St Whips Fila D 

Rose Dale Stock Farm St Whips Zora 

♦Ramage George br f Welcome Abyssinia 

Santa Rosa Stock Farm b c McKinney Bonsaline 

Santa Rosa Stock Farm b c McKinney Carlotta Wilkes 

Santa Rosa Stock Farm b c McKinney Biscara 

Santa Rosa Stock Farm 1) c McKinney Stamboulita 

Santa Rosa Stock Farm bf McKinney By Guy 

Santa Rosa Stock Farm bf McKinney Adioo 

Santa Rosa Stock Farm b f McKinney Bye Bye 

Santa Rosa Stock Farm b c McKinney Rose Russell 

Santa Rosa Stock Farm b >idney Dillon Lilly Stanley 

Spreekels A B ch o Cupid. Galata 

Spreckels A B b f Cupid Lillie S 

Spreekels A B ch f Oupid Countess 

Steele C C br c Black Jack Belle R 

♦Shaw L E be Lugo Zolock Daisy Mason 

Spoor W L bf Neernut Mabel McKinney 

Smith Thos McKinney Daisy S 

Smith Thos Tom Smith Maud Washington 

Smith H B bf Ayeress Lynwood W May Ay res 

Spurgeon LB bcT istam Stam B Lizzie Ely 

Stevenson WG s c Capt John Tennysonian Fannie Putnam 

Sexton PH br c Welcome Wilkes Welcome Hera 

Shaw Geo E br f Altonia Alton Nellie Nutwood 

Topham E br c CHIT T Alton Blanche T 

Tuttle Bros b c Stam B Laurel 

Taylor JS br c Dusky Pilot Pilot Prince Dusky 

♦Uslar E E br c Diosma Diablo Nita 

Vance WL bf Horace Madeline 

Vanderhurst W b f Goldie Dietatus SalinasMaid 

Vendome Stock Farm bl c Marconi Boodle Much Better 

♦Williams CH scCollisH Nutwood Wilkes Net 

Williams JH blk f Zenut Neernut Dulcet 

Wills W LeMoyne Conifer Del Arno 

Wills W LeMoyne Conifer Bonnie Ela 

Wills W LeMoyne Conifer Del Ela 

Wills W LeMoyne Conifer Susanue K 

Wills W LeMoyne Zombro Anca 

Wills W LeMoyne Conifer Nopala 

♦Weil Jos ..sc Vinci Vinci Strathway Susie Hall 



IQH I 1 Second Payments of Sf; each were made January 
IdUl I 2. 1901, on the following Mares bred in 1901. 



Owner, and Mare Nominated. 



.Stallion Bred To. 



Armstrong G J, Gladys by Mambrino Chief Meridian 

Anderson J N, Nora D by Del Sur Charles Derby 

Arvedson C A. Lady Phelps by Waldstein Sutter 

Barstow T W. Princess Airlee by Prince Airlee. Wilkes Direct 
Baumgartner F A. Our Lady by Wilkes Direct. McKinney 

Beaver W J. Baby by Conn's Billy Zolock 

Beckers G T. Whisper by Almont Lightning — Stam B 
Bemmerly Sam, Belle Button by Alex Button . Diablo 

Bohon Jos H, lioellen by Happy Prince Zolock 

Bohon Jos H, Happy Belle by Happy Prince Zolock 

Borden I L, Allie Cresco by Cresco Robt I 

Borden I L. Alice Belle by Washington Robt I 

Brierly S, Hattie W by Alaska Nushagak 

Brown Alex. Nosegay by Langton Nushagak 

Brown Alex. Pioche by Dexter Prince Nushagak 

Brown It S. May Queen by Secretary Meridian 

Brown & Brandon, Media by Anteeo Meridian 

Brown & Brandon, Miss B by Ed Wilkes Meridian 

Byrne J F, Rosewood by Silkwood Zolock 

Carr J D, Flossie by Carr's Mambrino Boodle Jr 

Carr J D, Nancy by Mambrino Jr Boodle Jr 

Carr J D, Lildine by Boodle Nutwood Wilkes 

Carter Martin, Little Witch by Director Nutwood Wilkes 

Carter Martin, Ingar by Director Nutwood Wilkes 

Carter Martin, Zeta Carter by Director Nutwood Wilkes 

Carter Martin, Bessie C by Cal Nutwood Nutwood Wilkes 

Carter Martin, Lew G by Albert W T C 

Carter Martin, Lida W by Nutwood Zombro 

Carter Martin, Georgie B by Nutwood Wilkes. Zolock 

Chiles J F, Little Martin by Ross S Bayswater Wilkes 

Chiles J F. Lill by Whippleton Bayswater Wilkes 

Clayton E W, Mae Gill by Sidney McKinney 

Cohen A H, Alfredatta by Steiuway McKinney 

Ciraisto S, Hazel by Waldstein.. Monterey 

Crowley T J Lottie Parks by Cupid Boydcllo 

Curtis W S, Siren by Gen Wilkes Zolock 

Davidson A H, Dellnettie by Boydell Zolock 

Davies B, Gipsy by Gen Booth Zolock 

Davies B, lone by McKinney Nutwood Wilkes 

Davis W F. Tule by Dexter Prince Meridian 

Dickinson Jos, Everette by Nephew Nutwood Wilkes 

Dudley E D, Bee by Sterling Bayswater Wilkes 

Dudley E D, Babe by Dawnllght Capt Jones 

Durfee C A, Rose McKinney by McKinney Mendocino 

Durfee C A, Miss Jessie by Gossiper McKinney 

Edmonds J A, Lydia Payne by Cris S Neernut 

Erkenbrecher B, Galette Wilkes byJud Wilkes. McKinney 

Erlanger Edw, Fly by Pasha Strathway 

FarrarC W, Emallne by Electioneer Monbells 

Felt R, Rill Ray by Ira Mustapha 

Felt R. Pensie by Grand Moor Waldstein 

Freeman A C, Lady, s t b by Ioca Neernut 

Freeman A C. Hulda by Hawthorn Neernut 

Freeman A C, Lady Raymond by Raymond Nocruut 

Gannon Dennis, Katie G S by Crover Clay Nutwood Wilkes 

Gardner Jno W, Miracle by McKinney Wilkes Direct 

Gardner Jno W, Black Swan by Alta Vela Wilkes Direct 

Gommet F, Mamie Wilkes by Guy Wilkes McKinney 

Gott A O, Nancy by Engineer Nutwood Wilkes 

Greeley R P M. Winnie Wilkes by Rey Wilkes . McKinney 

Gri filth C L, Bon Bon by Slmmonds McKinney 

Gri tilth C L, Petrina by Pie imont Bonnie Direct 

Griffith C L. Alta Nola by Altamont Bonnie Direct 

Grissim W H, Queen by Whippleton Delphi 

Haggerty Geo J, Calista by Golden Dawn Stam B 

Haggerty Geo J, AM Bee by Ben Ali Stan B 

Halle J W & Co, Eva by Le Grande Demonio 

Haile J W & Co, May Norriss by Norriss Demonio 

Haile J W & Co Bay mare by Nutwood Wilkes Demonio 

Haile J W & Co. Hannah by Le Grande Demonio 

Harkey W S, Clara H by Hark . . : Diablo 

Heald E P, Honor by Fordstan Pilot Prince 

Heald E P. Princess McKinney by McKinney. . .Nutwood Wilkes 

Henry M, Bay mare by Silver Bow Educator 

Herbert Dr E F, Ferndale Queen by Longworth .Neil W 

Hogeboom Robt, Yolo Belle by Waldstein Wash McKinney 

Hughes Thos, Electra by Silkwood. McKinney 

Humfreville Mrs W B, Nellie by Mulvenna Iran Alto 

Hunt M T, Peggy by Berlin Zombro 

Huntley L L, Barcena by Lex Guy McKinney 

Irvine W J, Lady Ansley by Our Jack McKinney 



Owner, anil Mare Nominated. Stallion Bred To. 

Iverson J B, Salinas Belle by Carr's Vermont. Boodle Jr 

Iverson J B Belle by Kentucky Prince Iran Alto 

Iverson J B, Ivoneer by Eugeneer Nutwood Wilkes 

Iverson J B. Ruby by Irvington Chief Charles Derby 

Johnson J W, Annie by Kilarney Director Jr 

Jones, J A, Daisy Q Hill by Altamont Zombro 

Kavauagh Edw, Dolieau b'v Mambrino Chief Jr. Gafl Topsail 

King C E, Dolly G bv Clarence Wilkes Diawood 

Kingsbury Geo W, Flora by Magic, Lynmont 

LaugenourC F.Alexandra j by Alex'der Button Diablo 

La Siesta Ranch, Wanda by Eros McKinney 

Lasell L M. Belle Caprice by Steinway Silver Bow 

Lipson Mrs M. Miss Goldnut by Goldnut Native State 

L'pson. Mrs M, Linda Mac by McKinney Neernut 

Loorya Sol. Lady Marvin by" Don Marvin. Diawood 

Lumsden W H, Myrtle by Anteeo Bonnie Direct 

Lumsden W H, Roblet by Robin Bonnie Direct 

McAleerO, Eva Wilkes'by Adrian Wilkes McKinney 

McCune Wm, Lou Star by Brigadier Bonnie Direct 

McKee E H, Rebolludo by Wilduut Azmoor 

Maben W S, Bonnie Red by Red vVilkes McKinney 

Maben W S, Linnett by Electioneer..:.' Exioneer 

Markham A, Lady Bulger by Don Wash McKinney 

Marshall J W, Miss Glenn by Algona McKinney 

Martin Dr A H, Boy del la by Boydell Nushagak 

Martin S F, Mountain Maid by Cresco McKinney 

Masoero Dr C, La Muscovite by Guy Wilkes. . . .McKinney 

Mastin W, Miss Mooney Filly by Brigadier Falrose 

Mercer E S, Angelina by Silver Bow Daedalion 

Mercer E S, Kitty Vernon by Mount Vernon. . . Silver Bow 

Meek H W, Cricket, by Steinway Nutwood Wilkes 

Meek H W, Fenella by Fallis McKinney 

Meek H VV, Edwina by Sydney Welcome 

Meek II W, Rosemary by Nutwood Wilkes Welcome 

Meek H W. Pansy by Nutwood Wilkes Wm Harold 

Meek H W, Directress by Direct Wm Harold 

Minturn Jas W, Perfection Ilderim 

Minturn Jas VV, Carma by Mt Hood Strathway 

Minturn Jas W, Edna VV by Lynwood Teheran 

Minturn Jas W, Ramona by Alonzo Hayward.. .Teheran 

Mitchell S U, Jennie Winston by Altamont Zombro 

Montgomery S, Hattie B by Alex Button Bayswater Wilkes 

Montgomery J E. Nancy II by Upstart Bayswater Wilkes 

Morris Geo II, Algenie by Algona Bayswater Wilkes 

Moore H P, Etta by Naubuc Boxwood 

Moore H P. Nettie Elwood by Adrian Boxwood 

Moorhead R I, Anna Belle by Dawn Hamb Wilkes 

Morgan Wm, Grace McK by McKinney Neernut 

Morgan Wm, Una K by McKinney Neernut 

Morgan Wm. Nellie K by Gen Grant Jr Newton Direct 

Moriarty B I), Kate Kearney by Speculation Scott McKinney 

Mosher I C, Athalono by Cieur d'Alene Zombro 

Mosher I C, Catinka by Abbotsford McKinney 

Mowry JosC, Electress W'lk'sby N'tw'd W'lk's McKinney 

Murphy M A. Alaska by Woolsey McKinney 

Newman R O, Dewdrop Basler by Robt Basler. .Zombro 

NIchollsGeo V, Betty by Pilot Prince Nutwood Wilkes 

Oakwood Park S V. Pr incess by Administrator. Chas Derby 

Oakwood Park S F. lone by Ferguson Chas Derby 

O'kw'd l"k S F, Chipper Simmons by Mamb Boy , Chas Derby 
O'kw'd P'k S F, Susie M ambrino by Mamb Boy. .Chas Derby 

Oakwood Park S F, Naulakha by Balkan Chas Derby 

Oakwood Park S F, Pippa by Stilleco Owyhee 

Oakwood Park S F, Bertha by Alcantara Owyhee 

Oakwood Park S F, Babe Marion by Steinway. .Rev Direct 

Off J W A, (iorgie by Enfield Neernut 

Owen A.Zadie McGregor by Robt McGregor. . A t hadon 

Owen C A, Aroda Nazote 

Parks S D. iDliue by Hambletonian Wilkes Monterey 

Peart E C. Buchu by Buchanan Diawood 

Peckham B L. Azrose by Azmoor Nutwood Wilkes 

Powers L O, Hinda by A VV Richmond Rex Gilford 

Pratt A. Scappoose by Roy Wilkes Zombro 

Rancho Verde Co, Vashti by Vasto Zolock 

Rancho Verde Co Maybroaker by Nutbreaker Zolock 
Rancho Verde Co, Leonora McKinney by Mc- 
Kinney Neernut 

Rancho Verde Co, Rosebud Rex Gilford 

Reeves J E, Beulah by Altamont Zombro 

Rico J D, Genevive by Arthur Wilkes Diawood 

Ricks C C, Fatinltza by Pascora Hayward McKinney 



Owner, and Mare Nominated. Stallion Bred To. 

Roberts E D Colton Maid by Maxmillian Zolock 

Rodman A B. Lady Armington by Anteeo McKinney 

Rogers C E. Ruby by Selby Chief Rex Gilford 

Roper SI, Dolly by Redwood Scott McKinney 

Rosedale Stock Farm. Dalia by Daly Wash McKinney 

Rosedale Stock Farm, Darian by Daly Wash McKinney 

Rosenhaum H A. Emma R by Electioneer Bonnie Direct 

Rounds F, Lady Thorn by Billy Thornhill Zombro 

Runyon Mrs Sol, Coressa by Dexter Prince Mendocino 

Ruuyon Mrs Sol, Dextress by Dexter Prince Exioneer 

Runyon Mrs Sol, Altowood by Altivo Azmoor 

Rutherford G Jr Rotta by Director Neil W 

Santa Rosa Stock Farm, Bye Bye by Nutwood Sidney Dillon 
Santa Rosa S F, Lilly Stanley by Whippleton Sidney Dillon 

Santa Rosa S F. Biscara bv Director Sidney Dillon 

Santa RosaS F.Carlotta Wilkes by Chas Wilkes.Sidney Dillon 

Santa Rosa S F, Bv Guy by Guy Wilkes Sidney Dillon 

Santa Rosa S F, Adioo by Guy Wilkes Sidney Dillon 

Simla Rosa S V, Guycura by Guy Wilkes . Sidney Dillon 

Santa Rosa S F. Nordica Exioneer 

Scott S G. Lady Dudley by Anteeo Illustrious 

Scott S <;, Dolly Phillips, sire unknown Illustrious 

Scott Wm V, Fandango by Boswell Jr Scott McKinney 

Sexton P H. Hera bv Mambrino Wilkes Monterey 

Sherman Q C. Flirt by Hart Boswell Neil W 

Shaw Ceo E. Nellie Nutwood by Brown Jug — Benton Boy 

Shaw L E, Daisy Mason by Bob Mason Jr Zolock 

Shippce W A. Susie bv Dictator Wilkes Bonnie Direct 

Smith Thos, Daisy S by McDonald Chief McKinney 

Smith Thos, Maud Washington by Geo Wash- 
ington Capt Jones 

Smith VV VV, Lady Clara by Altamont Vinmont 

Smith Chas A, Pansy A by Sidney Arnett Senator L 

Solano Alfred, Nashawona bv Baron Wilkes .. Sky Pointer, Jr 

Solano Alfred, Etta Wilkes by Biliy Sayre Sky Pointer, Jr 

Solano Alfred, El Mac by Electricity. . McKinney 

Solano Alfred. Vista by Electricity McKinney 

Spoor VV L, Mabel McKinney by McKinney Neernut 

Spurgeon L B. Lizzie Ely bs Illustrious Stam B 

Stephenson 1) It Victoria S by Roy Moore Bonnie Direct 

St ickle ( ! E. Alaska Filly by Silver Bow Daedal Ion 

Stickle G E, Cornelia by Cornelius Sliver Bow 

Streiuing M .1, Maud P by Idaho Patchen Wash McKinney 

Straining M J. Dinorah by Dexter Prince Wash McKinney 

Strong N M, May Kinney bv Silkwood Zolock 

Thayer C II, Lee Crowell by Del Sur Rex Gilford 

Thisby R F. Hilda Rose by Dawn Nushagak 

Thomas VV F. Sallie by Ploasautou Nutwood Wilkes 

Thomas VV F, Russet bv Rustic McKinnej 

Thorniiuost C O, Miss Peacock by Stublofleld's 

Patchen McKinney 

Todhunter L II, Silver Bell by Silver Bow Zombro 

Todhunter L H, Itella by Sydney Zombro 

Topham E, Electlonita bv Albert W Billy Thornhill 

Tuttle Bros, Laurel by Nephew Stam B 

Truesdell E I', Cifl bv A I ban Zolock 

Truesdell EC, Zenaido by Piedmont Neernut 

Tuttle Dr J, Maisie bv Planter Zombro 

Tuttle Dr.), Kismet bv Planter Malheur 

Vance VV L. Elisa S by Alcantara Jr Diablo 

Vanderhurst Wm, Salinas Maid by .Innio McKinney 

Wadham F VV, Johannah Treat by Thomas 

Rydsk Neernut 

Warlow Ceo L, Athalie by Hurkaway Strathway 

Warlow Ceo L, Lustrine by Onward Athablo 

Warlow Ceo L, Donnalrine by A thadon Athablo 

Warlow Ceo L. Cora Wickersham bv Junio A thadon 

Wellington Jr B F. Miss Leah bv Rajah Nutwood Wilkes 

Williams C II. Twenty-third by Director McKinney 

Williams Mrs P J, Egyptian Maid by Egyptian 

Prince Monterey 

Williams I' .1, Leap Year bv Tempest Monterey 

Williams P .1. So So bv Tempest Monterey 

Wills W LeM, Bonnie Ela by Bonnie McGregor. Conifer 

Wills W LeM, Pastora bv Judge Salisbury Conifer 

Wills VV LeM, Lunanca bv Dashwood Conifer 

Wills W LeM. Anca bv Conifer Zolock 

Willson A C. Little One by Benton Boy Dictates Medium 

Winter Chas W, Black Bess by Del Sur Jr Andy McKinney 

Wempe G. Belle VV by Director Nutwood Wilkes 

Zipsoy F, Altamont Maid by Altamont Zombro 



6 



[January 11, 100 



THE WEEKLY 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

F. W. KELLEY, PROPRIETOR. 

riirf and Sporting Authority of the Pacific Coast. 

— OFFICE — 

36 GEARY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

P. O- BOX 2300. 



Terma— One Year S3, Six Months SI. 75, Three Months SI 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Money should be sent by postal order, draft or by registered letter 
addressed to F. \V. Kelley, 36 Geary St., San Francisco. Cal. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's name and 
address, not necessarily for publication, but as a private guarantee 
of good faith. 

G. G. TUKK1 & CO., Agents. Subscription and advertising. 

Salisbury Building, Melbourne, Australia 



San Francisco, Saturday, January n, 1002. 



pvIUECTORS OF the breeders associa- 

tion will meet at the ofllce of the Breeder and 
Sportsman during the week of January 20th, and at 
that meeting a date for the Summer meeting of the 
association will bo selected and some big early closing 
purses announced for the slow classes. This will be 
good news for harness horse owners and trainers, and 
will start the harness racing season of 1002 in Califor- 
nia oil in good shape. Many district associations are 
getting ready to announce dates and purses also by 
February 1st. Horsemen can make calculations on 
plenty of harness races for good purses this year. 



IT IS OF THE UTMOST IMPORTANCE that the 
I District Boards of Agriculture intending to give a 
race meoting this year should make a public announce- 
ment to that effect at the earliest possible date. The 
reason that there were so few horses on the circuit 
last year was because the Associations in California 
waited too long before declaring their intentions of giv- 
ing meetings, and many owners, being in doubt as to 
whether or not the,y would have racing enough to 
warrant the expense, did not train their horses. 
Others, who would have preferred to have raced here, 
having no positive assurance of a circuit in California, 
were compelled, if they wanted to race, to make en. 
tries in the eastern stakes, the entries to the impor- 
tant ones closing while the prospect here looked very 
dubious. The result was that the best horses and 
many of the best known trainers, whose presence 
would have added greatly to the interest and success 
of our district meetings, were most conspicuous by 
their absence. The management of some of the meet- 
ings on the circuit, while intending to have a fair and 
race meeting, did not announce it and declare their 
datos for fear they would not get as large a bonus sub. 
scribed by their local business men as they could by 
whipping them into line through telling them that if 
they did not pay up liberally they would get no fair. 
A very mistaken policy, as by getting out early and 
taking a dato and enthusiastically booming their meet- 
ing the receipts from other sources would have made up 
many fold what little difference they could scare out of 
a few grasping townspeople, who would be benefited by 
a meeting, into giving more than could be wheedled 
out of them through threats of "no money, no races." 
Other things conspired to make last year a bad 
one for the circuit. One was that a number of 
Districts left their appropi iation from the State for 
that year so as to draw it for two years and give 
a larger fair in 1902. All that is needed to make 
this the most successful year for the fairs and 
race meetings that we have had on this Coast since 
the heyday of the good old times is the immediate 
and concerted action of our District Boards in 
the formation of circuits, harmonious selection of 
dates, amounts to be given in purses and premi- 
ums and tho return to a betting system where 
the public makes the odds and the stake holder is not 
interested in the result. The latter is considered by 
every one to be of vital importance and by many to bo 
the leading cause of the loss of attendance and interest 
in our trotting meetings. It is true that the book- 
maker has been able to pay big prices for betting 
privileges and that a stated sum of large magnitude 
and cash in advance has been most seductive to Boards 
of Directors with a prospect of having to go down 
into their individual pockets to make up a deficit. But 
to those who have studiod the situation it looks like 
the proposition of the penny on the end of the nose 
obscuring tho dollar within arm's reach. A return to 
the auction and mutuel pools will be a return of confi- 
dence and large attendance, big money from tho gate, 
larger receipts for entrance to races and for other 
pi-iyileges. It has been most conclusively demonstrated 



that the kind of bookmaking we have had at our 
District meetings is bad for the fairs and sometimos 
bad for the books. The bettors do not like tho odds 
and look with suspicion on tho books; consequently 
many do not attend the meeting and the bookmakers 
are forced in some instances to pay such large amounts 
for the privilege that they are compelled to make 
cinch books to play oven. There is a general demand 
for the return of tho old system of auctions and 
mutuels particularly on harness races. Tho horsemen 
want it, claiming that the books refuse to take their 
money if they stand a show to win and tho man who 
wants to make a bet larger than $2 or $5 frequently 
finds it difficult to place his money under the present 
system of syndicate bookmaking at any reasonable 
odds. 



ALL THE BORSES, mares, colts and fillies of the 
Sonoma Stock Farm, tho property of the late J. 
B. Chase, Esq., are to be sold at auction in this city on 
Tuesday, February 4th. This is an absolute dispersal 
sale as every hoot on the place is to be sold. Many 
famous thoroughbreds have been bred on this well 
known farm. From tho Chase paddocks have come 
Hidalgo, who won many memorablo races both at the 
East and iu California; Gilead, winner of the Thornton 
and other stakes and conqueror of Roy El Santa Anita, 
Hawthorne, etc.; DoBracey, who beat the best three 
year olds in tho Middle West and California and ran a 
mile in 1:40; Monterey, one of tho crack two year olds 
of 1894, sired by Hidalgo; Marigold, who ran a mile in 
1:41, two miles in 3:30A and four miles in 7:20], the 
world's race record for mares; Centella, winner of 
twelve races and $9205; Kildare, winner of more than 
twenty races; Morven, a heavy winnor on tho fiat and 
over the sticks; Del Norte, who broke the Coast record 
at a mile and a sixteenth; Top Gallant, winner of four- 
teen races and "iu the money" on fifty-three occasions; 
Horatio, a good two and three year old; Phoebe Ann, 
a winner East and West; Mischief, a stake winner and 
producer; Glen Ellen, a winner and phenomenal pro- 
ducer; Mystery, who won three Derbys and took the 
measure of Geraldine and Acclaim; Manzanillo, who 
won two races at Sacramento in 1898 and defeated the 
famous Libertine; Rebecca, a winner and one of the 
most wonderful producors alive; Marian, her sister, a 
good winner and the mother of Sir John, Sykeston, 
Lady Marian, etc., and Modwena, a stake winner and 
many others. The sale will bo held at the old Killup 
& Co. salesyard, 1732 Market street in this city. Mr. 
W. H. Hord will conduct the sale. 



THE BROODMARES that will be sent to the auc- 
tion ring in this city on the 30th instant by Palo 
Alto Stock Farm are a grand lot. There are but 
twenty fivo mares and three stallions catalogued and 
it shouid not take an auctioneer more than half an 
hour to sell them at good prices, if tho horso breeders 
of this State are wise, as there will be a bargain in 
every mare sold. The list is not long, but what it 
lacks in quantity it makes up in quality and that is the 
principal thing necessary in horse breeding. Among 
tho producing mares to bo sold are Anselma 2:29i by- 
Ansel, Elsie (dam of five in tho list by General Benton), 
Lady Agnes by Electioneer, Ladywell 2:1(U by Elec- 
tioneer, Morning Glory by Electioneer, Nellie Benton 
by General Benton and Wildmay by Electioneer. 
There are several young mares that, are elegantly bred 
and splendid individuals. The throe stallions to be 
sold are Azmoor 2:20i, Altower and Menzie. Azmoor 
is a son of Electioneer and tho thoroughbred mare 
Mamie C. that produced two standard trotters. He is 
tho sire of Botonica 2:10J, one of the haudsomest stal- 
lions in America, of Azmon 2:13J, Rowena 2:17, Bouni- 
bel 2:1 7 J and several othors with fast records. Altower 
is a four year old by Altivo 2:18$, brother to Palo 
Alto, and Menzie is a three year old by Mendocino 
2:19) out of Lizzie by Wildidle, second dam Lizzie 
Miller by St. Clair 05(5, third dam by St. Clair 16,075. 
The dam of Menzio has produced three in the list. 
This sale will take place at the Occidental Horso Ex. 
change on Thursday, January 30th, beginning at 

11 A. M. 

IT MAY INTEREST CALIFORNIANS who are 
1 interested in the future of our district fairs and 
harness racing to know that there is a movement 
among the thoroughbred horse breeders of New York 
and vicinity to have laws passed by the Legislature of 
that State which will prohibit bookmaking and confine 
the betting on running races there to Paris mutuols. 
One of the prominent racing dailies has taken the 
matter up, though none of the later advocates of the 
plan have presented tho arguments and points that 
have boon advanced by that excellent journal, the 
Rider and Driver, which has advocated the change for 
some time. Every person who studies tho racing 
situation from tho standpoint of thfse who are inter- 
ested in breeding and racing for true sport is aware of 
the fact that bookmaking is injuring this great sport 
and bringing it into disrepute. 



THE YEAR BOOK of tho Gentlemen's Driving Club 
of Cleveland has been issued and our thanks are 
duo tho club for a copy. This is volume 5 of the series 
and is not only a very beautifully printed volume but 
is handsomely and profusely illustrated. The book is 
compiled by George A. Schneider, who has done his 
work very carefully and creditably. There are de- 
scriptions and complete summaries of all the matinees 
of 1901, and alphabetical lists of all tho members of the 
club and the horses owned by them with their records. 
The club's trotting record is now 2:06ij, this remark- 
able performance having been accomplished by the 
peerless wagon trotter, John A. McKerron, the Cali- 
ifornia bred son of Nutwood Wilkes 2:16}. This is also 
the world *s best record of a trotter to a wagon driven 
by an amateur. This horse has also earned for the 
club the honor of winning the Boston Challenge 
Trophy two years in succession, defeating the crack 
wagon trotters of the country. The Gentlemen's 
Driving Club of Cleveland has done and is doing a 
great work in making matinee racing the greatest of 
American sports as they absolutely divorce it from all 
gambliug features. 



READ THE LIST of high class horses to bo sold at 
the Fasig-Tipton Midwinter Horse Auction 
which is to be held at Madison Square Garden, New 
York from January 27th to February 1st. California 
breeders who desire to get new and fashionable blood 
for their farms should send for catalogues and pick out 
some of the good things to be offered, as it is easy to 
send on a commission to purchase, and it costs com- 
paratively little to bring horses to California. The 
great young stallion Oakland Baron 2:09} by Baron 
Wilkes is in the consignment; Delmarch 2:11) by Ham- 
brino out of a mare by Geo. Wilkes is also to be sold; 
Castleton 2: 10J by Wilton, Advertiser 2:15}, Axtello 
2:15 and other grandly bred stallions and trotters are 
catalogued. There are roadsters and race horses and 
many of the best bred mares in America in tho list. 
Now is the time to buy the best that is offered at the 
sales. Values are on the rise and tho demand cannot 
be supplied for years to come. California needs new 
eastern blood. Wo are getting some but we need 
more. The Fasig-Tipton sales offer the opportunity 
to get it. 



A N IMPROVEMENT has been made in the appear- 
ance of that excellent journal, the Rural Spirit of 
Portland, Oregon. In beginning a new volume on the 
first of the year it donned a new heading, which is 
not only neat and artistic, but a great improvement 
over the old one which has becomo so familiar to the 
readers of the paper. Under the editorship of Mr. 
M. D. Wisdom the Rural Spirit has become one of tho 
best papers devoted to live stock and horse news pub 
lished in this country. 



THE AMERICAN DERBY, $20,000 ADDED, with 
many other rich stakes offered by the Washing- 
ton Park Club of Chicago will close on Wednesday 
noxt, January 15th. Don't let the date go by without 
making entries in these stakes. They are among the 
most valuable in America. A complete list, with con- 
ditions, etc., will be found in our advertising columns. 



WM. G. LAYNG, tho well known horseman, has 
selected and will ship to Japan on the City of 
Pokin to-day the following thoroughbred stallions: 
Imp. Mistral II., imp. Prospector and Alkoran by 
imp. Duncombo. These stallions are royally bred and 
absolutely sound, and a finer trio were never shipped 
to the Orient. 

Correction in Futurity Stakes Payments. 

In the lists of payments in tho Pacific Breeders 
Futurity Stakes, printed on the 5th page of thit issue 
of tho Breeder and Sportsman, there is an error. 

In the stake for mares bred in 1901, W. W. Smith's 
second payment should have been credited to the mare 
Maggie by Altamont, bred to Vinmont instead of 
Lady Clara bred to the same horse. Mr. Smith had 
both mares entered, and made second payment on 
Maggie. In making up the list this payment was 
wrongfully credited to Lady Clara. 



Spirit of the West, an excellent journal devoted to 
horse interests will issue a Blue Ribbon Holiday Edi- 
tion January 15th. It will bo sent to any address for 
15 cents, or tho holiday edition and a copy of the paper 
will be sent for one yoar for one dollar. See advertise- 
ment. 

Two fine Perchoron stallions are offered for sale by 
H B. Goecken, the well known hay and grain mer- 
chant of this city whose place of business is at 585 
Fourth street. See advertisement in this issue. 

Jackson's Napa Soda does not tangle the feet I 



January 11, 1902] 



Jockey Taral on the Weight Question. 

The subject of raising the weights in all races has 
)een dilated upon to some extent, showing the benefits 
that would surely arise if secretaries would only rnako 
it a rule to live closer to the regulation scale than they 
have done in the past. 

In a conversation held by Ed Cole with Fred Taral 
on the matter, the jockey claims, and justly too, that 
many races are not truly run through interferences 
caused by bits of pin headed boys who know enough 
only to sit on horses and nothing about tho art of race 
riding. He is very decided in his opinion that if the 
example set by Austria and California were followed 
here, where the jockeys are thorough horsemen, with 
few exceptions, there would be less accidents and that 
horses would run truer and more satisfactory to the 
public eye and pleasing to the otlicials. 

In illustrating his argument, Taral says: 'Take any 
race at a mile or a mile and a sixteenth on a circular 
track and watch the jumble and mixing up that takes 
place at the first turn. There is so much crowding 
and jostling that I have leen horses literally carried 
off their feet and held in the air for thirty or forty 
yards. . 

"The little bits of boys know nothing but racing to 
the front and in doing so let go of the heads of their 
mounts and they naturally work toward the rail. The 
result is crowding that is not only dangerous to horses 
and riders, but causes horses to be frozen out of posi- 
tion which cannot be recovered, hence inconsistency in 
running horses which is looked upon with suspicion by 
the officials and public. 

"No good rider will make a bid for a position on the 
first turn in a big field unless he gets away in the first 
three, especially if he has a rail position at the post, 
for he is sure to be shut off by some inexperienced 
l'ider, and it is much better to wait for clear railing 
than be compelled to pull up a horse or have him cut 
down. 

"The same state of affairs also exists in other parts 
of a race. I have seen a pin-head boy race his horse 
around his field on the backstretch and hit a half 
dozen horses as he brushes by them. On the far turn, 
too, these little boys frequently cut too short, which 
will throw the inside horses back. Older and experi- 
enced jockeys never do tkis unless it is intentional, as 
they know tho danger of such a proceeding. 

"There is nothing more disappointing for the public 
to see horses in which they are interested shut off, and 
to this the defeat of many horses that should win can 
be attributed. In Austria there is no crowding. 
Should a horse accidentally swerve toward another his 
rider will immediately apologize and pull away as soon 
as possible. Accidents are of very rare occurrence and 
when every care is taken of a horse by a rider the 
chances of having his mount cut down is reduced to a 
minimum. All this is due to the strict rules in regard 
to crowding and the gentlemanly conduct of the 
jockeys. 

"Then in this country all the older riders have 
respect for each other. Whenever I rode with Garri- 
son, Turner, Daggett, Littlefield and tho e in the older 
division we would always avoid crowding as much as 
possible. 

"With the weights raised there would be many more 
proficient horsemen riding and better racing would 
result. The lightweight custom in this country is not 
beneficial to the sport. It throws the entire proceed- 
ings into an atmosphere of luck. As I said before, I 
think the sport would be more satisfactory from a 
public standpoint if jockies were given more opportun- 
ities to ride after they had become thoroughly accom- 
plished horsemen." 

In looking over the past records of riders, some of 
whom might be riding to-day had they been offered 
inducements to keep within a limit of 120 pounds, there 
appears such competent men as Garrison, J. McLaugh- 
lin, "Monk" Overton, H. Lewis, Clayton, H. Griffin, 
F. Littlefield, L. Reiff, W. Simms, R. Williams, C. 
Weber, in fact, many others who have dropped out of 
sight because they wore not given sufficient oppor- 
tunity so follow the calling with profit. 

Next season there will be just about a half dozen 
boys who might be called good riders, Turner, Burns 
O'Connor, Cochrane, Wonderly, Shaw, Woods and 
Spencer. Of these Turner and Shaw only can be con- 
sidered as really proficient horsemen to be depended 
upon. No matter what horses they ride it inlluences 
the quotations of bettors, which is tho greatest proof 
to offer of their standing in the jockey world. 

Riders that will soon bo forgotten are Odom, Mounce, 
Cochrane, Bullman, Turner, H. Lewis and Williams, 
among others who have to injuro their constitutions 
to koep down anywhere near riding weight. All these 
are good horsemen and could be retained in tho field 
if given a chance to earn sufficient to keep body and 
soul together. It is the scarcity of such ridors that 
causes the fabulous prices to bo paid for the services of 
a good jockey. 



The idea of an oighty-pound boy being paid $18,000 
for a retaining fee, and the sum J. R. Keene is to pay 
Shaw is simply fabulous when it is considered that 
$25,000 was offered for his services by another party. 

Supposing some of the old timers were riding now 
America could boast of a collection of riding talent un- 
equaled in the world, including Garrison, McLaughlin, 
Griffin. Overton, Taral, Clayton, L. Reiff, R. Williams, 
Lewis, Turner, Burns, O'Connor, Shaw, Wonderly, 
Odom, Bullman, Spencer, Woods, Mounce, Cochrane, 
Daggett and others. 

Just think this over, gentlemen of tho Jockey Club. 



Monterey Colt Stakes. 

The horse broeders of Montorey county do not seem 
to have bred many pacers during the last few years, 
as of the four slakes for trotting and pacing colts 
offered by the district association, only those for the 
trotters filled. The two year old trotting stako has 
eight entries and the three year old stako six entries. 
The two year old paco had but two colts entered while 
there was one lone entry for tho three year old pacing 
stake. Following are the ontrios for tho stakes filled: 

TWO YEAR OLD TROTTING STAKE. 

J. D. Carr's s c Rod Rogue by Dictatus, dam Eunique 
by Mambrino (Carr's) 1789. 

J. D. Carr's s f Kitty S. by Nutwood Wilkes, dam 
Flossie by Mambrino 1789. 

J. D. Carr's s f Quoen Mab by Nutwood Wilkes, dam 
Nina B. by Electioneer. 

J. D. Carr's b c Gold Coin by Boodle Jr., dam Isa- 
bella by . 

J. B. Iverson's b f Amy I. by Diablo, dam Amy Fay 
by Anteeo. 

Wm. Vanderhurst's b' c Dover by Dictatus, dam 
Lilly V. by Junio. 

Wm. Vanderhurts's b c Sidney V. by Dictatus, dam 
Eugenia V. by Eusrenoer. 

George E. Shaw's blk c Cheechaka by Alta Rio, 
dam Nellie Nutwood by Brown Jug. 

THREE YEAR OLD TROTTING STAKE. 

J. D. Carr's ch g Larkin W. by Boodle Jr., dam 
Isabella by . 

J. B. Iverson's b f Ruble by Altamont, dam Ruby 
by Irvington Chief. 

C. Z. Hebert's b c by Alta Rio, dam Dolly by Ajax. 

C. Z. Hebert's b c by Alto Rio, dam Altoonita by 
Altoona. 

Worthington Parsons' s f May Queen by Eugeneer, 
dam Gypsy by Erwin Davis. 

R. P. Lathrop's b c Airlie Wilkes by Prince Airlio, 
dam Susie Hunter. 

To Revise Harness Rules. 

A joint committee, consisting of Major P. P. John- 
ston, President of the National Trotting Association, 
and W. P. Ijams, President of the American, will 
meet in New York this month to discuss amendments 
to the rules, so that so far as it is possible the codes of 
the two associations shall be alike. The presidents will 
in all probability be accompanied by their respective 
secretaries, W. II. Gocher and J. H. Steiner. 

The American Association was formed in 1887 by a 
convention consisting of 70 representatives of associa- 
tions which had been affiliated with tho National, but 
had become dissatisfied with the oxecutivo manage- 
ment at that time; that they had no fault to find with 
the National's codo of law was proved when the con. 
vention adoptod them bodily. Later on, however, the 
congress of each association made changes which be- 
came confusing to the ordinary horseman who raced 
his stable under both set of rules, and it was finally 
decided that tho presidents of tho two associations, 
prior to a meeting of a congress, should meet and ox- 
change views, so that if not the letter, tho spirit of 
any new legislation by tho two associations should be 
in harmony. It is well understood that the settlomont 
of the status of tho amateur records will be tho prin- 
cipal subject of discussion. — American Simiimutin. 

Good Horses For Sale. 

Rose Dale Stock Farm, at Santa Rosa, has fiftoon or 
twenty young horses, broken singlo and double, for 
sale. They are by the farm's stallions Daly 2:15 and 
St. Whips, son of Whips, tho sire of Azoto 2:04:j. 
These horses are all good individuals, natural trotters, 
and there are some excellent speed prospects among 
them, as well as extra good roadsters. A few well bred 
broodmares by Daly are also for salo. Daly, it must 
bo remembored, is by Gen. Benton, the best broodmare 
sire ever at Palo Alto, and is out of Dolly, the dam of 
Dolly Dillon 2:07, by Electioneer. * 

A Doctor's Endorsement. 

Dr. Wm. H. Fuller of Brooklyn, N. Y., writes ns follows: "My 
trainer bas been using Qulon's Ointment, and I must say It lias 
given entiro satisfaction It is truly a wonderful remedy. This Is 
one more clincher for Qutnn's Ointment, which is betas used by tho 
leading breeders and horsemen from Maine to California. For 
curbs, splints, spavins, windputts and all bunches take no substi- 
tute. If you cannot obtain from your druggist, it will be sent by 
mall or express, prepaid, for one dollar. Address W. B. Eddy & 
Co., Whitehall, N. Y. 



Nutwood as a Broodmare Sire. 

While tho information relating to the blood lines of 
the dams of the new 2:30 trotters and pacers is as yet 
very incomplete— in fact, remains so up to the date of 
publication of the official year book— yet enough in- 
formation is now at hand to give an intelligent idea of 
tho blood lines that havo shown up to the best advan- 
tage through the female line, writes Palmer W. Clark. 
The following list gives the horses that have sired the 
dams of fivo or more new 2:30 performers during tho 



season of 1901: 

Nutwood 2:18y by Belmont 23 

Onward 8:35k by George WilUes 2:22 16 

Red Wilkes 2:10 by George Wilkes 2:22 12 

Dictator by Ilambletonian 

Strathmore by Ilambletonian 

Kentucky Prince by Clark Chief 8 

Robert McGregor 2: 1714 by Major Edsall 2:29 8 

Belmont by Abdullah 1"> 7 

Blue Bull by Fruden's Blue Bull 7 

Egbert by Ilambletonian 7 

Happy Medium 2:2.1 by Ilambletonian 7 

Gambettn Wilkes 2:I9« by George Wilkes 2:22 6 

Electioneer by Ilambletonian 6 

Piedmont 2:17"i by Almont 5 

Chimes 2:30J£ by Electioneer 5 

Director 2:17 by Dictator 5 

Harold by Ilambletonian 5 

Pilot Medium by Happy Medium 5 



It will be seen that Nutwood, as he did last year, 
heads the list of sires of producing dams. This now 
gives him a total of 177 standard performers that have 
been produced by his daughters and places him so far 
ahead of his nearest competitor as to be in a class by 
himself. In days gone by it used to be considered 
that the Hambletonian blood was all right in tho malo 
line, but the female line should be either Mambrino, 
Pilot Jr., Clay, American Star, or other lines that 
"nicked" successfully with the blood of Ilambletonian. 
An examination of this list, however, shows the Ham- 
bletonian blood almost exclusively. Of the eighteen 
sires enumerated six of them, or one-third, are sons of 
Hambletonian; eight more wore sired by his sons; two 
were his grandsons, leaving just two to represent out- 
side families — a remarkable showing indeed. 



Superintendent Geo. W. Berry reports the first 
thoroughbred foal of the year— at Mr. A. B. Sprockels' 
Napa Stock Farm. It is a filly by Libertine (holder of 
the world's record of 1:38$ on a circular track from 
1894 to 1900) out of Grace S., a daughter of imp. Cyrus 
out of imp. Getaway. The new arrival is a handsome 
looking and well proportioned little miss. Libertine 
has filled out and is one of the handsomest horses in 
America to-day. When his get are put on the market 
they should bring good prices, as there are no better 
bred stallions than he. 



St. Aronicus, a four year old stallion by tho unbeaten 
Stl Simon, which was purchased by Chas. L. Fair 
recently in England, will arrive in a few days and be 
sent to Mr. Fair's ranch in Lake county. The colt 
cost a large sum, as St. Simon is the highest priced 
stallion and, at present, the most fashionable in tho 
world. 

Gents' driving mare, by Nushagak, fast trotter and 
thoroughly broken, is offered for sale. See advertise- 
ment. 

A Waldstein mare, six years old and very gentlo, is 
offered for salo by an advertiser in this issue. 



Like all good things, Jackson's Napa Soda hasa 
dozen counterfeits. Watch out I 



EFFECTUAL 

The moit effectual remedy in use for 
the cure of ailments of horses and cattle is 

GOMBAULT'S 

CAUSTIC BALSAM 




This preferred remedy is prepared ex- 
clusively by J. B. Gombault, ex-Veterinary 
Surgeon to the French Government Stud. 



As a III M w REMEDY for Rhen- 

111 11 "in. N 1 ■ / .■ 1 1 1 - , More Tin-out, t'U'., it 
Is Invaluable. 

Every bottle of Cauftlc Balaam *«td H 
Warranted t» sat Miu-ii.Mi. Price $l..'tO 
per bottle. Sold by <lrut«rixts, or Kent by ex- 
press, charges paid, with lull directions lor its 
use. Send for descriptive circulars, testimo- 
nials, etc. AddfVM 

THE LA WHENCE- WILLIAMS COMPANY, Cleveland, Ohio. 



8 ®itu Qvttbex axxh grpjortsmmt 

1 ROD, GUN AND KENNEL. i 

j$l Conducted by J. X. I>e WITT. 



Coming Events. 



lienrli Shown. 

Jan. 8. 9, 10. II— Hoosicr Poultry and Kennel Association Bench 
show. Sol D. Brandt. Secretary Logansport, Ind. 

Feb. 4. 5, 6— Rhode Island Kennel Club. Annual bench show. 
Providence, R. I. George D. Miller, Secretary. 

Feb. 11, 12 13, U— Westminster Kennel Club. James Mortimer 
Superintendent, New York City. 

Feb. 26-March 1— Duquesne Kennol Club of Western Pennsyl- 
vania. F. S. Stedman, Secretary, Pittsburg, Pa. 

Field Trials. 

Dec. 11-KentucUy Field Trial Club. 2nd annual trials. Glas- 
gow, Ky. Dr. F. W. Samuel. Secretary, Louisville. Ky. 

Dec. Wisconsin State Field Trial Association. Inaugural 

trials. ..Wis. O. W. Gothke, Secretary, Grand Rapids, Wis. 

Jan. 13— Pacific Coast Field Trial Club lUth annual trials 
Santa Maria. Cal. A. Betz, Secretary. 201 Parrott Bldg, S. F., Cal 

Jan 20— United States Field Trial Club. Annual trials. Grand 
Junction, Tenn. W. S. Stafford, Secretary, Trenton, Tenn. 

Feb. 3— Alabama Field Trial Club. Fifth annual trials. Madi- 
son, Ala. T. H. Spencer, Secretary-treasurer. 

Feby. 8— Continental Field Trial Club. Aunual trials Grand 
Junction. Tenn. Theo. Sturgis, Secretary, Greenfield Hill, Conn. 



Diseases in Dogs Which Are Transmissible to 
Man. 



[BY DR. ("ECir. FRENCH ] 

The question is often asked: "What diseases can 
human beings catch from dogs?". This is a question 
which it does not take long- to answer, for they are 
very few and can practically be counted on the finger s 
of one hand. 

First and most important and most to be dreaded is 
r abies. I am aware that a few persons are skeptical 
of the existence in and transmission of this disease 
from the lower animals to man. In the wilds of Africa 
there are also many persons skeptical of the existence 
of the machine known as the steam engine. It is safe 
to say that neither body of beings has witnessed the 
condition or object in the existence of which they have 
no faith. They simply don't and won't believe, and 
this in spite of tlie teachings of scientific men who are 
familiar with either or both. 

There comes a day when the African is shown the 
gteam engine, whereupon he usually makes himself 
scarce, if the skeptics could only be placed in the 
near presence of a rabid dog, it is safe to say there 
would soon be a scarcity of skepticism. 

Rabies is unfortunately a common disease amongst 
Southern canines. It is spread largely by roving and 
tramp ownerlsss mongrels, not that a mongrel is any 
more susceptible than his brother of higher breeding, 
but because the latter can usually look to an owner 
whose constant watchfulness and control over his 
friend and pet reduces the risk of contagion consider- 
ably. The disease in such an animal is nipped in tho 
bud by destruction of the sufferer before he has an 
opportunity to infect others. It is a mistake to sup- 
pose that rabies is only prevalent during the summer 
months. The records of tho District of Columbia 
health office show that the cooler months of tho year 
and even winter have their share. 

Some persons purchase their pets from the municipal 
pounds, or they may oven harbor stray dogs. This is 
a practice which cannot be too strongly condemned, 
unless the animals in question are kept closely quaran- 
tined for a few weeks. The disease may be in latency, 
undergoing its period of incubation, only to burst forth 
unexpectedly some days hence. 

Next in importance is the so-called Hydatid disease 
of man. This malady does not exist as such in tho 
dog, but it occurs in tho latter animal as the Hydatid 
Tapeworm (Taenia Kchinococcus). This parasite, and 
consequently tho resultant disease in man, is appar- 
ently quite raro in the United States, though isolated 
cases of hydatid disease are known to occur, some of 
which, however, have been founa among immigrating 
foreigners. Out of 100 cases of the disease in man 
reported by tho Bureau of Animal Industry, in the 
year 1895-96, occurring throughout the United States, 
4 came from the District of Columbia, 2 from Virginia, 
10 from Pennsylvania, 38 from New York, none from 
Maryland, and in smaller numbers from other con- 
tiguous States. 

The worm in the dog is very small, aoout one-eighth 
of an inch in length, and attaches itself to the wall of 
the bowel. The eggs of this worm are passed, and 
since they are microscopic in size, can find their way 
into the human stomach by adhering to the foodstuffs, 
such as lettuce and other articles which are not sub- 
jected to cooking. These eggs then undergo partial 
development and may find their way into almost any 
part of the body, lodging most frequently in the liver 
or lungs, and becoming the larval or intermediate 
cystic form of tho adult tap-worm of this variety. 
Fi f ty per cent, of cases in the human subject are fatal. 

This par&dlte also infests other animals in the same 
m;mner, and dogs acquire the mature worm by devour- 
ing the organs of such animals containing the larval 
form. Hence dogs should not be allowed access to 
slaughtering places, nor should they be fed on un- 
cooked meat which has not been subjected to close 
scrutiny. 

I intimated above that Hydatid Disease of man is 
comparatively rare in this country, but in other coun- 
tries where canine flesh is used for food it is a good 
deal more prevalent. In Belgium it has been found 
necessary to provide a regulation prohibiting the 



offering for sale of the stomach and intestines of the 
dog. 

Probably the next most important disease in rela- 
tion to its contagiousness to human beings is tubercu- 
losis or consumption. It used to bo generally thought, 
and still is by some, that this disease could not be 
acquired by the dog, but the truth is that it is by no 
means uncommon among those animals. [In this re- 
spect we note the case of Byron Erkenbrecher's Fox 
Terrier, Warren Clerk, which died in Los Angeles last 
year. The autopsy showed tuberculosis in an ad- 
vanced stage, although this disease was not the actual 
cause of tho dog's death. Tho dog's prior owner, who 
muchly petted him, was tho late H. G. Hummelright, 
who succumbed last year to consumption. — Ed.] 

They no doubt contract it through their association 
with mankind by breathing germ-laden atmosphere, 
as well as by eating and drinking diseased meat and 
milk. Some two years ago I had a case of probable 
contagion from a human being in a little Black and 
Tan Terrier. Its mistress had been sent to Washing- 
ton from Boston, her physician hoping the more 
southern climate would be beneficial to her, she suffer- 
ing from pulmonary tuberculosis. She had not been 
careful about expectorating, and there is no doubt in 
ray mind that her dog acquired the disease from her, 
probably by ingestion of food, which, through his 
habit of carrying the latter from tho plate to the floor, 
had become contaminated with germs lying there. 
Anyhow, the little dog died in a few months of tuber- 
culosis of the liver. There are many other recorded 
instances of dogs acquiring tho disoase from their mas- 
ters, and while at the present moment instances of 
reversed conditions do not occur to my mind, there is 
no doubt whatever that a dog suffering from tubercu- 
losis becomes a menace to human health. 

One other disease to be regarded as at all important 
is Ringworm, Dogs acquire this from children and 
vice versa, consequently any symptoms suggestive of 
this parasitic disease should call for prompt isolation 
of tlie sufferer. 

Anthrax, or, as it is termed when attacking human 
beings, '"Malignant Carbuncle," can be contracted 
by man from dogs, which, in turn, have acquired it 
by eating the tlesh of animals dead of that disease, but 
it is so extremely rare that it need hardly be considered. 

It is often asked if real parasitic mange of the dog is 
catching to human beings. In a measure it is, but in 
the animal kingdom it is found that each species of 
animals has its own particular parasites, which seldom 
are ablo to thrive on the bodies of other species, and 
this is true of tho mange parasite of the dog. When 
placed on the human skin, it will cause some slight de- 
gree of irritation, but speedily ceases to thrive and 
soon dies before propagating its kind. 

Fleas, if one may regard infestation by them as a 
disease, need no remarks. Everyone is supposed to be 
familiar with that little parasite. 

This comprises about tho whole of the diseases which 
we are liable to contract from our friend, certainly not 
a very formidable list. 

A DANGEROUS INTESTINAL WORM. 

Dog owners are all more or less experienced with the 
symptoms produced by the intestinal worms which in- 
fest their charges, and tho wiser amongst them gen- 
erally submit their puppies to a course of treatment 
for the eradication of these parasites before either is 
far advanced in development. 

The varieties of worms commonly known are the 
round and tho tape forms. The so-called mawworm 
is not a separate spocies, but merely an expelled eeg 
ment or chain of segments from a tapeworm. It is 
capable of self-movement, and for this reason has been 
thought by some to be a distinct and separate form. 

It is not generally known, however, that in Mary- 
land, Ohio and Virginia (in naming these three States 
it is because I have found it present there, but it is to 
bo presumed that it occurs also farther South) there 
exists another, and by far the most dangerous, form 
of intestinal worm. No account of this one is to be 
found in any but the technical works on zoology, 
which is a matter of some surprise, since it occurs not 
at all infrequently, is almost ineradicable when it has 
once infested adog, an 3 produces such profound effects 
on the whole organism that the name of "Pernicious 
Anaemia of Dogs" has been given to this disease. 

Hero, then, is to some a probably unknown source 
of danger to the inmates of their kennels, a danger 
that is insidious in its advent. A well known stud 
Skye. Barnaby Rudge, the property of Mrs. E. M. 
Williams, three years ago succumbed to its effects, 
and numerous other instances have come to my notice 
in the past few years. 

The parasite in question is known technically as the 
Uncinaria, or Dochmius. It is about one-quarter of an 
Inch in length and about as thick as a fine needle. 
Attached to its head are several curved teeth sur- 
rounding a sucker-like mouth. By means of this 
arrangement it sucks and bores its head deep into the 
inner lining cf tho wall of tho bowel, where it thrives 
on tho blood of tho animal. From this it will be easily 
understood that in addition toils le ch-like drain on 
the blood of its host it also sets up an intense local 
inflammation which involves the absorptive and diges- 
tive glands. It is by means of these glands lining the 
wall of the bowel that tho nutriment is in part digested 
and taken into the system. If, then, the glands be- 
come inflamed and tumefied, as occurs, they will fail 
to perform their natural function and the animal must 
literary starve. 

And so we find that when an animal becomes in- 
fested with this parasite, and tiough the appetito may 
not become markedly changed, yet there is a continual 
wasting and general anaemic condition produced. 



f January ll, 1902 



Sometimes severe bleeding from the nose takes place. 

From the chronic inflammation produced by the 
burrowing and biting of the worm wo naturally look 
for an abnormal condition of the fa>cal excretions. 
Diarrhoea, often foul-smelling and accompanied with 
more or less hemorrhage, is a constant symptom. In 
the latter stages ulcers and gangrenous sores appear 
on any part of the body. The disease may last from 
three or four months to a year. As to treatment, that 
is a difficult matter. The reason is that the head and 
mouth of tho worm being buried deep into the wall of 
the bowel no drugs we can give are likely to reach the 
vital parts of the parasite, and are consequently in- 
effectual. 

The mode of propagation of the worm is as follows: 
Slight development from the egg stago takes place in 
the oviduct of the female worm, whilst it is in the in- 
testine of the dog. As soon as the embryo passes out 
of the bowel with the excrement and reaches water 
(gutters, pools, etc.,) a larval form develops, provided 
the right temperature exists. The larval form is then 
imbibed by the dog along with the water he drinks 
if he should satisfy his thirst at such places. 

And the moral of all this is, never to allow a dog to 
drink any but the purest water. 



Fractures of the Legs. 

If your dog breaks his leg, there need be no great 
rush to have it attended to, provided he has not sus. 
tained what is known as a compound fracture, i.e. 
where the ends of the broken bones are protruding 
through a wound. In the latter case there is no need 
to chloroform the sufferer, but competent advice from 
a medical expert should at once be sought, as such a 
wound needs careful and regular dressing and special 
setting. 

If it be a simple fracture, it will, shortly afterwards, 
begin to swell at the seat of the break, and this swell- 
ing should be allowed to subside before any attempt at 
placing the leg in a splint is made. If this is done 
sooner, the pressure of the swelling on the surround- 
ing hard, unyielding splint is liable to stop tho flow of 
blood and may cause the leg to die from want of nutri- 
tion and to slough off. Therefore, when your dog 
breaks his leg, wait (maybe 48 hours) until the swell- 
ing subsides, and then haveyour veterinarian or doctor 
put '.he limb in a plaster cast. It will bo less painful 
to tho dog then, and there is no danger of cutting -off 
tho circulation. 

It is remarkable that though it is always best to 
assist- nature by applying a bandage that will hold the 
fractured ends in position to insure a perfect reunion, 
nature endeavors to do precisely tho same thing in the 
tissues concerned. When a bono breaks, tho ends do 
not unite first, but a temporary bandage of bone-salts 
is thrown out all around to enclose the two or more 
broken ends. After this is solid enough to hold the 
parts together, the knitting together of the end com- 
mences, and when this is finally accomplished, nature 
thereupon removes by absorption the temporary band- 
age of bone that was first thrown out round tho 
break. 

Some Popular and Effective Remedies For 
Dog Ailments. 

The name of "Glover" is a familiar one, not only in 
the United States and British Columbia, but also in 
Mexico, Central and South America, the West Indies, 
New Zealand, Australia and tho Orient. The "Im- 
perial" dog remedies manufactured by Dr. Glover have 
in truth a world wide reputation. On the Pacific 
Coast wherever a general store is carried on will be 
found Dr. Glover's remedies. The Doctor is well 
known to many of our sportsmen here, having some 
years ago been a resident among us. Some of the 
progeny of the Gordon Setters bred by him are thought 
highly of to-day by their owners. 

The sign manual of st rling merit of the "Imperial" 
remedies has been shown in a systematic and constantly 
increasing volume of business. With the enlargement 
of business naturally camo the need of an assistant. 
The right man has been found in the selection of Dr. 
French, who has for years past been Dr. Glover's right 
bower. 

Dr. French's views on various matters pertaining to 
the dog in health and disease have been given time 
and again in the kennol pages of the Breeder and 
Sportsman; the personal assurances of many of our 
readers have been an endorsement of the Doctor's pro- 
fessional skill and wisdom which we are here pleased 
to publish. 

The Coast agency of the Imperial Dog Remedies is 
conducted by tho well known firm of Clabrough, Gol- 
cher & Co., 538 Market street. 

If any of our readers have not yet procured a copy 
of Dr. Glover's book on "Dog Diseases and How to 
Feed, " a request for the same mailed to the above 
named firm or to Dr. Glover, 1278 Broadway, N. Y., 
will receive prompt response, free by return mail. 

Dr. Glover's dog modicines and remedies we can per- 
sonally endorse through our own experience and ob- 
servation in very many cases whore they have been 
usod with excellent results. 

The Christmas edition of the English Stock-Keeper is 
before us this week. To describe its many excellencies 
would be indeed a task An interesting feature of the 
illustrated supplement is tho collection of portraits of 
the Kennel Club Council of Representatives. The 
whole edition is full of interesting reading matter and 
embellished with a largo number of excellent half tones 
of high class dogs of many breeds. 

Jackson's Napa Soda is sold in every citv, town and 
hamlet in the State. 



January 11, 1902J 



9 



To the Coyote. 

( C'anis Latrans ) 



3. Mayne Baltimore. 
Shaggy skulker of the field, 
Tawny thief of brush and fell; 
Sharp of nose and keen of scent, 
Restless eye— listening ear. 
Ever on the quick qui vive, , 
Watching for some toothsome prey. 
A lion bold, when danger's far, 
Coward, sneak, when peril's near. 
Gaunt and lean, and ever hungry; 
Always on the quiet prowl, 
Searching slyly for a meal 



DOINGS IN DOGDOM. 



The New Jersey Kennel Association will hold its 
first dog show in Newark, N. J., February 2t>th, 27th 
and 28th and March 1st. 



Peter Wetteran of Grass Valley has two promising- 
Pointer bitch puppies which are just roady for their 
first field <?ork. They are by Young Rip Rap out of 
Jingo's Lass. 

Wallace Moore has a bitch Fox Terrier puppy he 
received this week from E. deB. Lopez, owner of the 
Merriwa Kennels. The young one Is two months old 
and a likely looking puppy. She is by Ch. Aldon 
Swag rer out of Strip (Oriole Bluffer-Creole). 



Woodcote Chinosol, the champion Bulldog of Eng- 
land, died recently. He was by Bapton Monarch out 
of Doctor Janet and was a grand and all over sound 
dog. Mr. W. J. Pegg had received numerous offers 
for him from American fanciers, one offer going as 
high as $5000, but he always refused, believing that the 
dog was good enough to keep. 



Bull Terrier Kennels Sold. 



Champion Woodcote Wonder is now owned by L. A. 
Klein. Mr. O. O. Heydenfeldt, the owner of the 
Gainsborough Kennels, has disposed of a'l of his dogs 
and will probably abandon all active participation in 
aff Irs of the fancy. Along with Wonder went the 
bitch American Belle (formerly Bayview Sabatia) and 
Dot and four Bull Terrier puppies. Woodcote Wonder 
will be in stud at Mr. Klein's kennels, 2570 Geary 
street, which is to-day announced in our kennel adver- 
tisements. 

Mr. Klein purchased all of Gainsborough Kennels 
Bull Terriers. The puppies are good ones, by Bay- 
view Brigadier out of American Belle. 



FISH LINES. 



Striped bass fishing these cold days is somewhat 
dormant. What the fish do and where they go is an 
unsolved problem for the present. Many of the ex- 
perts claim that in warm, pleasant weather the fish 
can still be caught in Raccoon straits and vicinity just 
as plentifully as was the case two months ago. 



Salt water angling in and around San Francisco bay 
is good at present, but only indulged in to any extent 
during pleasant weather, which has not been apparent 
to a great degree for several weeks past. The prevail- 
ing cold north wind has kept most of the fishermen 
away from the fishing resorts. 

Piscatorial affairs in southern waters are laid in more 
congenial lines, as will be noted in the following taken 
from the Los Angeles Express: 

"Late last week a report reached town that the yellow 
fins had been biting well at Ocean Park, but owing 
to the lateness of the season the piscatorial fraternity 
in general doubted the truth of the story. It appears, 
however, that it was under the truth rather than an 
exaggeration. 

Simon Spier and Will Stearns fished at Ocean Park 
yesterday and caught upward of fifty fish between 
them, all being surf, croakers and yellowfins in the 
order named. During the day tno bottom seemed to 
be covered with fish of these varieties, and they began 
biting fi«crely about noon. 

Most of the fishing contingent at Ocean Park were 
rigged for mackerel and smelt, but those who were out 
for surf got them, and they were good ones. 

The run at this time of year is unprecedented, and 
Capt. J. Addison Smith, who probably is better posted 
on fishing matters than any other man in Santa 
Monica, says that he is at a loss to account for the 
present run. Captain Smith furthor says that the 
deep water fish are biting quite as fiercely as the surf, 
and his party, out Saturday in the launch Donahue, 
could have caught a ton of fish instead of a few hun- 
dred pounds had they desired. Whitofish, bass, rock 
cod and all the other marine varieties were abundant 
on the banks, and during the day immense schools of 
mackerel were seen. Captain S§pith tells a graphic 
story of the discovery of the mackerel. Says he: 

"Wo were standing in tho boat attending to out- 
fishing when I heard a sound like >,he rushing of wind 
over the sea, and looked back thinking we might be 
encountering a squall, but it was not the wind that 
caused the noise. An immense school of mackerel 
rushed past the boat and continued in sight for Bome 
time. When they had passed, the cause of their 
hurry was to be seen. A school of bonita was pursu- 
ing the mackerel. The terrified fish ran against our 
boat constantly and many of them must have been 
killed by the shock.,, 

There will be a big delegation of fishermen New 
Year's Day, if the weather be fair. Whether tho 
present run will continue that long is somewhat prob- 
lematical, but many will take the chance." 



Sober up on Jackson's Napa Soda. 



Steelhead Fishing in Russian River. 

What promised to be one of tho best winter angling 
seasons in years for steelhead in the tide waters of 
Russian river for tho past two weeks has resulted but in- 
differently for the many anglers who have recently vis- 
ited the stream hoping to take advantage of apparently 
favorable fishing conditions. The desires of the en- 
thusiastic anglers have not materialized as was antici- 
pated and with a number the pleasant angling pros- 
pect has been disrupted. The causes for this, to be 
regretted, state of affairs are twofold. Firstly, the 
few fish that have been landed, although fresh run 
and seemingly in splendid condition, have come to gaff 
with the pugnacity of a dish rag— one fish weighing 
seventeen and ono-half pounds, caught by C. B. Holly- 
wood on Sunday and the largest steelhead trout taken 
out of the river this soason, the angler said: "Had no 
more life in it than a beefsteak on tho spoon." This 
is to be deplored no doubt, but the worst feature of 
affairs found on tho river and which spoiled and short- 
ened the fishing trip of a number of anglers was the 
illegal practice of using set nets and drawing seines in 
the waters of Sonoma county. In one pool on Satur- 
day over eighty fine fish were netted. This exaspera- 
ting custom of some of tho residents in tho vicinity of 
Duncan's Mills and below has, it is claimed, been in 
vogue since the present, run of fish from the ocean. 
A number of fish hooked recently have shown the 
marks of the gill net. The money spent in that soc- 
tion by the sportsmen is many hundred times more 
than the amounts received by the poachers for mar- 
keting their fish. We remember one season when the 
net scavengers got but four cents a pound for their 
catches 

The depletion of the river by the not men should be 
looked after by both the county authorities and the 
Board of Fish Commissioners. 

Among the anglers on the river Sunday and last 
week were Alex T. Vogelsang, T. W. Brotherton, John 
Gallagher, M. J. Geary, J. A. Pariser, Capt. Green 
Watson, C. B. Gould, John Butler, Al Wilson, John 
P. Babcock, C. B. Hollywood, W. A. Cooper, George 
Matson and others. 

The fish for some reason or other were very indiff- 
erent to the trolling spoons, double hooks baited with 
salmon roe or the red fly and shrimp lure. The angler 
would see many signs of fish about him in the water, 
but try as he would the fish did not to any great ex- 
tent notice the tackle trolling for their particular 
benefit. These conditions, however, were patiently 
observed by many of the expert fishermen, who, know- 
ing the ways of the fish, were prepared to meet a 
change at any time when the big trout would go for the 
shrimp, trolling spoons or the mushy spawn dangling 
on the keen barbed hooks and change the placid order 
of events by showing the appetite and fighting spirit 
that causes the nerves of the true angler to tingle with 
the excitement of keen enjoyment and health giving 
recreation. 

The river is not too low, the water, in fact, is fairly 
up and fish have been seen as far up stream as Hop- 
field. The stream has been as clear as crystal — these 
conditions will prevail until the rains come and raise 
the river to a boiling, roily current that will put the 
quietus for the time being on exploits with rod and 
reel. 

The fish that have been caught were apparently not 
playing favorites with any particular lure, as they 
were hooked with each kind of trolling tackle used. 
Among those who were successful were Matson with a 
catch of three or four a day; Butler, two on Saturday 
and a fourteen pounder on Monday. Gallagher, one 
large fellow; Babcock, eight on Friday and Saturday; 
Wilson, eight on Friday; a sixteen and eight pound 
fish were on exhibition Monday in Skinner & Com- 
pany's show windows. Cooper and Geary also hooked 
two fish each. Pariser had quite a lively experience. 
Whilst ashore he had stuck his rod in the sand and 
Mr. Hollywood in going out on the river again in the 
boat, took his line out and dropped it into the water. 
In a very short while it was evident that there was a 
fish on the line. Other anglers who were within observ- 
ing distance vouch that the quick time made by Pariser 
in getting to his rod was a picturesque sprint never 
equalled in the history of many amusing incidents 
which are recounted as having transpired at Russian 
river. In handling the fish Pariser demonstrated some 
fundamental principles in steelhead fishing that wore 
comparatively new but effective. 



A nice catch of striped bass was taken one day last 
week by Fred H. Bushnell and Al M. Cumming. The 
two anglers trolled San Antonio slough, this trip being 
Bushnoll's initial one after striped bass. Cumming 
landed five fish weighing in the aggrogato nearly 
twenty-five pounds. Bushnell hooked three fish, tho 
largest scaled six and ono half pounds. Bushnell was 
fast to a very large fish for somo time boforo the bass 
broke away. The two fishermen were apparently just 
at tho beginning of making a big catch when they 
were compelled to desist in order to tako tho train 
back to tho city. Tho fish were caught at just about 
low water. 

Experiments conducted for ascertaining tho height 
a salmon will leap in clearing a waterfall have shown 
that tho fish will go to a distance of twenty feet in tho 
air in the effort to pass over the obstruction to its 
passage up stream. It was furthor observed that 
when a fish failed to clear the fall at ono jump, it re- 
mained in the falling water and then with a rapid 
twist of the body would make another spring which 
was generally successful. These experiments were 
rocently undertaken by one of tho directors of tho 
Norwegian fisheries. 



Two striped bass, weighing sixteen and eight pounds 
respectively, were taken out of Flaherty's hole on 
Russian river, near Duncan's, one day last week. 



An Oregon Rabbit Battue. 

In this State cottontails and jack rabbits are so 
plentiful that many sportsmen care but little to shoot 
them. Being infested at certain times of the year 
with both intestinal and tissue parasites the "jacks" 
are particularly objectionable on this account. The 
cottontails which frequent rocky places are generally, 
however, in better edible condition than tho brush 
rabbits. In the vicinity of this city, near San Pedro, 
San Mateo county, for instance, a day's shooting can 
be had on cottontails very often. The hills and valleys 
back of Berkeley, across the bay, have long been good 
rabbit hunting ground. The best jack rabbit district 
for local sportsmen can be found in Sonoma county, 
particularly on the reclaimed marsh lands. Here every 
Sunday many leashmen resort to give their hounds a 
run on jacks. Tho longoars aro also hunted by many 
shooters, men and boys, hailing principally from tho 
Latin quarter. In other portions of the State, notably 
the San Joaquin plains jack rabbits are at times so 
numerous as to become a post. At such times on an 
appointed day there will be a meeting of the people 
from a particular district and a "rabbit drive" will 
tako place for tho purpose of thinning out the rodents. 
In other Pacific Coast Statos tho same conditions often 
prevail and rabbit drives are then in order. 

The methods of conducting a "drive" are practically 
the samo, excopting of course some features, which 
are local only, and more or less intenso according to 
the experience of those participating. Tho description 
of a recent drivo near Pendleton, Oregon, seems to in- 
dicate that the damage done to the farmers and 
ranchers by tho rabbits was so great that tho drivo 
was a huge shambles resulting from a bloodthirsty 
saturnalia and tho people participating for the time 
being forgot to a groat oxtont that they were human 
beings as will appear from the following: 

"Three thousand five hundred jack rabbits were 
killed in an immense slaughter pen in the Butter creek 
couty, thirty-three miles west of Pendleton, Or., on 
Sunday, December 29th. It was the groatest drive in 
the history of this section. Eight hundred men and 
boys participated in the massacre, cheered on by 
many women. 

An immense corral of wire netting had been built on 
the sagebrush prairie, with arms extending a quarter 
of a mile on each side. In the center was a circular 
pen 100 feet in diameter and ten feet high. Two 
special trains brought clubbers from Pendleton and 
Heppner, while from smaller towns the drivers came 
on foot and in wagons. The drivers were lined up and 
in a line two miles long, brandishing clubs, they startod 
toward the corral, tho rabbits being driven from cover 
at every step until the corral was full to overflowing. 

Then began the slaughter. Excited by tho scene 
men grew reckless and struck right and left until 
maimed and dead were piled up on all sides, the 
wounded moaning in misery until some more humane 
person returned to finish the work. Six hundred wero 
taken alive and the balance were piled in five great 
heaps." 

In many sections where rabbit hunting is a distinct 
and highly enjoyed sport in the winter the above will 
no doubt excite much adverse comment. Conditions 
are various in different places; a custom in vogue in 
one place may not be countenanced in another locality. 

Another rabbit story is at hand that, to many, will 
seem almost incredible. We cannot vouch for its 
truth, but will give it as told in a recent press dispatch 
from Tacoma: 

"The sudden multiplication of rabbits along tho Klon- 
dike creeks has caused those small animals to become 
a nuisance. Thousands of thom are being killed off, 
and still they seem to increase. Stewod rabbits and 
rabbit pot pie have becomo as familiar on the Klon- 
dike bills of fare as corned beef hash and baked beans 
are in other mining regions. 

If the Klondike was as short of provisions this year 
as it was four years ago there would be no cause for 
alarm, for the numbor of rabbits available is sufficient 
to supply the demand for frosh moat. The rabbits 
find their chief delight in burrowing into and devour- 
ing tho caches of provisions belonging to miners. To 
abate this evil Klondike dogs havo been taught to 
catch all the rabbits they can eat. Many of them are 
fed on nothing else and still are sleek and healthy." 



Spare the Swans. 

Tho Colusa Herald recounts the story of two city 
huntors who went out shooting recently with C. C. 
Epperson, a Sutter City sportsman, familiarly known 
as- "Uncle Bud." The young men wero somewhat 
boastful and volunteerod to shew tho veteran how to 
shoot. They wore somewhat surprised that they were 
not getting any the besu of him, but were still confi- 
dent, when along camo two boautiful swans. Tho 
city sportsmen became rattled and allowed "Uncle 
Bud" to bag both birds. Thoy wore magnificent spec- 
imens, measuring ovor sovon foet from tip to tip. 

It is pleasing to know that tho vetoran sportsman 
still is with tho gun. It is to bo regrotted, however, 
that tho two swans had to bo sacrificed to show his 
shooting skill. These graceful, harmless birds aro not 
any too plentiful, and as a table bird have a reputation 
for tough noss second to nono. Swans should bo spared, 
there is plenty of other gamo for tho huntor. 



Sacramento sportsmon fared good, bad and indiffer- 
ent last Sunday. The luck of the huntors ranged 
from limit bags to nil. At tho Canvasback Club poor 
shooting conditions ensued, tho members getting small 
bags of ducks only. At the Del Paso and other clubs 
the results were passably good. On tho Yolo side 
many birds were killed, principally mallards. 



10 



©It*? $veebev awl* &povt&xxxaxx 



[January 11, 1902 



An Enterprising Journal. 

We will here remind the publisher of a weekly ad- 
vertising paper whioh is known to fame and also a 
limited number of subscribers, under the title of Pas- 
time that the article entitled "English Snipe" and 
signed "O. E.," which was printed in its columns last 
week had been prepared by the editor of this depart- 
ment for Tlie Bulletin and was published in the sport- 
ing news columns of that evening journal several weeks 
ago. 

As the weekly above referred to is heralded as the 
champion of the apostles of game protection (and all 
that implies, so far as anything can be made out|of it) 
and has also been offered for purchase to a syndicate 
of wealthy gentlemen, who are identified with field 
trials and other sports, at a bed rock price of $5000 
cash and a conditional provision that $5000 more be 
put up as a sinking fund (permanent investment 
rather) to carry on the good work, we would suggest 
that the custom of appropriating reading matter abso- 
lutely, or of publishing articles and gingerly giving 
credit for them in a manner that would lead a reader 
to believe the matter was originally contributed, as 
has been the practice, is in as much bad taste, to put 
it mildly, as the practice of running the same bor- 
rowed cuts and half tones over and over again at 
regular intervals. 

Sportsmen who are willing to invest $5000 for the 
g->od of the cause, would be hard to convince that an 
equivalent for that amount of money could be found 
in a weekly paper devoted to a rehash of current 
events (thoroughly thrashed out during the week by 
the daily papers) and seasoned with complimentary 
trade notices. 

Hunting Notes. 

Local sportsman, have, for the last week, enjoyed 
one of the best duck shooting periods noted for many 
years past. The absence of rain and the prevailing 
north winds have dried up many interior feeding 
grounds, the ducks in consequence have taken to the 
feeding grounds of the tulo districts in the Sacramento 
and San Joaquin valleys and also the many baited and 
fresh water ponds to be found in the bay shore marshes. 

Last Sunday, for instance, teal ducks were to be 
seen by the thousands on the Suisun marshes and as a 
consequence many hunters procured limit bags. Two 
of the prettiest strings of birds we have seen this sea- 
son were brought down Sunday night by James May- 
nard, Jr., and Dr. E. N. Ayers from the Canvasbark 
Gun Club preserve. Of the 100 teal ducks on the 
straps 75 of them were drakes. The whole bunch 
were fat and in splendid condition. The morning was 
rather pleasant with but little wind blowing and the 
birds pitched into the ponds in a continuous lino of 
whir ring ducks. They were so plentiful that the two 
hunters took their time and deliberately picked out 
their birds singly and without recourse to "lap" or 
flock shots. 

Hunter.-' at Sears Point and near MeGills had a splen- 
did day's duck shooting also. At the Point oilskins 
were taken out to the blinds in the morning, the 
weather looking as if rain would drop. Bay shore 
shootinir was out of the question by reason of a heavy 
sea on the shallow shores. 

The combined bag for eleven shooters at the Field 
and Tula Club amounted to -59 birds. F. H. Bushnell 
and A. M. Gumming b igired a number of sprig and 
toal at the club pond e on Wednesday. 

Similar conditions prevailed at the Stewart ponds 
near Denvert.on, where Otto Feudner, with Ben L. 
Owen and G. R. Field were shooting. Tho shores of 
the ponds were literally packed with the birds. In 
adjacent ponds and shallow water they were so thick 
that tho feeding horses and cattle would almost walk 
over them before they would set out of the way. 
Chicken hawks hovering about on the edge of the 
high grasses and tules were paid strict attention to by 
the teal, which frequently during the morning- would 
take refuge from the prowling birds of the air in the 
depths of tho dense vegetation surrounding the water. 
At this spot the morniug was cold and frosty, the kind 
of a morning when birds bunch together, a time at 
which the market hunter delights to bring his 4 bore 
into play. The combined bag of the party was mado 
up mostly of teal, with a sprinkling of spooney s, mal- 
lards and canvasback. Feudner shot the limit on 
English snipe in the forenoon, the day being almost an 
ideal one for snipe shooting. 

Bay shore shooting from blinds near Sobrante, San 
Pablo, Steiger and along the west side has been excel- 
lent. Canvasback and blue bill ducks are in that 
portion of San Pablo bay in immense numbers. 

On the Alameda marshes from San Leandro dow'n 
to Alviso most hunters had fair shooting. Near 
Mount Eden most of the birds shot were spoonbills. 

Duck shooting in the marsh near Point Reyes has 
been of sufficient importance to attract a number of 
hunters for several Sundays past. 



Quail shooting conditions have been different in 
various locations. Last Sunday in some sections tho 
birds would work splendidly, in others again, tho birds 
when flushed would whirr quickly to heavy cover and 
then do some running that would be creditable in a 
quarter horse but is exasperating to the sportsman 
and is a scource oi irritation to his dog. 

The Sncad and Millar dairy tule district about twelve 
miles southeast of Dixon is at present fairly infested 
with countless numbers of mallard. The Dixon Gun 
Club members who shoot on the Blithe tract in the 
Yolo basin have had choice shooting ever since the 
season opened. 



California favorite hot weather drink— Jackson's 
Napa Soda. 



Fly-Casters' Banquet to John P. Babcock. 

The San Francisco Fly-Casting Club members and 
guests on Thursday evening convened around the 
banquet table, the occasion being a complimentary 
dinner tondored to John P. Babcock, a genial sports- 
man and esteemed member of tho club who has been 
on a brief visit to this city and who is now located at 
Victoria, British Columbia, and holds the responsi- 
ble position of Commissioner of Fisheries for British 
Columbia. Mr. Babcock, three months ago, tendered 
his resignation as Chief Deputy Fish Commissioner of 
the State Board of Fish Commissioners to accept an 
offer from the British Columbia authorities which has 
opened to him a field of laoor and research that will 
eventually lead to the achievement of his laudable 
ambition to be known as the salmon authority of tho 
Pacific Coast. 

President Walter D. Mansfield presided as toast- 
master and the company was entertained by speeches 
from John P. Babcock, who briefly outlined the im- 
mense importance of tho salmon fisheries of the 
northern province and sketched a plan for the estab- 
lishment of a fish hatchery at a desirable location 
on the headwaters of the Fraser river. Aside 
from the practical views outlined by the speaker 
he voiced a fraternal and sportsmanlike sentiment 
in picturing, iD a felicitous manner, tho congenial had- 
piness and satisfaction the appearance of his fellow 
anglers and friends, from time to time at his hospitable 
board, located at the outlet to Lake Seton and within 
the shadows of stupendous picturesque cliffs, would 
afford him. 

Ex-Commissioner Alex. T. Vogelsang, John A. Hos- 
mer, Joseph Kirk, Judge John Hunt, Jr., P. J. Tor- 
moy, and others addressed the assembly. Mr. Toriney, 
a now membor, suggested a plan whereby tho forma- 
tion of a national league of fly-casters might be brought 
about 

A letter of inquiry from a Chicago fly-caster was tho 
subject of a discussiou that culminatod in the adoption 
of a resolution to hold a tournament at Stow lake in 
August. This competition will bo open to the world 
and will possibly have representative rod wielders hero 
from Chicago, Grand Rapids, New York, Milwaukee 
and other points. The President announced that by 
the time mentioned a fund of $1000 would be available 
to make the tournament a successful one. 

The absence of Secretary Horace Smyth, by reason 
of illnsss. was touchingly commented on by Mr. Vogel- 
sang, and a resolution was passed viva V0C6, tendering 
condolence and regret to the afflicted secretary and 
evincing the sincere wishes of his friends for his early 
recovery. 

Songs and recitations wore rendered by Lloyd Spen- 
cer, W. W. Brackett and Elton Lambert. 

Among those present were: Dr. W. D. Mansfield, 
John P. Babcock, W. E. Brooks, H. Battu, T. W. 
Brotherton, W. F. Bogart, John Henn, A. S. Carman, 

A. L. Coombs, Joseph Blewett, F. E. Daveikosen, A. 

B. Finch, Judge John Hunt, R. Isenbruck, J. C. 
Kiorulff, Georgo H. T. Jackson, W. J. Kierulff, John 
A. tiosmer, Charles F. Kewell, Joseph Kirk, H. F. 
Muller, F. P. McLennan, A. Muller, J. Peltier, W. W. 
Richards, F. H. Reed, S. Rosenheim, John F. Siebe, 
F. G. Sanborn, S. B. Folger, C. F. Stone, Alfred Sutro, 
H. E. Skinner, J. S. Turner, P. J. Tormey, Alexander 
T Vogelsang, C. M. Walker, Charles S. Wheeler, C. 
(i. Young, W. H. McNaughton, R. A. Smyth, J. X. 
De Witt, Lloyd Spencer, Elton Lambert and W. W. 
Brackett. 



Beer Hunting in the East. 



Hunters of big game will soon turn their attention 
to Newfoundland. Eastern sportsman who make 
shooting trips to Canada find caribou and other large 
game becoming scarcer every year. In Newfoundland 
caribou, in particular, are very plentiful A report 
last year from St. Johns stated that the local markets 
were then blocked with venison, tho meat being quoted 
as low as three cents a pound. There it is prohibited 
to kill deer between February 1st and July 15th or 
from Octobor 0th until October 20th in each year. 
Hunting parties are organized by the fishermen and 
poorer class of settlers, who secure not only enough 
venison for their own consumption, but also send large 
quantities to St. Johns for sale. Notwithstanding the 
immense numbers slaughtered each year there has not 
yet been appare t any perceptiblo dimunition of the 
herds. Of course, such wholesale slaughter must soon 
have the effect of exterminating the species. Sports- 
mon are allowed to kill and take three stags and two 
does, and as this latter class only hunt during tho late 
summer and autumn months, and hunt then for 
"heads," they do not affect tho herds very much. 
These deer are all Killed near the water line, so that 
the immense deer parks in the interior of the island 
fortunately remains untrodden. Last year the steamer 
Virginia Lake went up to White Bay after vonison, and 
600 carcases were brought on board. Nover before have 
so many caribou been seen or heard of in that direc- 
tion; by day they can be descried browsing like cattle 
on the hills, whilo one can go a milo in from the sea, 
and cros9 herds of hundreds. The winter had been 
very severe in the interior, and these are driven to 
the coast in quest of food. From Connaigre Bay to 
Fortuno Bay herds of thousands have been seen, and 
only about eight or ten miles inside Burgeo whatever 
number are required can be killed with ease. In the 
bottom of the bays they have come to the very winter 
tilt doors, and one man is reported to have shot a 
large stag whilo it was looking in his door. Under 
such circumstances the people are not short of fresh 
meat and the 000 carcases brought in made vonison a 
cheap article for the next fortnight." 



Pacific Coast Field Trials. 



A big delegation of sportsmen loft today for Santa 
Maria to attend the trials commencing on Monday. 
Judge Balmer arrived yesterday from Soattle and was 
taken in charge by T- J. A. Tiedoman and Albert 
Betz. The attendance at the trials promises to be a 
large one — many sportsmen from Los Angeles and 
other southern points will be present. The Brkkder 
and Sportsman will bo represented at the trials by 
Mr. Albert Betz. 



Bucks Tarred and Tethered. 

The slush and crude oil refuse washed overboard in 
cleansing an oil vessel at one of tho docks in the Oak- 
land estuary was the means of bringing death and 
destruction to thousands of wild ducks a few days 
since. The tarry and oily stuff floated on the surface 
of the water with the tide and when distributed about 
the bay, off theshoresof Bay Farm island particularly, 
was tho cause of the doath and capture of an immense 
nuubor of ducks by hunters and others who soon dis- 
covered tho plight of the poor birds. The ducks by 
coming in contact with the floating material were soon 
as helpless as though swimming into bird lime. 

Many pot hunters and boys who usually get but a 
small number of ducks returned to tho city with big 
bunches of tarry ducks, so soiled and sticky that the 
variety could hardly be determined. Disabled ducks 
were in evidence for several days in tho vicinity of San 
Lorenzo and San Leandro. A number of live ducks 
were captured and brought to town. 

Ducks smeared with the sticky substance were shot 
on Sunday on tho Suisun ponds and at various other 
duck shooting resorts. 

cartribgT "anb shell. 



Geese are plentiful now on tho Solano plains. Hunt- 
ing in the vicinity of Maine Prairie is reported to bo 
first class. 



Recent reports from Los Angeles chronicle fair duck 
shooting for tho southern sportsmen. The best sport 
is found, however, on tho preserves of the Centinella, 
Alainitos, Alia and Cerritos clubs. Mallard, sprigtail, 
teal and a few cans are the principal birds secured. 
Blue bills are now due down south and beginning to 
come in. 

English snipe shooting conditions aro given by a Los 
Angeles correspondent in tho following stylo: Snipe 
shooting below Artesia in some of the flat, muddy 
ground, is said to be good at present. Usually snipe 
will bo found in that vicinity by those who care to go 
that far after them, they are not molested much by 
local shooters who usually are able to get the limit on 
their club preserve when they care to take the tramp. 

Quail are still somewhat of an inducement for a 
journey after them, limit bags however, are becoming 
infrequent. If the coming season is a dry one, as now 
looks likely, the birds may not breed this spring and 
summer. 



A singular feature about the personal appearance of 
nine out of every ten crack shots is one that is very 
seldom noticed, and seems never to have been put into 
print. It is a fact, however, that nine out of every 
ten of the best shots in the country are either blue- 
eyed or have eyes of a grayish tint Light-colored 
eyes seem to be a sine qua non if a man hopes to be a 
good shot, for men with brown or dark-colored eyes 
are seldom good shots, and still more seldom regular 
and consistent performers at tho traps. Perhaps some 
specialist in the study of eyes may be able to give some 
explanation of this peculiarity, for peculiarity it seems 
to be. Why should a blue-eyed man be a better shot 
than a man with brown eyes? Or perhaps, to put the 
question a little better: Why should there bo so many 
good shots with light-colored eyes, and so fow with 
dark-colored eyes? In talking over this point one day 
last year at a tournament, an examination was made 
of the eyes of all the best shots on tho ground; the 
result was 19 to 1 in favor of light eyes, the majority 
of tho light-colored eyes being strongly tinged with 
bright blue. 

AT THE TRAPS. 



The Anaconda Gun Club held a trap shoot on 
December 30th. The scores mado were as follows: R. 
Emmons'21, 22, 19; Cairns 12, 4, 18, 12; L. G. Smith 
14, 17, Hi; B. D. Mahan 16, 15; Nell 19, 17, 15, 17; R. de 
B. Smith 8, 7, 8; Quane 16; McGivern 12; Stracban 
12, 17; Turnor 17; Twohy 16, 14; McKenzie 15, 17. 



Santa Ana shooters are planning a trap shoot to 
take place the latter part of this month or early in 
February at the Orange County Fair. J. E. Vaughan 
and several other sportsmen have the matter in charge 
and will endeavor to offer inducements that will bring 
together at Santa Aijp crack trap shots from all over 
the State. 



At the blue rock shoot for turkeys held on the Lin- 
coln Gun Club grounds four events were on the card, 
the first at 10 targets was won by T. Sheard of Ta- 
oorna, with 10 straight breaks, the other scores were, 
Nauman 9, Price 9, Parker 9, "Slade" 8, Forster 8, 
Hoyt 5, Mrs. Sheard 5. Mr. Sheard on straight score 
at 15 birds in the second race won another turkey. 
In the third event W. Price captured the tuikey in a 
25 target handicap race. The other scores were: 
Nauman (scratch) 22, Sheard (scratch) 21, Forster 
(scratch! 18; Dr. Derby 18 out of 28, Mrs. Sheard 17 
out of 30 Tho last raco, a distauce handicap at 15 
targets was won by Sheard who shot from tho 18-yard 
mark and broke 14, the othor scores made were the 
following: Forster 18 yards, 13 breaks, Nauman 18-12, 
Hovt 16-12, Dr. Derby 16-9, Price 16-9, Mrs. Sheard 
14-9. 



January 11, 1902] 



11 



SS THE FARM, m 



Marketing Wool. 



F. P. Bennett of Boston, was one of the 
speakers at the fifth annual convention of 
the National Live Stock Association, at 
Chicago recently. His subject was "The 
Proper Methods of Marketing Wool." A 
portion of his remarks was as follows: 

"In a word the wool growe s should sel 
their own wool through an agency estab 
lished by themselves. Almost as I was 
writing these words a large Oregon grower 
told me his experience in marketing 360,- 
000 pounds of wool in Boston. He had 
been offered cents per pound for his 
wool at The Dalles, but decided to have it 
graded out and baled on his own account 
at a cost of 25 cents per bale. The freight 
on baled wool from The Dalles is buc \%. 
cents, while from Pendleton it is 2.21 cents. 
The Oregon sheepman brought his family 
to Boston on a visit, and had the wool 
shipped there at the same time. He 
arranged for storage in a public ware- 
house in Boston at the low rate of 3 cents 
per bale for the first month, and showed 
samples of the wool to manufacturers, 
who promptly bought it of him for 13 
cents per pound, while most of the holders 
of similiar wool in Boston were holding 
for 14 cents. The total cost of freight, 
baling, storing and insurance on this wool 
was $1.83 per 1000 pounds. Consequently 
the owners netted over 1 1 cents at home 
for the wool for which they had been of- 
fered 9 1 2 cents, and the manufacturers in 
Boston bought for 13 cents what would 
otherwise have cost them 14 cents. Both 
parties made money, because the entire 
cost of moving the wool from the grower 
to the manufacturer was less than 2 cents 
per pound instead of 6 cents per pound 
under the speculative method of 1899 
above explained. What was accomplished 
by this Oregon shipper can be achieved 
in some measure by growers throughout 
the United States, if they will organize 
and establish their own selling agencies 
in Boston and elsewhere. 



Good Dairy Cows Are Valuable. 

Never in our life have w T e met a farmer 
who was the owner of a good cow but that 
the owner was loud in praise of the ani- 
mal and proud that he was her owner, 
says Dairy Age. The farmer who owns a 
good cow knows that the cow is a money 
maker and knows that a herd of cows as 
good would be a profitable undertaking 
on any farm. But farmers are slow to 
catch on to the fact that a good herd can 
be reared in a few years if the work is se 1 
about in a proper manner. What a most 
delighted set of farmers the West would 
have if each one would some morning 
wake up and find in his lot a herd of cows 
as good milkers as the best one he now 
owns ! A herd of good milkers is worthy 
of any man's admiration. The farmer 
who has perseverance and intelligence 
enough to get together a good dairy herd 
has reason to be proud of his achieve- 
ments. 

A Modern Poultry Farm. 



Our remarks concerning the growth of 
the chicken business, a few weeks ago, 
called attention to the success attained in 
this line by Mr. R. E. Bryant and which 
success can be duplicated by any one who 
will devote the same energy and attention 
to the business.- Mr. Bryant is located 
upon a five acre tract southwest of town. 
One acre of this is planted to alfalfa which 
is cut and fed to the poultry. A flock 
of eleven hundred hens is maintained, 
divided into six different pens. The 
houses are large and roomy, the sides 
hung on hinges. Each morning these 
sides are raised full height so that the sun 
and wind can thoroughly ventilate, fumi- 



gate and dry the houses. At night the 
sides are closed down, furnishing warm h 
to the feathered inhabitants. By this 
method of ventilation the floors arealways 
dry, and the roosts free from vermin. 
City water is piped to each pen, Mr. 
Bryant having found that pure water is 
one of the prime requisites of success in 
the poultry business. The hens are sup- 
plied with an abundance of gravel and 
shells. The laborof caring for the poultry, 
shipping eggs, etc. takes about one-half 
of the owner's time. In conjunction with 
a nei hbor, Mr. Bryant has patented an 
egg-food that has proven highly successful. 
All the buildings on the place are white- 
washed thoroughly several times a year, 
llustrating the pr>fits of the business, 
we have bsfore us the returns for the 
month of December, 1901. From the first 
to the 27th, the cash receipts were exactly 
$208 95, after paying freight and commis- 
sion. The expenses were water $2.50, 
feed $50. leaving the owner $156.35 for his 
labor for the month. The average* ex- 
pense for feed the year around is slightly 
under $50 per month. What other small 
business in the county can beat this. — 
San Benito Advance. 



G. A. Anderson this year raised from 
122 acres of land near the Spreckels' factory 
24S2 tons of sugar beets, an average of a 
fraction over 20 tons to the acre. Deduct- 
ing one-fourth, which went o the Spreck- 
els Company for rent of the land, Mr. 
Anderson had 1861j^ tons of beets left for 
himself, which, at $4 50 per ton, brought 
him $8374. After paying all expenses Mr. 
Anderson easily cleared $6001 for his sea- 
son's work. — Salinas Index. 

Andy Brooks broke the plowing record 
of this county at Fairview last week. With 
two new Deal gang plows, on each of 
which were hitched seven horses, he 
turned over eighty acres of land, an aver- 
age of ten acres a day to the plow. Each 
of the gangs had four ten-inch plow shares. 
—Hollister Free Lance. 

Jackson's Napa Soda untangles the feet 



Percheroa Stallions 

FOR SALE. 

Nativp Qnn toaled April 88, 1897. He is a 
auvc own, ],;i Iu i some black with in-own 
points and was sired by Raglan, 1st dam by 
Adolph, 2d dam by imp. Weinort, 3d dam by imp 
French Spy. Native Son is one of the most prom- 
ising young draft stallions in California, and is 
a sure foal getter. He was bred to 23 mares last 
year and 81 of them are in foal. His six year 
old brother weighs 2000 pounds, and Native Son 
will bo as large at the same age. 

Chief of Kneiphusen. 

lion, bred by Joseph Hlondin of Livermore, Ala- 
meda Co , was sired by Raglan. First dam by 
Starlight, 2d dam by Adolph. 3d dam by French 
Spy. Raglan No 14,739 was imported from France 
by Theo. Skillman Raglan was bred by Joseph 
IJavignon of (Jraucterie Department of Orue. 
Three of Raglan's colts were shown iu Livermore 
on the 24th of Fobruary, 19(1) and their average 
weight wa-i I8.V5 pounds. Chief Kneiphusen was 
foaled March ft, 1S97, and took the first prize in the 
San Francisco and San Mateo Horse Show in 
Tanforan Park. He has been bred to 52 marcs and 
got 48 in foal. His colls can be seen at Livermore 
and at Redwood City When he is full grown he 
will weigh over 8100 pounds. 
For further particulars apply to or address 
II. B GOECKEN, 
Hay, Grain and Feed Merchant, 
585-595 Fourth St., San Francisco. 



15 Cents 



FOR SALE. 

pENT'S DRIVING MARE, AGE «: COLOR 
' Jr Brown: height 16 hands; weight 1150; stand- 
ard bred; no mark: sired by Nushagak 25,939 at 
McLaughlin Ranch, Los Banos; trotting gait; 
thoroughly broke, kind and gentle; can trot very 
fast. Apply to 

NEVADA s i \ in. i s, 
1300 Market St., 8. F. 



FOR SALE. 

Full Brother to Listerine 2:13 1=2. 

Handsome bay three-year-old stallion, ideal con- 
formation for stock horse, inbred to Onward, who 
leads all stallions as a sire of 8:30,2:80 and 2:10 
performances. Just the blood needed to cross on 
Pacific Coast bred mares Sired by Athadon 2:87, 
world's yearling record at time (sire of Sue 2:12%. 
Listerine 2:13'4, Dakon D., 2: IB at three years), 
grandson of Onward, out of the great broodmare 
Athalie, dam of Athanio 2:09%, and four others in 
2:3(1 list. 

Young stallion's dam is Lustrine (dam of Lister- 
ine 2:13tf, Donnatrine, 2:26 three years, by Onward: 
second dam by Challenger, son of Almont; third 
dam by C. M. Clay Jr.. fourth dam by Alexander's 
Abdallah, fifth dam by Hen's Cu;ur de Leon. 
Tabulate this pedigree, and where can you beat 
it? Will pay for himself first year in stud. Address 
GEO. L. WARLOW, Fresno, Cal. 

FOR SALE. 

A HANDSOME SIX-YEAR-OLD BAY MARE 
by Waldstein. Very gentle and perfectly 
sound Standard and registered. An excellent 
road horse or a high class broodmare. For par- 
ticulars address or a-pply to 

g. w. Mcdonald, 

3118 Magnolia Avenue, Oak Park, Cal. 



Animal Clearance sale 



•OF- 



Ladies' Suits, 

Cloaks, Jackets, 

Capes and Waists 

At Tremendous Reductions. 

J. O'BRIEN & GO. 

1144 Market Street. 



BOUGHT, SOLD AND EXCHANGED. 

(~vN HAND NOW AT PARKER'S RANCH, 
s-' Lockeford, San Joaquin County. 400 head of 
extra good Mules, from 3 to 8 years old, broken and 
unbroken, weighing from 900 to 1300 pounds. Ad- 
dress A. F. ROOKER.327 Sixth St., San Francisco. 

Coast Agents 

McMURRAY'S 
Sulkies, Carts and Speed Wagons 

WHEELS TO ORDER 

FOR SULKIES AND CARTS 
at SI 8, $21 and 825 per pair. 

Phone KENNEY BICYCLE CO., 

White 81 531 Valencia St., San Franclgeo 



FIELD, 

HOG 

FENCE 



WIRE 



GOODS 

NETTING 

FENCING 



West Coast Wire and Iron Works 

17-19 Fremont St., San Francisco, Cal. 



GRAND DISPOSAL SALE OF STANDARD 

Trottin^Brood Mares 

SSg&&3D PALO" ALTO STOCK FARH 

On THURSDAY, January 30, 1902, at 11 a. m. 

FOLLOWING IS THE LIST TO BE SOLD AT THIS AUCTION: 



Send 15 cents in 2-eent postage stamps 
and secure a copy of our large 

Blue Ribbon Holiday Edition 

to be published Jan. 15, 1902. Thirty- 
six pages beautifully illustrated and 
replete with information. 
81.00 will secure the large Blue Ribbon 
Holiday Edition and the weekly Spirit 
of the West one year. Address 
Spirit of the West, Des Holnes, Iowa 



| 132,000 Deaths from ] 
this alone. 

i One special danger menaces those who J, 

f live well, who can use champagne and fine j 

f liquors, and that is Bright's Disease. T 

\ Posted clubmen understand this so well I 

£ that many have tests made every few y 

f months Others drink nothing but dry t 

> wines. But still the deaths reported from ij 

r Bright's Disease and Diabetes 3re increas- % 

f ing at a fearful rate The last census re- i 

I ports show that since 1891) the increase has J 

f been nearly fifty per cent and that tho J 

f deaths in tho United States alone from "% 

^ above causes and diseases growing out of g 

them last year reached the enormous num- ffl 

ber of 132.000. J 

Hence the importance of every clubman "ft 

knowing thisono fact, viz.: That Bright's jj 

Disease and Diabetes are now positively "J 

curable in about 87% of all cases. Tho % 

Fulton Compounds aro now saving tho J 

lives of hundreds, and will, when better j? 

known, save tho lives of thousands who "jj 
are now with little hope. 
Send for full descriptivo pamphlets to 

John J. Fulton Co. 

420 Montgomery St., 
■jP SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Foaled 



NAME. 



1885 

I8SI6 

1890. 

1898. 

1887. 

IKIIfi 

1897 

1892. 

1884. 

1882. 

1895 

1884. 

1880 

188ti. 

1883. 

1887. 

1 888 

1881. 

1880. 

1898. . 

1892. . 

1885 . 

1894. . 

1887. . 

1897. . 



'Anselma 2:2914- ■ • 

'Asombrosa 

iBell Bird 2:22.... 

Cecino 

Clarion 2:25% . . . 

'Clarionette 

Coralia 

Corsica 

iElla 2:29 

|Elsie 

Giacinta 

Lady Agnes 

Lady Nutwo'd 2:3414 
Lady well 2:1614... 

Laura Drew 

Lena 

Lilly Thorn 

Morning Glory 

Nellie Benton 2:30 

Ororose 

Sabling 

Sonoma 2:28 

Sylla Uarnes 

Wildmay2:30 

Zoiilla 



SIRE. 



Ansel 2:20 

Azmoor 2:20% 

Electioneer 

Mendocino 2:1914. . 

Ausel 2:20 

Dexter Prince 

Boodle 2-1214 

Dexter Prince 

Electioneer 

General Benton . 
Guy Wilkes 2:15*. 

Electioneer 

Nutwood 2:18%. . . , 

Electioneer 

Arthurton 

Dexter Prince 

Electioneer 

Electioneer 

General Benton. . . 
Ora Wilkes 2:11 ... 
Guy Wilkes 2:15* 

Electioneer 

Whips 2:2714 

Electioneer 

Dexter Prince 



DAM. 



Elaine 2:20 

Ahwaga 

Beautiful Bells 2:2914 

Cecil 

Consolation 

Clarion 2:25^ 

Coral 2:1814 

by Corsican 

Lady Ellen 2:2914 

Elaine 2:20 

Sproule 

Lady Lowell 

Lady Mae 

Lady Lowell 

Molly Drew 2:27 

Lena R 

Lady Thorn Jr 

Marti 

Norma 

Melrose 

Sable; 

Sontag Mohawk 

/iarnes 

May 

Lilly Thorn. 



Stallion Bred to in 1901 



Monbells 2:23'4 

Mendocino 2:\9y t 

Iran Alto 2:12* 

Exi oncer 

Mendocino 2:1914 

Mendocino 2:1914 

Monbells 2:2314 

Exioneer 

Nutwood Wilkes 2:1614 

MoKinney 2:11* 

Azmoor 2:2014 

Exioneer 

Mendocino 2:I9>4 

Monbells 2:23'; 

Mendocino 2:1914 

Mendocino 2:19Vi 

Exioneer 

Exioneer 

Monbells 2:23* 

Mendooino 2:1914 

. Iran Alto 2:12* 

Exioneer 

Monbells 2:23' ; 

Nazote 2:2814 

Exioneer 



& Sex Foaled 



NAME. 



SIRE. 



1882. 
1 8118 
1899 



. 'Azmoor 2:2014 
. I Altower 



Electioneer 

Altivo 2:I8!4 

Mendocino 2:1914 



DAM. 



Mamie C 

.Wildflower (2) 2:21 
Lizzie 



Sale takes place at OCCIDENTAL HORSE EXCHANGE 

721 HOWARD ST., NEAR THIRD, SAN FRANCISCO. 

These mares can be seen at the farm until .January 27th, when thev will be at theKxchange 
Send at once for catalogue to 

WM. G. LAYNG, Live Stock Auctioneer. 



ABSOLUTE] DISPERSAL SALE 

Head of Stallions, Mares, Colts and Fillies, 

THOROUGH BRED AND TROTTING BRED, 

FROM THE 

SONOMA STOCK FARM, 

(ESTATE OF J. II. CHASE) 

TUESDAY, Febrmry 4, 1902, at 10 a. m. 

AT STOCK YARDS. 1732 MARKET ST., SAN FRANCISCO. 

All tho groat thoroughbred Brood Mares, including Marigold, Centella and other 
producers. Also, the stallion Dare by imp. Darobin out of Carrie C. by Monday. 
Twelve two-year-olds, eleven yearlings, bred in the purple, by producing sires and 
from producing dams. See this spaco for further particulars. 

W. H. HORD, Live Stock Auctioneer, 

1732 Market Street, San Franclaco 



12 



[January 11, 1902 



Great Egg Yield From Cow Peas. 

During the past week, says Southern 
Planter, a subscriber called on us and in 
the course of conversation said: "I had 
a wonderful egg yield from my liens last 
winter, and I want to tell the farmers how 
I secured it. I had an acre or two of cow 
peas sowed near the building. In conse- 
quence of scarceness of litbor, I was un- 
able to get all the peas gathered — in fact, 
a large part of them remained. I decided 
to let vines and peas die down on the land 
and lie there all winter. The hens soon 
found the peas and they literally lived on 
the patch until spring, and gave us eggs 
in quantity all the time." This report as 
to the value of cow peas as a winter feed 
is confirmed by a report from a gentleman 
in Maryland who followed the same plan. 
His hens harvested the reas from a plot 



of land last winter, with the result that 
he had eggs when none of his neighbors 
had any. We have before advised the 
feeding o r cow peas to hens, as their rich- 
ess in protein indicates that thev should 
make eggs. If you have no cow pea?, and 
even if you have the peas, we would advise 
the feeding with them of wheat, oats, 
buckwheat and coin mixed for one feed 
per clay, with a hot masli in the morning 
during the cold w eather. The cow peas 
may largely take the place of cut bone if 
you have them. Cut bone and meat 
scraps should, however, be fed twice a 
week. With such a feeding, good, dry, 
warm houses and young, healthy flocks, 
eggs should be plentiful all the winter — 
that is, assuming that you are keeping a 
good laying variety, such as Leghorns, 
Plymouth Rocks or Wyandottes. We 
have found that cross bred hens— the 
product, for instance, of a pure bred Leg- 
horn rooster on l'lyniouth Kock hens — 
are better layers than the pure breed 




\wnrded liold Medal 
At « alitor., la Mule 
Knlr 1*92. 

Kvery imni" owner 
who values his Rt ck 
tiMmM ron-tHi.ily have 
a .supply of it on and. 
It ImprnTefl and keeps 
-I'.rk id the pink of con- 
dition. 

Manhattan Food Go 



RED BALL BRAND. 

It Positively Hums Colic, Scouring and Indigestion 



1253 Folflmu St.. San FranciMc 

ASk your grocein or dea.eis fur it 



A CURBS, SPLINTS, SPAVINS, VVINDPUFFS, * 

— and all enlargements, absolutely removed by — 

QUINN'S 

Ointment. 

It has the unqualified cnrlorsrmcnt of our lead- 
ing horsemen and veterinarian!. 

MB. C. E. DlNEHART, Ca'hier State Bank, 
Slayttfn, Minn., says: 
"One bottle cured a very had case of blnod spavin 
on a mare for which I have since heen offered $800. 
I would not be without it if it cost $r,.(Ki a bottle." 

We have ft. tdreds of such testimonials. ' 

Price Sl.OO per package. Ask your nruegist for it. If 




not keep it, we wiJIhend prepaid no receipt of price, 
dres, W. II. K»I>Y A CO.. Whitehall, N. V. 



Pedigrees Tabulated 

Sportsman, 36 Geary Bhreet, San Francisco, Cal. 



and type written ready for framing 
Write for prices. Breeder and 



Meet Your Friends 
at the Palace Hotel 

Tourists and Travelers who 
make the Palace their headquar- 
ters are surrounded with conve- 
niences and comforts such as are 
not obtainable in any other hotel 
in the West. Off the court are 
the fjrill rooms, telegraph and 
telephone offices, writing rooms, 
barber shop, billiard parlor, car- 
riage office, book stand and type- 
writer offices. 

On one side of this immense 
hotel — the largest in the world — 
is the wholesale and manufactur- 
ing district; on the other thea- 
tres, retail stores, clubs, railroad 
offices, banks and newspaper 
buildings. 

Street cars to all parts of the 
city — depots, ferries, Cliff House 
and parks — pass tho entrance. 

American Plan. European PI in 



WeWillVayyou 

A Dollar a Day 
FOR LIFE I 



For iecaring the grra t.--.t nu inker of $1 lubscriptlon* 

to PEARSON'S MAUAZINE before December 1st. 
1902, beside* pa yon > frenerom commiiutoD on 
every order. An taeoM of HM * year for life, par- 
able in monthly or quarterly instalment*. Thie i* the 
largest prize ever offered in the world for work 
which need interfere with do one'e regular pursuit 
Under the Life \ <■.-.<,. > TabU*e <N Y. Btate) It 
means ^1 5, « A3 to the boy or girl of 18 yean; M t 9«S8 
to the man or woman of 40; anVquste provision for 
old age to all. PBARfiOH'B, 'tl.i.iifh not yet three 
years old. has over 2">V.UW circulation and is the big- 
trerft dollar* t-wortfa in the nuhcwriM Bald. To simply 

show a copy and explain iU nit-i its mean* an order iii the 
tfreat majority of cum*. U I'm*. tl.Mt. 3*1 Pi it* 
11.095 ; 4th Wise. *730 — all in ca«h annuities. Am- 
bitious workers of any age who want to get on In the 
world are earnestly requt-ftterl to write at once to the 
undersigned for full particular* Give local refer- 
ences No einerience nqairaL Pn tuple copies and 
tmb'ci iiitiuQ blanks furu -Led. AgvnU M Milled, 

T5hc Pearson Publishing Co. 
43-45 E. 19th St., ^ x « NEW YORK 



T. E. ROCK 

MANUFACTURER AND DEALER IN 

Harness, Saddles, Blankets, Etc. 

Horse Boots made to order. 
Track Work a specialty. . . 
219 Ellis St , bet. Mason and Taylor, S. F. 

«i»Telephonc: Folsom2982. 




Investigation bring* Manifold satisfaction 
Learn of the pent-t rating, sool lilng, anti- 
septic and marvelous beating power of 

VETERINARY PIXINE. 

Chronic scratches, grease heel that defied treat- 
ment Tor years, mud fever, hopple chafes, speed 
cracks, abscesses, inflammatory swellings, sting- 
ing, burning soi-es hoof rot, mange and all skin 
diseases absolutely cured, after every other known 
resource fails. Heals without scab, stimulates 
growth of hair-natural color. There exists no 
remedy so all-powerful and unfailing. It is the 
one scientific, guaranteed veterinary oiutment 
Money back if it fails. 

2 oz , 25c; 8 oz , 50c; 5-lb. pkg., $4 

At all Druggists anil Dealers, or sent prepaid 

a. w.THtt CO. 

PACIFIC COAST AQENTS, 

511) Mission St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Troy Chemical Co., Manufacturers, Troy, N. Y. 

F.eicl Draoglit Stallions 

FOR SALE- 
hi inn REGISTERED NO 0438. Weight 
1830 . bn , d by j D Patterson. Oxnard, 
Cal; foaled April 18, 181)8. Sire. Leopold 4250 by 
imp Louis 3299: dam, Henrietta II 5779 by imp 
Montebelle 3298; second dam, imp. Ladv Henri- 
etta I 2449 

iMARftlll's REGISTERED NO 9017. 
ITI/MVVJUI-. Weight 1800; bred by J D. Pat- 
terson, Oxnard. Cal : foaled March 25, 1895, Sire, 
imp. Montebelle 3298 by Ca;sar; dam imp. Maria 
I 245(1 by Hercules. 

These Stallions are tirst-class and their sires 
and dams are among the noted prize-winners in 
Europe. For price and further particulars ad- 
dress AMERICAN BEET SUGAR CO., 123 Cali- 
fornia Street, San Francisco. 



High Clas3 Saddle Horse 
FOR SALE. 

DAY GELDING, 6 YEARS OLD, ABOUT 16 
L> hands, weighs about 1U50 lbs. Stylish, hand- 
some, perfectly gentle and perfectly gaited: can 
travol all day. Call or address, CAPT. MELL- 
DORFER, San Francisco Riding School, Pacific 
svenue, near Polk. 



HOLSTEIN CATTLE. 

SLEEPY HOLLOW RANCH, SAN ANSELMO, MARIN CO,, CAL. 

I OFFER FOR SALE 

Johanna 5th's PAUL DE KOL 22372 H.F.H.B. 

His dam, Johanna 5th, has official record at 4 years: milk 
89.3 lbs. one day, 16,186.5 lbs. one year: butter, 23.50 lbs. 
one week. His sire's dam, Duchess Clothilde, has official 
record: milk, 88.6 lbs. one day, 18,046 9 lbs. one year; 
butter, 23.05 lbs. one week. He was bred by Gillett & Son 
of Rosendale, Wis. His pedigree includes the greatest cows 
in the world. Having a number of his daughters now in 
milk and many cows in calf to him, I let him go to make 
room for my other seven premier sires. 

For further particulars address 

R. M. HOTALING. 




431 Jackson Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



Bonnie Direct 2:054 

World's Record for Pacers in First 
Season's Campaign. 

Winner of fastest 5-heat race paced in 11)00. Win- 
ner of Chamber of Commerce Stake at Detroit: 
Blue Hill Stake at Readville, and three other 
great races. Biggest money winner of "New" 
Pacers of 1900, having $7,575 to hiscredit the first 
year out. 

Sired by Direct 2:05.1, Sire ol Directly 2:03}, 
Directum Kelly 2:08>, Etc. 

Dam BON BON 2:26 (dam of Bousilene 2:14*), 
by Simmons 2:48, sire of Helen Simmons 2:11*, 
New York Central 2:13, etc. Also sire of dams of 
Owyhee 2:11, and Fereno 2:I03£, as a three-year- 
old, and winner of last season's (1900) Kentucky 
Futurity. 

Second Dam BONNIE WILKES 2:29, by George 
Wilkes 2:22. 

Third Dam BETTY VILEY, by Bob Johnson, 
thoroughbred son of Boston. 

RONNIF niRFf T is a black stallion, 16% hands high, weighs 1100 lbs. Is a good individual 
lmi\l,w i has best of feet and legs, and is absolutely sound in every way. 
BONNIE DIRECT will serve a limited number of approved mares during season of 1902, at SlOO 
the season, with return privilege if mare proves not with foal, and horse is alive and in my possession. 
Money due at time of service or upon removal of mare. Every care taken to prevent accidents or 
escapes, but no responsibility should any occur. Pasturage for mares at reasonable rates. 
Address 

C. L. GRIFFITH, 

PleaeantOD, Cal 




fummary of Three of Bonnie 
Dlreot.'s Races. 

Chamber of Commerce Stakes. $5,000, at Detroit. 

Bonnie Direct 9 5 8 1 1 1 

Anuie Thornton 14 1 13 2 2 

Hal McRwen 1 11 2 8 4dis 

Pussy Willow 8 3 11 3 3 ro 

George C. 3 4 3 4 5 ro. Cobbett 4 7 4 5 dr, Duchess 
1 1 IS 5 6 dr. Joe Wheeler 12 9 7 7 dr. Fred Wilton 
2 2 9 dis, Mt Clemens Boy 5 6 6 dr, Louis E Mid- 
dleton 6 8 12 dr, Sport 7 10 II) dr, Gamecock 10 12 
dr, Connie 13 dr, Little Frank dis. 

Time— 2:104, 2:12*, 2:133^, 2:13, ?:12*. 2:12&. 

2:13 Class, pacing, purse 11,800, at Columbus. 

Bonnie Direct 2 5 111 

Johnny Agan 1 1 2 2 3 

Lady Piper 3 2 3 4 2 

Freilmont S 3 J 3 4 

Red Light 4 4 5 dr, Prince Exum dis. 

Time-0:31. l:0Mf.. 1:34, 2:05*; 0:33- I AW. 1:38k, 
2:10*; 0:32, 1:034, 1:344,2:0754; 0:314, l:u44, 1:375*, 
2:083£: 0:31*. l:03?i, !::«. 2:08*. 

Blue Hill Stake, $3,000, at Readville. 

Bonnie Direct 1 1 1 

Sallie Hook 2 2 8 

Evolute 5 3 2 

Annie Thornton 4 4 3 

Paul Revere 3 5 4, Dark Wilkes 6 7 5, Tommy 
W. 7 6 7 Argo Director 8 8 6, Lady Allright 9 9 9, 
Beauty Spot dis, P. H. Flynn dis. 

Time-2:07X. 2:09*, 2:10*. 



The Auto-Carburettor 

For Gasoline Engines. 

In use on Motor .Cycle9, Automobiles, 
Launches, Stationary Engines 
and Flying- Machines. 

You can depend upon it to remedy all difficulties 
arising from an imperfect mixture. 
Write us for full information and prices. 

THE AVERY & JENNESS CO. 

64 S. Canal St., CHICAGO, ILL 

COCOANUT OIL CAKE 

THE BEST FEED FOR 

STOCK, CHICKENS AND PICS 

Por gale In lota to unit by 

EL DORADO UNSEED OIL WORKS CO. 

OS California Street. San K ran, -i »<•... Cal. 



January 11, 1902] 



13 



THE WASHINGTON PARK CLUB 

Chicago, Ills. 

Stakes to Close WEDNESDAY, January 15, 1902, for the 

Summer Meeting of 1902, 



Beginning* Saturday, June 21st, 
Ending Saturday, July 20th. 



Overnight Handicaps, $1000 and Upward. No Purses Less than $600. 

SPECIAL NOTICE.— No entry will be received for any of these Stakes, except upon this condition: That all disputes, claims and objections arising out of the racing, or with respect to the inter 
pretation of the conditions of any Stakes, shall be decided by the Racing Stewards present or th )se whom they may appoint, an 1 their decisions upon all points shall be final. 



FOR THREE-YEAR-OLDS. 

THE AMERICAN DKKBV-SSO.OOO A!M>EL>. 

A sweepstakes for Three-year-olds: $>5 to accompany the 
nomination. (485 additional to start; JJ0,0O) added, of which $3000 
to the second and $2000 to the third horse. A winner of a three- 
year-old stakes of the value of $3000 to carry 3 lbs.; of two such 
stakes or one of 15000, 5 lbs ; of three or more three-year-old stakes 
of the value of $3000 each, 7 lbs extra Maidens allowed 7 lbs. To 
be run the first day of the meeting — One Mile and a hu'f. 

THE SHEKIDAN STAKES— S4 O ADDED. 

A sweepstakes for Three-year-olds; $10 to accompany the 
nomination. $75 additional to start; $1000 added of which $1000 to 
the second and $500 to the third horse. A winner of a three-year- 
old stakes of the value of $1500 to carry 3 lbs.; of two such stakes 
or one of $1000, 5 lbs : of three or more three year-old stakes of the 
value of $1500 (selling stakes excepted), or of one of the value of 
$7000, 7 lbs extra. Maidens allowed 7 lbs — One mile ami a quarter. 

THE ENGLEWOOD ST .KES-*3000 ADDED. 

A sweepstakes for Fillies, three years old; $10 to accompany 
the nomination, $50 additional to start: $-2000 added, of which $100 
to the second and $200 to the third horse A winner of a three- 
year-old stakes of the value of $1500 to carry 3 lbs.; of two such 
stakes. 5 lbs ; of three or more such stakes, or of one of the value of 
$5000, 7 lbs. extra. Maidens allowed 7 lbs —One mile. 

THE DREXEL ST A K KS -#3 000 ADDED. 

A sweepstakes for Three-year-olds: $10 to accompany the 
nomination, $50 additional to start; $2000 added, of which $400 to 
the second and $M) to the third horse. A winner of a three-year- 
old stakes of the value of $.5000. or of three or more such stakes of 
the value of $1500 each, to carry 5 lbs. extra Non-winners of two 
three-year-old races of the value of $1500 each allowed 3 lbs: 
of one such race, 5 lbs.; of one of $1000, 8 lbs ; of one of $500, 12 lbs. 
Maidens allowed 17 Its.— One mile. 

FOR THREE=YEAR=0LDS AND UPWARD. 

THE MID v A Y ST A K ES— 8200CI .ADDED. 

A selling sweepstakes for Three-year-olds and upward; $10 to 
accompany the nomination. $25 additiooal for naming to start; 
$2000 added, of which $100 to the second and $200 to the third horse. 
Weights, 5 lbs above the scale. The winner to be sold at auction 
Those eDtered to be sold for $5000 to carry full weights; if for $1000, 
allowed 5 lbs.: then 3 lbs for each $500 to (3000; then I lb. for each 
$100 to $»m. Winners of a stakes this year, after the closingof 
entries and prior to June 8th, when carrying weight for age. or 



more, not to be entered for less than $1000; after June Hi h, $5000. 
Starters, with selling prices, to be named through the entry box, 
at the usual hour of closing, the day prior to the race. More than 
two can be named by the same owner, but only two in the same 
interest can start; but the starting fees must be paid for all 
named. — One mile ami a furlong. 

I HE AIIISCKN STAKES #2000 ADDED. 

A selling sweepstakes for Three-year-olds and upward; $10 to 
accompany the nomination, $25 additional for naming to start; 
$2000 added, of which $)00 to the second aud $200 to the third horse. 
The winner to bo sold at auct'on. Those entered to be sold for 
$4o;k) to carry weight for age: for $3000, allowed 5 lbs; then 8 lbs. 
for each $500 to $2000; then lib for each $100 to $l(X)0. Winners of a 
stakes this year, after the closing of entries and prior to June 8th. 
when carrying weight for age, or more not to be entered for less 
than $3000; after June 8th, $4000. Starters, with selling prices, to 
be named through the entry box, at the usual hour of closing, the 
day prior to the race More than two can be named by the same 
owner, but only two in the same interest can start: but the start- 
ing fees must be paid forall named —One mile ami half a fwlong. 

THE OAKWOOD H A ND I C V I>— « 2500 ADDED. 

A sweepstakes for Three-year-olds and upward; 110 to accom- 
pany the nomination, $50 additional to start; $2500 added, of which 
$400 to the second and $200 to the third horse Weights to be an- 
nounced three days before; the race. A winner of any race after 
the weights are posted to carry 5 lbs extra.— One mile and a 
furlong. 

THE GREAT WESTERN HANDICAP — #3000 ADDED. 

A sweepstakes for Three-year olds and upward: $10 to accom- 
pany the nomination. $5') additional to start; $3000 added, of which 
$750 to the second aud $250 to the third horse. Weights to bo an- 
nounced three days before the race A winner of any race after 
the weights are posted to carry 5 lbs. extra —One mile and a half. 

THE VOU.NG HANDICAP -S5000. 

For Three-year-olds and upward: $10 to accompany the nomi 
nation, $75 additional to start; $5(1110 added, of which $750 to the 
second and $250 to the third horse. Weights to be announced 
three days before the race A wiunerof any race after the weights 
are posted to carry 5 lbs. extra — One mite, one ami one-half 
furlongs. 

THE WHEELER II A NDI U V P — #7 500 ADDED, 

A sweepstakes for Three-year-olds aud upward; $10 to accom- 
pany the nomination. $125 additional to start; $7500 added, of which 
$1000 to the second and $5tM to the third horse Weights to bo an- 
nounced three days before the race. A winner of auy race after 
the weights are posted to carry 5 lbs. extra.— One mile and a quarter. 



FOR TW0=YEAR=0LDS.. 

THE LAKESIDE STAKES — S2 OOO ADDED. 

A sweepstakes for Fillies, two years old; $10 to accompany 
the nomination. $50 additional to start; $2000 added, of which $400 
to the second and $2iXl to the third horse. A wiDnor of a stakes of 
the value of $1000 to carry 3 lbs : of two such stakes, 5 lbs.; of three 
or more such stakes, 7 lbs. extra. Maidens allowed 5 lbs.— Five 
furlongs. 

THE KENWOOD STAKES— S3 OOO ADDED. 

A sweepstakes for Colts, two years old; $10 to accompany the 
nomination. $50 additional to start; $8000 added, of which $-iuo to 
the second and $200 to the third horse. A winner of a stakes of the 
value of $11100 to carry 8 lbs ; of two such stakes, 5 lbs.; of three or 
more such stakes, 7 lbs extra. Maidens allowed 5 I be. — Five 
furlongs. 

THE MAY WOOD STAKES— 88,000 ADDED. 

A sweepstakes for Two-year olds; $10 to accompany the nom- 
ination $50 additional to start; $2,000 added, of which $100 to the 
second and $200 to the third horse. A winner of a stakes of the 
value of $1,000 to carry 3 lbs : of two such stakes, 5 lbs.; of three or 
more such stakes, 7 lbs. extra. Maidens allowed 5 lbs. Five fur- 
ongs. 

THE EDGEW\TER STAKES-#3.000 ADDED. 

A sweepstakes for Two-year-olds; $10 to accompany the nom- 
ination, $50 additional to start; $2,000 added, of which $400 to the 
second and $200 to the third horse. A winner of a stakes of the 
value of $1,000 to carry 3 lbs.; of two such stakes, or of the Lakeside, 
Kenwood or May wood Stakes, 5 lbs ; of three or more such stakes, 
7 lbs. extra. Maidens allowed 5 lbs. Five and a half furlongs. 

THE QUICKSTEP ST » K ES— S'i.Oon ADDED. 

A sweepstakes for Two-year-olds; $10 to accompany the nom- 
ination, $50 additional to start: $2,000 added, of which $100 to the 
second and $21x1 to the third horse. A winner of a stakes to carry 
3 lbs.; of two stakes, 5 lbs.: of three or more stakes, 7 lbs. extra. 
Maidens allowed 7 lbs. Four furlongs. 

THE HYDE PARK STAKES— S5.000 ADDED 

A sweepstakes for Two-year-olds; $10 to accompany the nom- 
ination, $100 additional to start; $5,000 added, of which $1,000 to the 
second and $500 to the third horse. A winner of a stakes of the 
value of $1000 to carry 3 lbs ; of two such stakes. 5 lbs ; of three or 
more such stakes, or of the Edgewater Stake3, 8 lbs. extra. Maid- 
ens allowed 5 lbs. Six furlongs. 

THE LAKE VIEW HANDICAP — $2,000 ADDED 

A sweepstakes for Two-year-olds; $10 to accompany the 
nomination, $50 additional to start; $2,000 added, of which $400 to 
the second and $200 to the third horse Weights to be announced 
t wo days before the race Six furlongs. 




The Fast and Game Race 
Horse 

REY DIRECT 2:10 

By Direct, 2:05J. Sire of Directly 2:03}, and 

25 others in standard time. 
Dam Vera (Dam of Rey Direct 2:10 and De 

Veras2:llJ) by Kentucky Volunteer. 

Will in«» <• to- »«•! t IH02 at 

LOS ANGELES 

TERMS IOIC THE SEASON » (it) 

Payable at time of service, with return privilege. 
Rey Direct is as sure a foal getter as any horse In 
America. 



Racing! Racing! Racing! 



For tabulated, pedigree. and^fuli particulars, address 



GEO. A. DAVIS, Pleasanton, Cal. 



TRAIN YOUR HORSES 

AT NAPA TRACK. 

"^O SAFER OR BETTER TRACK IN CALl- 
fornia on which to work and train horses. 
Large, roomy box stalls in first-class condition for 
rent at $2 per month. A reduction made In rental 
according to number of stalls taken The best 
elimate on earth. Miles of clean, dry roads to jog 
on during rainy season Transportation by car or 
boat to San Francisco. Hay and grain of best 
quality at low prices. Correspond with 

ARTHUR H. BROWN, Napa, Cal. 



CALIFORNIA 

Photo Engraving Company 

HIGH CLASS ART 
IN 

JJalj 7 ones and Line Engraving 

Artistic Designing. 
513 Market Street, San Francisco 



Please note that the Entrance Fee must accompany nominations. Turfmen failing to receive entry blanks can obtain them by application to tho Secretary, to whom all communications should be 
addressed, or at the office of the Bkeeder and Sportsman. 

JAMES HOWARD Secretary, Sixty-first St. and South Park Ave., CHICAGO. 

Sawyer House Bar, 

Cor. Devisadero and Fulton Sts , S. F. 

D. LIEG1NGER, - Prop. 

LI EADQUARTERS FOR HORSEMEN. THE 
11 place to stop on a drive to the Park and Cliff. 
Only the best brands of Wines, Liquors and Cigars 
In stock. 

ONE 

Tablet 
LEG AND BODY WASH 

For Fevered Lees, inflamed tendons, 
sprained ankles, cracked heels and all skin 
eruptions. Will not bllsteror affect the kidneys 
Unexcelled as a brace. 
The most effective, 
Tho most economical ! 
The most convenient j 

One tablet furnishes more genuine Witch Ha- 
zel than is contained in 40 gallons of the best 
extract, besides possessing other valuable in- 
gredients In Its makeup. 

Put upin metal boxes In two sizes. 
Regular or $2 size contains 120 tablets. 6 
boxes for $lO. Small or $1 size contains 
50 tablets. 6 boxes for $5. 

Sent post-paid on receipt of price. 
BOYCE TABLET CO., TERRE HAUTE, IND 

for eale by Druggists and Dealer* in Harness &. Turf Goods, 



New California Jockey CliD 



Season 1901-1902 

OAKLAND RACE TR\CK 

Racing MONDAY, TUESDAY, WEDNESDAY 
THURSDAY, FRIDAY and SATURDAY 
RAIN OR SHINE. 
Five or More Rai'ea Each Day. 

Races start at 2:15 p. m. sharp 
Fern boats leave Kan Francisco at 12 m , 12:30, 
1:00 1:30. 2:00. 3:00 p. m., connecting with trains 
stopping at the entrance to the track. Last two 
cars on train reserved for ladies and their escorts. 
No smoking Buy your ferry tickets to Shell 
Mound. All trains via Oakland raolo connect with 
San Pablo avenuo electric cars at Sevonth and 
llroadway. Oakland; also all trains via Alameda 
mole connect with San Pablo avenue cars at 
Fourteenth and llroadway, Oakland. Theso elec- 
tric, cars go direct to tho track In fifteen minutes. 

Returning trains leave the track at 4:15 and 4:15 
p. m.and immediately after the last race. 

THOS a. WILLIAMS Jr . Pres. 
CHA8 F. PRICE, So. 'y anil Mgr. 



Public Training Stable 

PLEASANTON RACE TRACK 

WANTED— A few Good Horses for winter train- 
" lng and developing for speed next season. 
Among the horses broken, trained and developed 
by me are Anzella 2:10^, Antrima 2:151*. Glenella 
(p) 2:l«><, Alexia (p) 2:18 Anniglto (p) 2:21, Lady 
R. E D. 2:lfi5£. etc. Best of care and handling 
assured. Terms reasonable. 

GEO. A. KELLY, Pleasanton. 




J. GOLDSTEIN 
343 Third Street 

pAYS THE HIGHEST PRICES for Gentle 
1 men's good Cast-off Clothing. Give him a trial. 

BLAKE, M0FFITT & T0WNE 

DKALKBH IN 



66-67-69-61 First Street, S. P 

T EBLPIIONB MAIN IDS 




SLINIMENT. 



Chronic Bronchitis and Catarrh of the Bladder 

Cured in IK Hours. 



CAPSULES 



1 



f 



Superior to .Copaiba, Cubebs or Injection 



14 



[January 11, 1802 




THE BAYWOOD STUD 

THE BUNGALOW, SAN MATEO, CAk 

(Property of John Parrott, Esq.) 
levoted Exclugively to the Breeding and Training of 

High Stepping 
Hackney-Bred 
Harness Horses 



HERE'S AN OPPORTUNITY 



STANDARD BRED 
MARES AND FILLIES 

FROM $40 UP. 

Many of Them are Registered and Nearly All Can Be. 
Write for Prices and Particulars. 

The owner, Hon. JESSE D. CARR, Salinas, wants to soli them immediately. 
Is not in need of the money, but is getting too old (87) to keep on breeding Horses. 
Will sell one or more and will give any one a big bargain that will take them -all 
This is the best opportunity ever offered in California to get big values for money- 



Almeda C— Brown Ally, foaled January, 1893. 

Sire, Gabilan; dam, Emma. Registered in 

Vol. 13, Rule 7, as standard. Bred to Boodle Jr. 
Delight— Bay Ally, foaled February 15, 1897. Sire, 

Eugineer; dam, Flossie. No marks. Bred to 

Boodle Jr. 

Bertha— Dark brown mare. Sire, Carr's Mam- 
brino; dam, Emma. Has not foaled yet. 

Belle-Black Ally, foaled March 20, 1893. Sire, 
Alpheus Wilkes; dam, Lady Nelson. Bred to 
Bood 1 © J r 

Trlx-Black Ally, foaled April 30, 1899. Sire, Ecoe; 
dam, Belle. 

Necessity— Light bay Ally, foaled February 23, 
1897. Sire, Magenta: dam, Unique. 

Dora— Bay Ally, foaled April 3, 1890. Sire, Reno; 
dam, Martha. Bred to Major 

Epha-Bay Ally, foaled April 24. 1892. Sire, Eugi- 
neer; dam, Puss. Registered in Vol. XIII. 
Bred to Boodle Jr. 

EUie-Light bay Ally, foaled March 25, 1895. Sire, 
Boodle; dam, Mary C. Bred to Nutwood 
Wilkes. 

Eda— Chestnut sorrel Ally, foaled April 19, 1895. 
Sire, Hambletonian Wilkes; dam, Gabilan 
Maid. Bred to Boodle Jr. 

Flossie— Brown mare. Sire, Carr's Mambrlno; 
dam, Gray Eagle mare brought from Ken- 
tucky. Vol. XIII. Bred to Boodle Jr. 

Gabilan Girl— Brown Ally foaled April 8, 1892. 
Sire, Gabilan; dam, Clara. Vol. XIII. Bred 
to Major 

Queen Begs-Brown Ally, foaled April 3, 1900. 

Sire, Boodle Jr.; dam, Gabilan Girl. 
Little Ora— Brown Ally, foaled March 17, 1897 

Sire, Eugineer; dam Lilly B. 
Jane— Bay mare Sire, Carr's Mambrino; dam 

Ballot Box. Bred to Major 
Juanlta Bay Ally, foaled March 26, 1896. Sire, 

Bay Rum; dam Lucky Girl. Bred to Boodle Jr. 
Kitty 8.— Sorrel filly, foaled April 22, 1900. Sire, 

Nutwood Wilkes; dam, Flossie. 
Flora— Bay Ally, foaled February 24, 1892. Sire, 

Reno; dam, Lady Palmer. Bred to Major. 
Fanchon— Bay Ally, foaled April 13, 1898. Sire, 

Eoce: dam, Jane. 
Lady Palmer— Bay mare. Sire, Carr's Mam- 
brino; Arst dam by Luciona, he by Whipple 

Hambletonian. Vol. XIII , Rule, 7. Bred to 

Major. 

Llldlne Bay Ally, foaled March 28, 1894. Sire, 

Boodle; dam Gabilan Maid Vol. XIII., Rule, 

VI. Bred to Nutwood Wilkes. 
AJlegra— Bay Ally, foaled April 27, 1899. Sire, 

Ecoe; dam Jane. 
Martha— Bay mare. Sire, Mambrino Jr.; dam, 

Gabilan Maid. Bred to Major. 



Lilly B —Black mare (16 hands). Sire, Homer 

dam, Maggie Lee Registered as standard in 

Vol VI Bred to Major 
Lucky Girl— Bay Ally, foaled May 24, 1889 Sire, 

Carr's Mambrino: dam, Flossie. Bred to 

Boodle Jr. 

Miss Judy— Bay Ally, foaled April 4, 1900 Sire, 

Boodle Jr.; dam, Jane. 
Nancy— Bay mare Sire. Mambrino Jr.; dam, 

Gabilan Maid. Bred to Boodle Jr. 
Peerless— Bay Ally, foaled April 5, 1891. Sire, 

Gabilan; dam. Jane. Bred to Major. 
Comfort— Brown Ally, foaled May 25, 1898. Sire, 

Magenta; dam Janet. 
Surprise— Brown mare. Sire, Abbotsford, son of 

Woodford Mambrino; Arst dam, Minnie by 

Ladd's Kentucky Hunter. Bred to Boodle Jr. 
Sausal Maid— Dark brown Ally, foaled Januarys. 

1892. Sire, Gabilan; dam, Flossie. Vol. XIII, 

Rule VI. Bred to Boodle Jr. 
Taddie J.- Sorrel Ally, foaled April 2, 1896 Sire, 

Bay Rum; dam, Mary C. Bred to Boodle Jr. 
Mary C.— Bay mare, foaled April 8, 1898. Sire, 

Antevolo 7648; dam, Gabilan Maid. Bred to 

Boodle Jr. 

Ruby M — Bay Ally, foaled March 28, 1898. Sire, 

Ecce: dam, Flora 
Jenny Wren— Bay Ally, foaled April 21. 1900. 

Sire, Boodle Jr,; dam, Flora. 
Claire-Bay Ally, foaled May 10 1899 Sire, Punch: 

dam. Lady St Clair 
Beatrice Golden— Chestnut sorrel Ally, foaled 

April 20, 1900. Sire, Boodle Jr : dam, Lady 

Comstock Jr. 
Ontario-Bay Ally, foaled April 21, 1898. Sire, 

Magenta; dam, Lucky Girl 
Miss Nobody— Gray Ally, foaled March 26, 1897. | 

Sire, Magenta: dam, Martha. 
Julia Dean— Bay Ally, foaled April 13, 1898. Sire, 

Ecce: dam, Martha. 
Pobrecita— Black Ally, foaled April 9, 1900. Sire, 

Boodle Jr.; dam, Martha. 
Helen Could— Bay Ally, foaled March 39, 1900. 

Sire, Boodle Jr.; dam. Miss Beauty. 
Miss Nan— Dark gray Ally, foaled March 6, 1897. 

Sire, Magenta; dam, Nancy. 
Delta-Dark bay Ally, foaled Maich 21, 1900. Sire, 

Boodle Jr.; dam, Nancy. 
Queen Mab— Sorrel Ally, foaled April II, 1900. 

Sire, Nutwood Wilkes; dam, Nina B. 
Little Dorrit— Gray Ally, foaled March 14, 1897. 

Sire. Magenta; dam. Rita V. 
Adelaide— Dark gray Ally, foaled February 20, 

1897. Sire, Magenta, dam, Surprise. 
Evening Star— Black Ally, foaled March 28, 1898. 

Sire, Magenta; dam, Sausal Maid. 



VETERINARY. 



Ira Barker Dalziel 

VETERINARY DENTIST 

Fancy Carriage, Saddle and Road Horses for Sale 

Office and stable: 605 Golden Gate Avenue, San 
Francisco, Cal. Telephone South 651. 



M. R. C. V. S., F. E. V. M. S. 

VETERINARY SURGEON. 

Member of the Royal College of Veterinary 
Surgeons, England; Fellow of the Edinburg 
Veterinary Medical Society; Graduate of the New 
Veterinary College, Edinburgh; Veterinary Sur- 
geon to the S. F. Fire Department; Live Stock 
Inspector forNew Zealand and Australian Coloniea 
at the port of San Francisco: Professor of Equine 
Medicine, Veterinary Surgery, Veterinary Depart- 
ment University of California: Ex-President of 
the California State Veterinary Medical Associa- 
tion; Veterinary InArmary, Residence and Office, 
San Francisco Veterinary Hospital. 1117 Golden 
Gate Avenue, near Webster St., San Francisco: 
Telephone West 128. 



BREEDERS' DIRECTORY. 



HOI.STEINS— Winners of every 7 days' butter 
contest at State Fair 1899 1st & 2d for aged cows, 
4-yr., 3-yr. and 2-yr.-olds; 21 Jerseys and Durhams 
competing. 5th year my Holsteins have beaten 
Jerseys for butter. Stock for sale; also pigs. F. 
H. Burke, 636 Market St., S. F. 



VERBA BUENA JERSEYS— The best A.J 
C. C. registered prize herd is owned by Henrj 
Pierce, San Francisco. Animals for sale. 

JERSEYS, HOLSTEINS AND DURHAMS. 

Dairy Stock specially. Hogs, Poultry. Estab- 
lished 1876. William Niles & Co. Los Angeles, 
Cal. 



A YRSHIRES — Young Bulls. Cows and Heifers. 
Registered. From prize winning families. 
SHORTHORNS— Of the famous Golden Drop 
family. All stock registered and sold on both 
blood lines and Individuality. Brown & Brandon, 
Petaluma, Cal. 



SUNSET 
LIMITED 

One of the most magnificent 
trains ever built. For 1901-1902 
TRI-weekly via Coast Line and 
Sunset Route for 

NEW ORI/iAIVS and 
NLW YORK 

Leave SAN FRANCISCO 4:50 p m. 

Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays 

Leave LOS ANOELES 8:30 a, m 

Tuesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays 

Arrive NEW ORLEANS 7:20 p m. 
Thursdays, Saturdays. Mondays 



Address JESSE D. CARR, Salinas, Cal. 



ASTHM A CUR E FREE! 

Asthmalene Brings [Instant Relief and Permanent 
Cure in AH Cases. 
Sent Absolutely Free on Receipt of Postal. 



Among the world's noted High- 
ways of Travel not one equals 
the route of this train. 
Get the little book, "Wayside 
Notes," from any agent of the 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC 

Initial trip of Sunset Limited 
Friday, Dec. 6, from San Francisco 



CHAWED t 
f OR. ten 

EARS 

v 




There -is nothing like Asthmalene. It brings 

It cures 



instant relief, even in the worst cases, 
when all else fails. 

The Rev. C. F. Wells, of Villa Ridge, 111., says: "Your 
trial hottle of Asthmalene received in good condition. I can- 
not tell you how thankful I feel for the good derived from it. 
I was a slave, chained with putrid sore throat and asthma for 
ten years. I despaired of ever being cured. I saw your ad- 
vertisement for the cure of this dreadful and tormenting dis- 
ease, asthma, and thought you had overspoken yourselves, 
but resolved to give it a trial. To my astonishment the trial 
acted like a charm. Send me a full-size bottle " 

We want to send to every sufferer a trial treatment of 
Asthmalene, similar to the one" that cured Mr. Wells. We'll 
send it hy mail POSTPAID, ABSOLUTELY FREE OF 
CHARGE, to any sufferer who will write for it, even on a postal. Never mind, 
though you are despairing, however bad your case, Asthmalene will relieve and 
cure. The worse your case, the more glad we are to send it. Do not delay. 
Write at once, addressinfj DR. TAFT BROS.' MEDICINE CO., 79 East 130th St., 
N. Y. City. Sold by aU : DruggiBts. 



Seldom See 

a big knee like this, but 
your horse may have a 
bunch or bruise on his An- 
kle, Hock, Stitle, Knee or 
Throat. 

ABS0RBINE;;«- 

without laving the horse up. 
Circulars if you want them, 
$2.00 per bottle, delivered. 
W. F. YOUNG, P. D. F., 

Sprinirflpbl. Mass. 

For sale by Mack & Co., LangleyJt Michaels Co , 
Redington & Co , J. O'Kane, and J. A. McKerrou, 
all or San Francisco. 



HEALDS 



BUSINESS COLLEGE 
24 Post Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

The oldest, the largest, the mast popular com- 
mercial school on the Pacific Coast. 18,000 gradu- 
ates: 25 teachers: 60 typewriters; over 300 students 
annually placed in positions. Send for catalogue. 

E. P. HEA1D, Pretiden 



KENNEL ADVERTISEMENTS 



Nineteenth Annual Trials 

OF THE 

Pacific Coast 
Field Trials Club 

TO BE RUN AT 

Santa Maria 

SANTA HAR1JAKA COUNTY 

Commencing Monday, Jan. 13, 1902 



Members' Stake 

Annual Derby 

All-Aged Stake 

Champion Stake 



Entries ror All- Aged Stake close Dec. IS, 1001 
W. S. TEVIS. 

President. 
No. 



ALBERT BETZ, 

•Secretary. 
01 Parrott BnUdg, 8. F , Cal. 

«S-For Entry Blanks and information address the 
Secretary. 



HOUNDS FOR SALE CHEAP. 

TWO HOUND DOGS. ONE IS ONE YEAR 
•*- old. Fox and Bloodhound cross and was used 
on deer this year. The other, six months old, out 
of a Foxhound by a Blue Ribbon Deerhound Or 
will trade for a couple of good young Pointers or 
Setters. Address 

BEN J. T , Auburn, Cal. 



(The World's Champion Bull Terrier) 

AT STUD 



Apply to 



L. A. KLEIN 

3570 Gear; St., San Francisco. 



AT STUD 



CUBA OF KENWOOD 

(Qlenbeigb Jr.— Stella) 
SAM'S BOW 
(Plain Sam— Dally Dee II) 

STOGKDALE KENNELS 

K. M. DODGE, Manager, 
Bakemrleld , Kern Co., 

Boarding. Pointer Puppies and well-broken 

Dogs for sale. 



Diseases 



Ho ~w to F* ood 

Mailed Free to any address by the 
author, H. Clay Glover, D. V. S., 
1278 Broadway, New York. 




MID - DOGS WITH PIANOE 

tTTO CUIlt TMtM WITH MANDASDOIl Or TAR. 

-IND roe OKWJIU iciiiioKHLsaronM urm 

-STA NDARD DlilSFtf T.VNTCO Cl eveland 



H. F. LORQUIN 



TAXIDKKMIST 



Dealer in Naturalists' Supplies 

CCIENTIFIC MOUNTING OF BIRDS, RUGS, 
^ Heads, Animals, Fishes, Reptiles, Insects 

319 Kearny St. (upstairs) San Francisco. 

Phone, Black 53£! 



Mark Levy & Co. 



MARK LEW 
Expert Cutler 
and fitter... 
fine Suit] 
from 

HS.OO up 




Onlv the 
Be>i Help 
Employed... 
All work 
done on the 



36 Geary Si. . S. f. Rooms 10-20 Phone Grant 158 



Flint Carriage Hardware Co 

31 BEALE ST , SAN FRANCISCO 

"TvEALERS IN WHIPS, SPONGES, CHAMOIS 
- L -' Racing and Trotting Plates and Horse Shoes, 
Plate and Horse Shoe Nails, Rubber Pads and 
English Bar Pads, Springs, Axles, Iron, Steel, eto. 



JANUARY 11, 1902| 



15 



The Pacing 
Gelding . . . 



BILLY ANDREWS 2:06 



Nothing m ms ciass or on 
speedway can beat him. 

2 Handsome and mannerly. 



And the other horses in / AWAY ^l^ 1 Very fasl and 
training at Empire Farm^"^ 1 *"l*74 reliable. 



MISS 1RMA 2:174 | WILQUE 



An M. & M. 
Stake Horst . 



The Sale Sensation of the ffeto Wear. 

TOTA l_ DISPERSAL O P" THE 

f~\ TEMJW VALLEy STOCK FAUM ^\ 

.09 « 



ABO VT 160 OF THE BEST BRED TROTTERS ON EARTH 
INCLUDING 



I HI 

lilCitiUST 
MOM.1 WINNER 
FROM THE GREATEST 
MONEY W INNING FAMILY. 



f M THE GREATEST SON OF BARON WILKES ^^^t 

Mnd baron 



?, 3, AND 
5-YEAR OLD 
RACE WINNER' 



MONEY WINNING FAMILY. INCLUDING THE 

total w innings nearly $30,coo. | Sire of WRE A M E*R, 3 , 2:141 and other dinner \s\ Kentucky futurity of i»9s 



ED. WINTER, 4, 2:12' 120 Record Mares 



\Vith foul by Oak- 
land Baron, etc. 



DIRECTOR JOE 



By Diiei tor. out or 
J*»o F.tU M n s dam. 



M A ^ Thewa.-lia.nt aata.gorvist of 

>^r^ W\j Allerton 

\} ^ A King of High-Wheel Racing S1 



'he Premier of 

Mt. Kisco 
Barm 



3 



A King of High-Wheel Racing SteJlions 

The sire of game "Do-or-Die" Money Winners. 
Together with a choice consignment of young raxing trotters— none better 



3 



AT THE 



MID-WINTER 
HORSE AUCTION, 

Jan. 27--reb. 1 

Madison Square 

Garden, New York. 




Complete Dispersal oj- 

MARSHLAND STUD 

Everything except the weanlings to be sold at next Old 
Glory) including notable speed producers, mates fioni great 
families and a grand lot of 2 and 3-year-olds, headed by 

ADVERTISER 2:I5J 

Greatest Klectioneer-Wilkes Stallion. 
Sire of Adbell (1) 2:12, world's champion yearling trotter,' 
sold for $10,000, etc. 



Attractive consignment of young 
trotters, almost entirely the get of 
the race horse sire 



DIRECT 



From JAMES BUTLER'S EASTVIEW FA-RM. including the sister of 
DIRECTUM KELLY 2:08^; MISS BEATRICE 2:l3'/ 4 ,etc. The 2 and 3- 
yea.r-oIds heavily engaged in rich futurities t>f 1902 and 1903. 

A world of spee d in thh l ot, and t hey will be in condition to no right into the tian.rr h, in flS 



Kingmond 2:09 

Perfect manners and can speed with 
the fastest. 



Who Is It 2:10i 

Quarters in .29'4 sec. Gentleman's horse in 
looks, manoers and speed. 



KLing 2:13i 

GreeD trotter of 1901. Quarters .31 sec. No 
boots or rigging. 



Axtello 2:15 

Trial 2:18Vi., Game in races. None choicer 
for road or tnatiDee. 



LOUISE MAG 2:09 



3 Trotting star of 
" 1899. 

4 Can trot in 2:07. 



JAMES SHEVLIN 2:131 ~ 



CASTLETON 2:10i 



Grandly bred son of Wil- 
ton. Game Rate Horse. 
Successful Sire. 



MOSUL 2;09i Virgmia's Fastest. 



Speed « ay 

Favorite. 



MOTH MILLER 2:07 



Lord of the Manor 



Brother of Lad> of the 
Manor. t:<HH. 



Kentucky Wilkes Jr. 1 2:28 



1 Grand prospect for 3 

2 of the Futurities. 



Adaria 4, 2:\7\ 



A 2:10 Trotter. 



APROSE 



Unquestionably the best bred 
of young stallions. 



,V fromMr. ES MAMARONECK FARM "'"uVm ISn'olirA.' 
W B Oideimans ""inN Ull LU l\ I Mllltl and individuality. 



SOME OF THE 

BILLY ANDREWS. 2 :06 Vi 
OAKLAND BARON.2:09V 4 

MOSUL 2:09% 

LOUISE MAC 2:09% 

DAIS V J 2:08>4 

CASTLETON 2:10'/* 

MINNIE I* 2:10y 3 

COAST BOY 12:10>/ 2 

BKENNAN 2 :11 Vi 

GItACIE 0NWARD.2 :12 

EQUITY 2:1214 

JACK 2:12Vi 

QUEEN ALFRED. .2 :12'/i 

ALBERTA 2:12'/, 

ED WINTERS . . .2 :12% 
JAMES SHEVLIN. 2 :13 Vi 
1'AUKVILLE 

l'RINCE 2:13Vi 

GLENMERE BOY .2:14 V, 
ELEANOR W 2 :15 



LADY l'RINCE 



, .2 :J6W 



AWAY 2:15% 

MISS IRMA 2:17% 

HELEN FIFE 2:18 

BESSIE WILKES- 
WOOD (3) 2 :20 

WILKES 2:20 

ANITA S 2:20 

C. H. BLODGETT.2:20'/ t 

DIDO .... ." 2:20Vi 

PEARL J 2 

KING MUSCOVITE2 :21 V, 

MAGNEITA 2 21 Va 

HULLY GEE 2 :22 !4 

BELLE ARLING- 
TON 2:23'/i 

QUEEN MARCH. ..2:23% 

WEST EDDY 2:2.-|'/i 

JAQUENITA (3) . 2:20 

I HE MAINE 2 :20',i 

MA KG A RITE 2 /MY, 

FRENZY (2) ... v .2 :27 V. 

YUBADEE 2:27% 

ADDIE C 2 :28Vi 

ROSA S. .: 2:28V t 

AGNES HUNTING- 
TON 2 :28% 

I.IVADIA 2:*9V. 



RECUKU HORSES. 

WILL LEYBURN..2:06 
MOTH MILLER . .2 :07 

PERHAPS 2:08 

KINGMOND ...... .2 :09 

JASPER AYRES . .2 :09 

AGITATO 2:09 

OTT1NGER 2:09% 

WHO IS IT 2:10% 

DELMARCH 2:ll'/ 3 

DARNETTE 2:12% 

MZEUS 2:13 

KING 2:1314 

MEDIUMWOOD ...2:1314 

JUNEMONT 2 :14 

BELLE CANNON . . 2 :14 % 

MARION 2:14% 

SAM L 2 :14% 

DOG MILLER 2 :15 

AXTELLO ...2:15 

ADVERTISER 2:15% 

HALO ,.2 :15V, 

NETTIE B 2: 16'/, 

JOHN TAYLOR ..2:10% 

DIRECT1NA 2:10% 

COLUMBUS S 2:17 . 

ADAIMA (4) 2:17'/, 

VALENTINE 2:18'/. 

•WALTER F 2:1!) 

ETALKA MAID . .2 : 1 Vi 

EFFIE G 2:19 % 

WILKES 2:20 ■ 

GEN. SH AFTER . .2:2014 

LULU R :2 :20K 

BLACK BEAU I Y. .2 !21% 

BILLY S 2:22'/, 

PUBLICATION ...2:22% 

ABERDEEN 2:22'/, 

NOLA APPLETON . 2 :22 K 

RED CLIFFE 2 :23\\ 

MARY ..: 2:24 

LIKTNA WILKES. 2 :24 V, 

PEARL A 2 :24 14 

FLORA WILKES. .2 :24 ' , 

CDIMAX 2:20', 

KENTUCKY WILKES. 

JR. (2) 2:28V. 

LEELAND 2:29% 

ANITA 2:29% 

HUMBIRD 2:30 



Sure winner In 
1892. 

Good for 2:10. 



GRACIE ONWARD 2:12 



WORTHIER 



By Advertiser out ol dam ol SunO) 
2:08!4. Can beat 2.15. Grandest 
young stock horse in America. 



RED CLIFF 2:%3l 



| One ot the Grand- 
est Trotters in 
Amerlctjr. 



McZEUS 2:13 



For Stud, Track or Road. 
Brother of CONEY 2:02. 



Drove' Nico out In 
2:08K. 



EQUITY 2:124' 



ALBERTA 2:12 



I On hall mile 
m track. 



BLACK BEAUTY 



Record 2 J\X on half mile lrnc| ( . 
Trial i :i >, hJ.tr In 1 10< Nolh 
in:' c(iual<i bim iu his class. 



Mr. Bigelow abandons racing for yachting and sells 
"~ his stable, Including: 

WILL LEYBURN 2:06 
JASPER AYRES 2:09 
DARNETTE 2:\2\ 



THIS 



THE GREATEST OF* ALL WINTER SALES. • \A/E HAVE THE G< 



• 600 HORSES. 



Sa t±S e « 600 Head - FASIG-TIPTON CO. 



MADISON SQUARE GARDEN 
NEW YORK CITY. 



16 



[January 11, 190 



TELEPHONE: 

South 640 



t we Harness 




'ORSE BOOTS 



San Francisco, Cal. 



REMINGTON 




U.M.C 




303 and 30-30 _ FO r— 
CALIBERS 



CARTRIDGES 

SAVAGE RIFLES 



Since their introduction in 1816 they have been known all- 
over the world for their brilliant shooting qualities, 
being the most durable, best balanced and 
finest adjusted Shotguns ever made. 

For complete Catalogue, describing and Illustrating all our Arms, address 

Remington Arms Company. 

425-427 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

SMITH GUNS 

At the Cal. Inanimate Target Association 
May 25--26 t 1901. 

71 Shooters, 20 used Smith Guns. 

There were 11 Individual Trophies offered. 
Shooters using SMITH GUNS captured 9. 

Coast Record made by Edward Sohnltz, 112 Straight. 

Edgrar Forster, high average, 95%. Ed. Schultz and Otto Feudner, 92%. 
Webb, 91J%. E. Feudner, 89J%. Varien, 88%. F. Feudner, 87*% 
Flickinger; 87%. Shields and McCutchan, 86J%, Williamson, 86%. 

They all shot L. C. Smith Guns. 

Catalogue on application to 

HUNTER ARMS CO., Fulton, N. T. 

MIL. B. HEKKART CO., Sun Francisco, Coast lie present ut Ire. 

BALLISTITE 

The extreme high velocity and great penetration with unexcelled regularity 
of this powder erroneously cause the statement that it gives excessive breech 
and barrel pressure. The truth is, after exhaustive comparative tests, the 

PRESSURES 

of this powder are found to be, load for load and velocity for velocity, the 
lowest of any sporting powder now used, giving the lightest recoil as well as 

LOWEST 

Cartridges loaded with BALLISTITE can be obtained from the leading 
Cartridge Companies, Gun and Ammunition Dealers, or the Sole Agents. 

J. H. LAU &, CO. 



FOR 

.3 3 SAVAGE 
%?> EXPANSIVE BULLET 



are superior to any other 
make, give exceeding 
ACCURACY, 

UNIFORMITY, 

CLEANLINESS. 




LITTLE RECOIL 
AND NO SMOKE 

For catalogue of all sizes, address 

UNIONS-METALLIC CARTRIDGE CO. 

SAN FRAN CI CO, CA1. 



COAST RECORD. 

Made with SHOTGUN R1FLEITE 

EDWARD SCHULTZ 

112 Straight Targets. 

Ingleside, May 28, 1901. 



WORLD RECORD. 

Made with E. C. No. 1 

W. R. CROSBY 

345 Straight Targets. 

New York, April, 1901. 



Manufactured by THE AMERICAN "E. C." and "SCHUITZE" Gunpowder Co., Ltd. 

PHIL B BEKEART CO Pacific romi Representative 



Clabrough, Golcher & Co. 



GUNS 
Gun Goods 



*J-Heni1 for Catalogue 




FISHING 
Tackle 



S38 MARKET STREET, S F 



The "Old Reliable" Parker 



once more proves its 
right to the title, 
the Grand Ameri- 
can Handicap of 
1900. 



1st— H. D. Bates, with 59 straight kills. 
2d— J. R. Malone, with 58 straight kills. 
3d— Phil Daly Jr., with 31 straight kills. 
All used the "Old Reliable." 



75 Chambers St., New York 

A postal brings " Shooting Facts.' 



Importers and Dealers In Fire Arms, Ammunition and Fencing Goods. 



Du Pont Gun Powder 

SMOKELESS 

SHOT GUN and 

MILITARY POWDER 

Black Powder for Sporting and Blasting Purposes 

The Reputation of a Hundred Yeara is the Guarantee of 



DU PONT POWDER 



C.A UA1QHT, Agent, 



236 Market Street, San Francisco 




Also, as the official records show. 54 per cent of the ^ 
entire purse won with Parkers; 37.5 per cent of all the 
guns winning money were Parkers; and 34.6 per cent of all guns entered 
were Parkers, which proves that the Parker is unquestionably the most 
popular and "reliable" eun in the world. N Y< Salesroom: 33 Warren St. 



PARKER BROTHERS 



MERIDEN CONN. 



You can get 'hese Smokeless Powders in 



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SHELLS 



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EFF1E LOGAN i DAM Or SIR ALBERT S. 2:08 3 4). 

By Durfee 11265, dam Klpple by Prompter 23O0. B rand»m (Sra.e .da... of D.ed.llon 2:11. Creole »ttS .....I K.. K le 8:I9t-*) by Buccaneer 8806. 

Owned by B S Mi'Inkiinky, Honolulu, M I 



2 



[January 18, 190 



Harness Horse News From Los Angeles. 

Los Angeles, Cal., Jan. 11, 1902. 

Editor Breeder and Sportsman — Mr. Geo. A. 
Davis of Rancho Del Valle has added some stars to the 
light harness horses at our track. His stallion Rey 
Direct with four of his colts arrived here last Friday 
in charge of Ed Parker. 

Rey Direct is in the pink of condition and it will 
keep a horse export busy to find fault with him, either 
in a point of conformation, soundness or speed and as 
a producer of foals that have size, color, conformation, 
good bones, sound legs and the best of feet. For 
equine babies they can show as much speed as any 
ever foaled, age for age. Mr. Davis should be able to 
make a profitable season with his horse in Los Angeles. 

We have Neernut 2:1 2J, the groat son of Albert W., 
here and his performance speaks for itself. His colis 
that are being worked by Mr. Jonas are certainly 
good lookers and have plenty of speed. 

Walter Maben is training a largo stable of colts and 
aged ones. The star of Mr. Maben's colts is a beauti- 
ful sorrel by P. J. Williams' first class race horse 
Monterey 2:09}, and this colt does not belie his speedy 
trotting sire in either good looks or speed. Mr. Maben's 
great filly Italia is looking fit to race for a kingdom. 

Mr. Hodges is training some good prospects; the two 
colts by the king of racing stallions Directum 2:05} are 
certainly trotters. The black one shows the most 
speed and the best gait, but Hodges states that the 
bay will out trot him. Hodges is also training a full 
brother to the fast Dictatus gelding Funston that 
Sandy Smith took East last season. This one has not 
been asked to step any yet. Hodges is very sweet on 
him and looks for a fast pacer. It looks as though 
Dictatus will bocomo a valuable sire. 

Mr. Kent, who trained for M. M. Potter, looks lone- 
some with one Sweetheart to train and it is to bo hoped 
that he will soon have a lot of fast ones as he certainly 
gave the Potter Stables a good administration. 

Mr. Will Durfee of Dr. Book ard Charley Mack 
fame is the busy man. His stable is gaining both in 
quality and quantity and Mr. Durfeo will certainly 
keep his fellow kuights of the sulky guessing the 
coming season. Ho is an up to date, energetic man at, 
his business and should have success. He has several 
of the get of the great McKinney that look and act 
like real race horses. 

Mr. Ward is training McKenna, one of the best bred 
»nd best looking McKinney 8 ever foaled, and his rac. 
iag of last year stamped him as a reliable race horse. 
Mr. Ward has several good green ones in his stable 
and the star is a bay gelding by Neernut that can show 
speed enough to satisfy the most exacting horse man. 

Mr. Williams, formerly with Mr. Wilson, of Cvnthi- 
ana, Ky., is here and training several good ones. Coeur 
de Leon is his sta'r and a pretty fast pacer. Mr- 
Williams is preparing a few good ones for Dr. Le 
Moyne Wills. 

Robt. Hackney has several green ones that are worth 
watching. Mr. Hackney is a very energetic trainer 
and expects to turn out some Grand Circuit perform- 
ers this spring. 

Sam Washington is training a green pacing gelding 
by Advertiser. Sam has had him ninety days. He 
stepped him two miles in 2:18 each a few days ago and 
it looked easy. He is a big chestnut and wears noth- 
ing but his harness. He was bred at Palo Alto and 
was bought at a sale here. The star of Sam's stable is 
Stipulator by Titus, that Millard Sanders tried to buy. 
Sam is a painstaking trainer and has the reputation of 
being a first class speed maker. 

I. C. Mosier, tho veteran from Oregon, is here with 
his stallion Coeur d 'Alone, the horse that held the 
North Pacific record for trotting two year olds. The 
writer saw him trot and shut out the cream of Oregon 
and Washington. Mr. Mosier has put several of his 
get in the list at early age, which stamps Coeur d'Alene 
as a sire of early and extreme speed. Mr. Mosier has 
three two year olds by his horse here and they all 
show speed enough to satisfy most any critic. He 
also has Scappoose 2:144, pacing maro by Roy Wilkes 
2:06J. This mare through her sire inherits extreme 
speed and gameness. She is not only a good looker, 
but is ready right now to step a quarter in 30 seconds. 
Mr. Mosier is a newcomer. He is a reliable man and 
deserves success. 

Our driving club contemplates giving a first class 
matinee on Washington's Birthday. 

James Thompson, the trainer whose eloquence of 
tongue far outshines that of William Jennings Bryan, 
must intend locating in Los Angoles; he has shipped 
his outfit here in the writer's care. It is to be hoped 
that Mr. Thompson will get a good stable; in any case 
he can always make a success as a lecturer before the 
Board of Review at any place or on any occasion. He 
has hosts of friends here and they will all welcome his 
coming. 

Our track is now in fine condition and every horse 
man coming here can be sure of good stalls, good track 



and good treatment and the finest climate on earth. 

John Donnelly is training Billy Green, a green trotter, 
by McKinney out of an Echo mare. This big gelding 
is a very fast one, having already shown his ability to 
trot a mile in 2:22. Mr. Donnelly expects to make an 
M. & M. candidate of him and barring accidents his 
wiih will be fulfilled. He is owned by Mr. Bruener, 
who also owns Stanton Wilkes, one of the fastest un. 
soxed sons of that crack sire Nutwood Wilkes. Stan- 
ton Wilkes will be in the stud here this season; he 
should be kept busy. 

Horsemen here will be pleased to loarn that the 
California track managers intend to give good liberal 
purses the coming season. Good racing material is 
plentiful and it is to be hoped that our best ones can 
get a chance to earn good money without going East 
in 1902. Yours respectfully, 

C. A. Harrison. 

Neernut 2:12 1-4 at Los Angeles. 

During the month of February, owners of trotting 
bred mares in and around Los Angeles are to have the 
opportunity of breeding to that grand Individual, fast 
race horse and royally bred stallion Neernut 2:12}, 
owned by Mr. Geo. W. Ford of Santa Ana. It is in 
response to numerous earnest requests that Mr. Ford 
has consented to leavo the horse at Los Angeles during 
the rest of January and the entire month of February ) 
and after that time Noornut's time will be divided 
between Los Angeles and his Santa Ana home. 

When at the matinee of the Los Angeles Driving 
Club last Christmas day Mr. Ford mounted the sulky 
for the first time in three years and drove Neernut to 
victory in straight heats, defeating oasily three of the 
crack free for all trotters of Southern California, so 
many owners of well bred mares requested Mr. Ford 
to leave Neernut there until March 1st that he could 
not decline. Mr. P. D. Jones has charge of the horse 
and also five of his colts, taken out of pasture since 
Christmas — the whole lot good racing prospects and 
for sale so that work can be commenced on the now 
coming three year olds which have not yet been 
broken to harness. 

Neernut never served any outside mares until four 
years ago this coming season so that there are none of 
his get over three years old except tho few bred by Mr 
Ford. Not one of Neornut's coming three year olds 
owned by outside parties can bo bought for less than 
$500 and up to S1000, so that there is certainly a profit 
in breeding to him. 

Mr. Ford started in with five mares of short breeding 
and got five colts the same year — Neeretta 2:09J (sold 
to European parties and one of the biggest winners 
across the pond this year), Dido, public mile at a mat- 
nee in 2:17, half in 1:05; Neerbell, public mile in 2:16. 
The other two sold for road purposes and never saw a 
track. The next crop was four foals, Neeretta's dam 
having missed. Of the four Noerana worked in public 
at Joliet, Illinois, on the 31st of last July last three 
heats in 2:14, 2:14 and 2:13. Mr. Crump, her owner, 
writes that he is holding her for next summer's racing 
and when she starts there will be another 2:10 per- 
fo/mer for Neernut. Toughnut worked at Los Angeles 
last winter in 2:18 pacing and 2:23 trotting. Neerdel^ 
a full sister to Neerbell, paced a mile in 2:25, and 
Jimmy, a road horse sold to a Riverside party, has 
trotted a mile in 2:26. Toughnut and Neerdell are in 
Mr. Jones' charge now at tho Los Angeles track and 
with the three young ones ho has are going fast. It 
is a fact well known in Southern California that there 
has never been one of Neernut's get put on the track 
but showed lots of speed, and all prove fine road norses. 

The breeding of Neernut is hard to beat in any 
country. His sire is Albert W. 2:20, son of Electioneer, 
out of Sister by John Nelson. The dam of Neernut is 
Clytie II. by Nutwood and second dam by Whipple's 
Hambletonian. Electioneer has more descendants in 
the 2:10 list than any other horse, and Nutwood is the 
greatest producer of 2:30 performers and the greatest 
sire of dams of 2:30 performers. Whipple's Hamble- 
tonian was a great sire for his opportunities and sired 
the dam of the great Azote 2:04}. The Electioneer- 
Nutwood cross produced Arion2:07}, whose two year 
old record of 2:10} to high wheels has not been 
approached since the speed accelerating bike has come 
into use. Arion is the only 2:10 trotter that has pro- 
duced a 2:10 trotter, so that the combination of Elec- 
tioneer and Nutwood blood is proving to be remark- 
able in many directions. The Los Angelenos are in- 
deed fortunate to have a stallion like Neernut within 
reach and that they will appreciate the opportunity is 
certain. 

Purchase ono of the broodmares at the Sonoma 
Stock Farm's (estate of J. B. Chase) dispersal sale 
February 4th, breed her to a good stallion each year, 
give the foal plenty of feed and care and raise a stake 
winner. There are some groat producers to be sold. 
Read tho ad vertisement in this issue and send for a 
catalogue. 



A Famous Broodmare. 

Jessie Pepper, daughter of Mambrino Chief, has 
founded a family of her own that is second to none on 
the score of prepotenoy and extreme speed. She pro 
duced 

Iona 2:17* and Alpha2:23£, bothdamsof 2:20 trotters. 

Wenonah, dam of two standard performers and one 
producing son and grandam of Pistol 28,884, Lady 
Geraldine 2:11} (M. & M. winner), Wilask 2:11*, Alka - 
lone 2:14}, Aristocrat 2:25$, Governor B. 2:26}, Leonove 
2:28}, Ortolan 2:28i and Stanmore 2:29}. 

Gossip, dam of Don Wilkes 2:24| (a 2:12} sire), 
grandam of Baron Rogers 2:09} and third dam of 
Battlesign 2:13}. 

Metella, dam of Metallas 2:11. 

Startling 2:33}, dam of Greystone (a 2:08} sire) and 
grandam of Early Reaper 2:09}. 
Le Grande, a 2:18 sire. 
Iola, a great broodmare. 
Almont Archy, 2:30 sire. 
Omega, a 2:30 sire. 

Astrione, grandam of Clesintay 2:17}. 

Annabel, dam of Dolly Withers 2:29} and Almont 
Wilkes, a 2:15 sire, and grandam of eight standard 
performers, including Heir at Law, trotting record 
2:12, pacing record 2:05}, without hopples at either 
gait. Almont Wilkes is grandsire of Pat L. 2:09}. 

This is a great array of fast ones and producers to 
descend from one mare in three generations. Jessie 
Pepper is the great grandam of Mr. B. S. Krebe's 
young stallion Pistol, that is to make the season of 
1902 at San Jose. Her blood in any pedigree is price- 
less. Pistol is bred very much like Heir at Law on 
his dam's side, as the dams of both horses are by 
Alcantara out of daughters of Jessie Pepper. 



Eureka 2:15 1-4 as a Pole Horse. 

The laurels gained by Frank Bower*s celebrated 
trotting team, King Harry and John P. Stewart, dur- 
ing the past two seasons, has caused a split of rivalry 
amony Philadelphia and nearby horsemen. Several 
well.known drivers are out for Bower's scalp, so to 
speak, and among the latest to enter the difficult com 
petition of mating a pair that can step with the pony 
crackerjacks is Dr. H. W. Lobb, of Belmont Driving 
Club. Some time ago, on the advice of John Splan, 
Lobb purchased the chestnut gelding Eureka 2:15} by 
Ira, a son of Piedmont. Ira's dam was Irene, the 
dam of Stanford 2:26J by Mohawk Chief. Eureka's 
dam was a celebrated road mare by Nutwood. Eureka 
was brought from California by the late Tom Keating 
and considered a world beater and is ono of the hand- 
somest geldings in Philadelphia — 15 hands 3 inches 
high, a deep chestnut in color, with the coronet white. 
After considerable search for a mate to Eureka, Lobb 
through John E. Madden, has secured a perfect match 
in a seven year old mare, recently named Belladonna 
by Charles H. Page, secretary of the Turf Club. 
Belladonna is by Don Wilkes, son of Red Wilkes, dam 
by Pickett, a son of Aberdeen. Don Wilkes is by Red 
Wilkes, dam Princess by Mambrino Pet, a son of 
Mambrino Patchen. Belladonna has no record, but 
has shown a trial over the State Fair track at Trenton- 
N. J., in 2:20. The team is perfectly matched, go 
together well on the walk or trot and can speed a 2:20 
clip. They will be conditioned for next soason's 
matinees, and, with the good luck that should go with 
their names, the Doctor thinks he can beat any team 
in Philadelphia. — Trotter and Paver. 

Chicago's Great Stock Yards. 

Tho stupendous magnitude of tho business done at 
the Union Stock Yards, Chicago, is shown by last 
year's official reports, which gives for the twelve 
months a total of 16,200,000 head of live stock at cash 
sales amounting to $200,000,000. The l:orse market 
was established in 1866, and that year a total of 1553 
horses were received. An idea can be formed of how 
this branch of the business has grown, by the fact 
that on May 25th last, more horses were received on 
that one day than were received the entire first year. 
The total for 1901 for 109,390 horses and mules, the 
sales amounting to $13,128,000. The largest number 
for one day was 1697, and the largest number for one 
month 13,288 — the month of March. The outlook for 
the coming year is brighter and will no doubt break 
all previous records. 



Cresceus Earns More Than $70,000. 

Toledo, Ohio, Jan. 10. — George H. Ketcham, the 
owner and driver of Cresceus, announced today that 
during the year he received more than $70,000 in 
purses and as money for exhibitions given in various 
parts of the country by Cresceus. The horse was 
today taken to the Ketcham farm, where he will re- 
main during the winter. 



January 18, 1902] 



3 



The Abbot, Lord Derby and Boralma. 

Two match races were made in New York la9t Wed- 
nesday that will result in great races during the com- 
ing season. The matches were the outgrowth of the 
following banter made by Thos. W. Lawson of Boiton 
and published in the American Horse Breeder of that 
city January 7th: 

"If there is any one who has an idea at the present 
time he owns a horse the equal of Boralma, and thinks 
so strongly enough to make a match now for anything 
from $5000 to $20,000, best three in five, twenty-five 
per cent forfeit to be deposited now, twenty-five per 
cent June 1, and the balance the night before the rr.oe, 
Lord Derby, The Abbot or Cresceus preferred, let him 
speak up, and if his voice sounds pleasant, I think we 
can come to an interesting agreement; or Detter still, 
if the owners of Cresceus, Lord Derby and The Abbot 
will get together, I will race one at Hartford for $5000 
a side, one at Readville for the same amount, and the 
third one at Lexington for the same amount, and if 
the three combined can win a majority of the three 
races I to pay them $10,000; if not, they to pay me 
$10,000, one half of the gate receipts of each of the 
three races to go to local charities to be named by the 
winner or the track association." 

When this defi of Mr. Lawson's was published, Mr. 
Scannell, owner of The Abbot 2:0,"?}, and Mr. Smathers, 
owner of Lord Derby 2:06$, went to the office of the 
New York Journal and deposited $5000 each, and on 
Tuesday night of this week Mr. Lawson telegraphed 
two checks of $5000 each to bind the matches. As 
Mr. Ketcham has repeatedly announced that Cresceus 
is to be retired permanently to the stud at the end of 
his exhibition tour, and has already booked many 
mares to him, it is not likely that he will pay any 



Shorter Races and Shorter Distance. 

When the Biennial Congress of the National and 
American Trotting Associations meets next month at 
New York, an effort will be made to have the distance 
shortened in all races. President Ijams, of the Ameri- 
can Association, would like to see the distance shortened 
to 40 yards, but if it is made less than the present 80 
yards there will probably be a compromise on 70 in 
races whore less than eight horses start and 90 where 
eight or more are lined up. At the preliminary meet- 
ing of representatives of the two associations held in 
New York last, week there was considerable discussion 
as to this and other proposed reforms, and reported as 
follows in the New York Sun: 

Beyond a doubt associations will not hail with delight 
the shortening of the distance ground, and it was 
argued in the corridors that just as thoy did with the 
hopples associations in announcing their race condi- 
tions, they could reserve the right to go by the old 
rule. However, if the measure be adopted, it is hard 
to see just how meetings can be conducted with such 
violation in any one clause. With the hopples it was 
far different, the parent associations leaving it optional 
on the part of members as to whether hopples were or 
were not to be tolerated. It was significant, this gen- 
eral desire to see races shortened and the methods of 
the running turf somewhat adopted, and not a few 
who chatted on the subject expressed the opinion that 
from now on the races must end with the fifth heat. 

Few drivers took interest in this conference and so 
could not be interviewed. As a rule they favor the 



on a board where thoy can see it plain as can be. 

"Another thing. The shorter the races the better 
is the betting always you will find. You just get the 
horses together in a dash race, two in three or that 
Brighton Beach plan and I'll give 50 per cent more 
everywhere for their betting privileges. They can't 
get the races too short to suit the bettors. I know 
for I've watched it closely." 

Mary by Flaxtail. 

In volume 3 of the American Trotting Register, on 
pago 428, among the mares there registered is the 
following: 

Mary, b m fooled 1806, got by Flaxtail (pacer); dam 
by a horse called Bright Eyes. Bred by Geo. Lieu- 
rance. Mahaska county, Iowa; owned by M. W. Hicks, 
Keokuk, Iowa. 

Old Mary and her owner, Dr. Hicks, have both 
passed away, but the old mare's produce is brooding 
on and by their performances fulfilling all and more 
than all the predictions made for them by her owner. 

Of Mary's foals, but one, Apex 2:26, has a standard 
record, but in the second, third and fourth genera- 
tions the blood of old Mary is marching on. Mary 
herself had a record of 2:42 and a public trial of 2:25 

Bred to Promptor, she produced Apex that took a 
trotting record of 2:20 at Santa Rosa in 1880, when 
high wheel sulkies were in vogue. 

Bred to Egmont she produced Sterling 022.'!, that 
sired Acrobat 2:18}, Charivari 2:20}, Argent 2:24$, 
Rattle Bones 2:28 and the stallion Brilliant that pro- 
duced Brilliantine 2:17.',, a mare that has paced a half 





attention to the Lawson challenge. 

There will be a world of talk and speculation as to 
the result of the two races. Each horse has its friends 
and reasons will be offered in profusion why it should 
beat the other. Boralma has the hardest task to per- 
form, as he will be expected to beat both horses. On 
form The Abbot should be the favorite. He has a 
record more than three seconds faster than Lord 
Derby and 3} faster than Boralma. That he can trot 
a mile in 2:05 anytime when in perfect condition is 
pretty certain, while neither of the other two has 
demonstrated that he is that fast. Lord Derby trotted 
the last half of the mile in 1:02$ when making his rec- 
ord and is thought by some to be the coming cham- 
pion. He defeated Boralma handily last year. 

The breeding of these three geldings is noteworthy: 

The Abbot 2:03} is by Chimes, son of Electioneer and 
Beautiful Bells, out of Nettie King 2:20} by Mambrino 
King; second dam Nettie Murphy by Hamlin's Patchen. 

Lord Derby 2:06$ is by Mambrino King, son of Mam- 
brino Patchen and Belle Thornton by Edwin Forrest, 
out of Claribel by Almont Jr.; second dam Coraline by 
Almonarch. 

Boralma 2:07 is by Boreal, son of Bow Bells (brother 
to Chimes); his dam is Earalma by Earl, second dam 
Amal by Clay. 

Mr. J. B. Haggin now owns five thousand acres 
blue grass land in Kentucky and is ready uo buy more 
from adjoining owners whenever the price is right. 
He haB sixteen stallions and three hundred mares at 
Elmendorf. 



BORALMA 2:07. 

Brighton Beach plan, but do not believe in too vigor- 
ous measures to prevent laying up of heats. Nor do 
they favor a shorter distance flag. Mr. Ijams argues 
that it is a part of the trainer's vocation to so balance 
and educate his horses as to prevent those standstill 
breaks and consequent distancing. 

"I breed horses, have had a trainer for years, race 
my own horses at times, have acted many times as 
starting judge, and I tell you we must advance, not 
stand still and do things thus and so just because our 
predecessors were so inclined," he said. "Racing 
today is a great public amusement, and all should 
lend a hand to the end that our racegoing assemblages 
see actual contests — every heat scheduled for decision. " 

Andy Welch said: "I think I hit the right idea by 
fiving every heat winner in the Charter Oak $10,000 
stake $1,000 regardless of where ho finished in the 
other heats. Mako it an object to win extra money 
and the drivers aro alort to get there by the shortest 
route Records today count but little. It's no longer 
'wait till I got him just to an edge, then a killing,' for 
by the time they are ready to move what is the con- 
sequence? Why thoy start favorite always. 

"You can't cheat nowadays with a horse as you 
could a few yoars ago. No chance on earth to work 
and race horses 'under cover' like the old follows did 
years ago. No, sir. I believe in big stake racesi 
dashes above a mile and practically three moneys; 
then let the public make the odds on any proposed 
system following the plan of the old mutual system — 
each horse at 15 and the number of tickets sold posted 



in less than one minute. 

Sent to the court of Wayland Forrest Mary pro- 
duced Lettie, that is tho dam of the pacer Welcome 
2:10$ and the trotters Wayland W. 2:12$ and Maud 
Singleton 2:28$. Of theso Welcomo is tho siro of Iloilo 
2:29}, his first colt to start: Wayland W. is the siro of 
Arthur W. 2:11$ and John A. 2:12ij, while Maud Single- 
ton is the dam of Silver Ring 2:14$. 

Mary was bred to Buccaneer and produced Grace, 
that is the dam of Daodalion 2:11, Eagle 2:19$ and 
Creole 2:15, and Grace has a four and a fivo year old 
by Silver Bow that will take low records at the trot 
just as certain as thoy aro raced. Creolo is tho sire of 
Javelin 2:08}. 

To the cover of Promptor Grace produced Ripple, 
that bred to Durfoo produced Effio Logan, dam of the 
great raco horse Sir Albert S. 2:08j. 

Another foal of Mary's by Buccaneer was Gazelle, 
that was tho dam of Algonio and Algenie is the dam 
of Kolly Briggs 2:10}. 

Let us recapitulate: 

Mary by Flaxtail, dam of Apex 2:26. 

Sons produced 4 from 2:18} to 2:28. 

Grandson produced 1 in 2:17}. 

Daughters produced (i from 2:10$ to 2:19$. 

Sons of daughters produced 3 from 2:08} to 2:12:j. 

Granddaughters produced 3 from 2:08} to 2:14$. 

Great granddaughter produced 1 in 2:08iJ. 

This is quite a record for one mare. 



Striko! — if they don't give you Jackson's Nana Soda 



4 



[January 18, 1902 



Notes and News, j 

Begin right now. 



To advertise your stallion 



Breeding will begin next month. 

The Rochester, N. Y., amateur driving club has five 
hundred members. 

Two pacing sons of Onward have each sired a trotter 
that took a record better than 2:10. 



Board of Directors of Pacific Coast Trotting Horse 
Breeders' Association will meet next week. 



James Thompson has gone to Los Angeles with a 
string of horses to train over the track there. 



William Mac 2:051 established eleven track records 
and four State records during the season just closed. 



Secretary Sidney W. Giles claims the week beginning 
July 28th, for the Grand Circuit meeting at Cleveland. 



W. O. Bowers of Sacramento, claims the name 
Betsy Bee for a chestnut filly by Silver Bee 2:27ij out 
of Sadie Benton. 



Neva Simmons 2:11}, it is said, was fed and raised 
with a bottle, her dam going dry when the filly was 
but a month old. 

No books on harness races at the State Fair will 
meet the endorsement of all the harness horse owners 
in California without exception. 



Your weanling is now a yearling, your yearling a 
two year old and your two year old is three. This is 
all because a new year has arrived. 



Geo. W. Ford, the well known nurseryman of Santa 
Ana, has sold the Santa Ana race track which he pur- 
chased last year at a foreclosure sale. 



Rose Leyburn 2:15} by Onward is fifteen years old. 
She has six living foals and five of them have records 
of 2:30 or better. The sixth is a yearling. 



C. W. Williams' five stallions covered 330 mares in 
1901, an average of about seventy for each. The 
stallions will be taken to Kentucky again in 1902. 



At the next meeting of the Los Angelos Driving 
Club it is proposed to have half mile pacing and trot- 
ting races to saddle if it is possible to secure sufficient 
entries. 

The fastest pair of horses driven by any person as a 
team is owned by C. T. Chapin of Rochester, New 
York. They are the pacers Connor 2:03J and Dariel 
2:05i. 

W. P. Ijams of Terre Haute has secured the ser- 
vices of Joe Bruce as trainer, and he now has at the 
famous four-cornered track sixteen head of two and 
three year olds by Axtell. 



The National Educator says that the best drivers 
talk to their animals, and the journal might truthfully 
have added that many of the poorest drivers talk to 
the owners and do lots of it. 



One of the early foals of the year made its appear- 
ance at Geo. W. Ford's farm at Santa Ana on January 
4th. It is a handsome filly by Neernut 2:12} out of 
Alcola by Mambrino Wilkes. 



Online 2:04 pacing and Directum 2:05} trotting, are 
now occupying adjoining stalls on tho International 
Stock Farm in Minnesota. They hold the four year 
old record at their respective gaits. 



The Stallion Stake inaugurated by the California 
State Agricultural Society should be one of the largest 
stakes for trotting and pacing three year olds in 
America. It will be if owners will nominate their 
stallions. 



The census of the eastern and middle states shows a 
great falling off in the number of young horses. In 
Maine for instance in 1891 there were 27,370 horses 
three years old or younger, while in 1901 there were 
but 8,670. 



Thos. M. Lawson says over his own signature that it 
is true that he offered the Hamlins $25,000 for Dare 
Devil, which offer was refused, and adds that he stands 
ready right now to pay $30,000 for the son of Mam- 
brino King and Mercedes by Chimes. 



G. W. Baum of Pittsburg has consigned the trotting 
mare Neva Simmons 2:11} by Simmons, dam Neva, to 
the Woodard & Shanklin sale, at Lexington, Ky., in 
February. The mare has been one of the biggest 
money winners on the Grand Circuit. 



Peter Duryear, who secured Shadow Chimes 2:06ij 
at the Madison Square Garden sale with a bid of $5100, 
says: "I intended to send the horse to Mr. West, of 
Edinburg, Scotland, but John J. Scannell, fire com- 
missioner of New York, and owner of The Abbot 2:03}, 
wanted the great pacer so much that I let him have 
him. Shadow Chimes will remain in Geer's stable, 
but the reinsman does not own a cent in him." 



Third payment of $10 each has been made on 166 
foals named for the First Pacific Breeders Futurity, 
that has a guaranteed value of $0000. This stake is 
for foals of 1901. 



Second payment was made on 231 of the original 
299 mares named in the Second Pacific Breeders 
Futurity for tho foals of mares bred in 1901. This is a 
great showing and gives promise that the stake may 
exceed the $0000 guaranteed. 



A daughter of Buccaneer will be offered at the sale 
of horses from the Sonoma Stock Farm at the old 
Killip & Co. salesyard, corner Market and Van Ness 
avenue, February 4th. Buccaneer sired Grace, the 
dam of Daedalion 2:11 and Creole 2:15. 



Brown Bess, a mare by Antevolo out of Black Bess 
by Venture, is among tho broodmares to be sold at the 
closing out of the stock belonging to the estate of J. 
B. Chase, deceased, which will take place at the sale- 
yard, 1732 Market street, in this city, February 4th. 



Freddie C. 2:14}, the little pony by Direct that was 
only a short neck behind Sir Albert S. in 2:11} at the 
Breeders' meeting last August in Sacramento, is being 
wintered at Seattle. The little fellow is looking better 
than ever and will make things warm in the 2:15 classes 
this year whenever and wherever he starts. 



The California bred broodmare Lady Maekay by 
Silverthreads 18053, son of The Moor, adds another 
performer to her list in the trotter March hurst Belle 
2:23}. Lady Mackay is now the dam of four in the 
list, including the stallion Oakland Baron 2:094/, two 
speed -siring sons and one speed-producing daughter. 



There is a five year old brown gelding by Secretary, 
out of Brown Bass by Antevolo 2:19}, second dam by 
Venture in the Sonoma Stock Farm's dispersal sale 
that should be snapped up quickly when put up for 
bids. It is not only a fine individual but has every 
prospect of being a fast trotter and valuable roadster. 



The usual crop of 2:10 trotters and 2:05 pacers is 
growing fast under the genial warmth of the hot air 
meetings that are being held wherever two or more 
horse owners are gathered together, but the honing 
they get on the Jaw Bone Circuit will put the majority 
of them out of business beforo the training season is 
fairly under way. 

There are eight pacers that have paced in 2:02 or 
better, as follows: Star Pointer 1:59}, John R. Gentry 
2:00i, Prinse Alert 2:00A, Joe Patchen 2:01}, Little 
Bey 2:0H, Robert J. 2:0H, Anaconda 2:01 ^ and Coney 
2:02. How many men now alive expected during the 
day of the high wheel sulky to see or read of such an 
array of extremely fast sidewheelers. 

Gazelle 2f:llA by Gossiper 2:1 4!{ seems destined to be 
a great broodmare. At nine years of age she is tho 
dam of Zolock 2:10A. Zephyr, a 2:10 trotting prospect, 
owned by M. J. C MeKinuey, of Titusville, Pa., for 
which he paid $9000 last spring; also a two year old, 
trial oighth in 10 seconds, sired by Titus, anil another 
good pro-pect. Gazelle is uow in foal to Council 
Chimes 2:07i and will probably never be raced again. 



William C. Trimble, a veteran horseman and tho 
patriarch of the American trotting turf, died at New- 
burg, New York, on the 7th inst , aged seventy-six 
years. He trained and developed Mountain Hoy in 
1865 and gave Cobwebs, the speedway champion, his 
record in 1894. He spent fifty years with trotters and 
was known among horsemen all over the country. 
His last appearance as a driver was on the Newburg 
track last fall. 



Mr. Hugh F. R. Vail of Santa Barbara, has arranged 
to send his mare Veronica 2:29, dam of his stallion 
Neil W., to be bred to Iran Alto 2:12} this year. 
Veronica has been bred to the Santa Rosa Stock 
Farm's stallion, Almonition, for the past threo years 
and has two fine fillies by that horse. Veronica is an 
inbred Almont, being by Alcona 730, son of Almont, 
out of Fontana the dam of Silas Skinner 2:17, and two 
others, by Almont. 



Keepsake, dam of Tommy Britton 2:06J, has but six 
living foals, and four have records: Katie Britton 
2:25, foaled 1891, by Egotist 2:22*; Tommy Britton 
2:06$, foaled 1893, by Liberty Bell 2:24; J R. Slaughter 
2:26<, foaled 1895, by Liberty Bell, and Rose Warren 
2:23}, foaled 1896, by Alta Vista. Keepsake is now 
owned by William Simpson, of Empire City Stud, and 
her other two foals are Keeps (1898) by Prince of India 
2:13} and a filly (1901) by Stately 2:11}, pacing, son of 
Hummer. 



The American and National trotting rules will be 
amended at the Biennial Congress to be held in New 
York on the 12th of next month so as to prohibit any 
heat in a race being called aftor sunset. This will 
entirely remove the trouble that has occurred every 
year under the old rule which prohibits horses being 
started when it is too dark for the judges to distin- 
guish their gait. Some wonderful cases of owl eyed 
judges have been developed under this rule, especially 
on the last day of a meeting. 



Santa Rosa Stock Farm came very near losing a 
valuable filly the other day with lung fever, the same 
disease that carried off Janice 2:08',. This filly is a 
four year old by Sidney Dillon out of Lou Milton, dam 
of Redwood 2:21] and Ethel Mack 2:25, ana was one 
of the most promising candidates for last year's Occi 
dent Stake, but was taken with distemper and did not 
start. She had shown quarters in 33 seconds and it 
would probably have taken heats in 2:15 or thereabouts 
to de r eat her. When attacked with lung fever last 
week, the experience with Janice came in play ana" the 
filly was taken in hand immediately and is now all 
right again. 



Ten years and more ago the pen name of Father A. 
T. Hendrick— 'Aurolius"— wasoneof themost familiar 
on the list of contributors to the turf press, while his 
contributions were also among the ablest of that era. 
Of lato he has dropped out of the field— which is a 
matter of general regret— but his pen is busy in others 
which pertain to his life work. Father Hendrick is 
now tho rector of St. Bridget's Catholic Church of 
Rochester, N. Y., and is one of the most active and 
respected clergymen in the Empire State. 



The record for the Russian Orloff trotter is now 
2:14} and with American training methods and Amer- 
ican drivers it looks as if the time is not far distant 
when tho Russian breed will compete with the Ameri- 
can. It is well to note, however, that Goldsmith Maid 
made her champion record of 2:14 on September 2, 
1874, and it has taken the American breeder twenty- 
five years to get from 2:14 to 2:02], and with a start of'a 
quarter of a century the Russian trotter is not liable 
to catch up in tho next generation.— Spirit of the Times. 



ihe Ann Arbor Driving Club, its officers and mem- 
bers stand suspended for failure to pay the $300 free- 
for-all purse last fall. The suspension is tho result of 
a protost against the club's action filed by the winner, 
Mr. Goldberg of Detroit, who is the owner of Satin 
Slippers. The maro won the race in the time sur- 
rounding 2:27, although the racer has a mark of 2:09. 
The driving club considered it a put-up race in the 
stables and refused to let the ghost walk. It has not 
yet been determined what will be done with the record 
on tho black list. 



It is learned that Thomas W. Lawson, who is estab- 
lishing a breeding farm at Scituate, Miss., has asked 
the Hamlins for a price on Dare Devil 2:09 by Mam- 
brino King. However, the Village Farm people have 
advised Mr. Lawson that no money would buy the 
black stallion, declining to sell at any price. Dare 
Devil is nine years old and a fine individual. He has 
won seven first prizes and three championships at tho 
national horse show, New York, and will some day bo 
at the head of the Village Farm stud. He already has 
many fino sons and daughters at the farm. 



A. E. Perron has been paying a visit to his old 
friends in Buffalo, and in an interview said in part: 
"The time is past when a man can say of a tt otter or 
pacer that he has outlived his usefulness on the track 
and can be retired to the speedway. The speedway of 
to-day demands tho best there is. There are no finer 
harness horses in tho world than those seen on the 
New York speedway. Yes, an afternoon on the New 
York speedway nowadays is a treat and an education 
to the lover of the horse. Splendid animals are out. 
They must not alone possess speed, but must be fine 
actors, and possess distinct character." 



Mr. A. H. Miller of Buffalo, New York, who has 
purchased quite a number of California horses during 
the past few years, among others Gazelle 2:11 J, Agitato 
2:09 and Mamie Griffin 2:12. will consign nearly all his 
horses to the Fasig-Tipton Now York s.de this month 
He says: "I am not going out of the business entirely, 
but only want, a couple of high class campaigners— a 
trotter and a pacer. When the campaign opens again 
I may decide to purchase a campaigner if I run across 
the right kind — a sensational performer well staked. 
I prefer paying several thousand dollars more for a 
horse all ready for the races in June or July than to 
run the chances of knocking out a good prospect now 
in training." Mr. Miller is the gentleman who wanted 
Zolook 2:UU and Anzella 2:10] and offored $10,000 and 
$3500 for them respectively. 

"Andy" McDowell, who drove Alix, Azote, Directly 
as a two year old to his record of 2:07j, and Georgena 
to her record, when a cripple, of 2:07}, has several 
really good horses in prepartion for his 1902 campaign. 
He will again race little Martha Marshall 2:07ij, the 
only pacer that ever took a heat from Dan Patch 2:04}, 
Aggie Medium 2:12}, MajorGreer 2:14, Betsy Tell 2:29}, 
that has been second in races in 2:14, and a few others 
belonging to William Kelly, the wealthy Brooklyn 
contractor who formerly owned Dan Cupid 2:09}, and 
on pleasant days drives them regularly on the speed- 
way. "Andy" McDowell is probably the best "catch" 
driver to-day before the public and can get more out 
of a tired horse than any of our leading traiuers. He 
has the satisfaction of knowing that few ever loft him 
to lower the records he gave them, which shows just 
how great a reinsman and conditioner he is. Since 
giving up Monroe Salisbury's horses he has lived East, 
and as he likes New York he will probably be a momber 
of our local contingent for several seasons to come. — 
A*. 1'. ,S'ioi. 



The Sacramento Hecord- Union says: "Mayor George 
H. Clark has a new pacer called Fred Ames, purchased 
for him in New York by Vet Tryon at the Fasig sale 
held there a few weeks ago. Fred Ames is a hand- 
some bay gelding, weighing a little less than 1,000 
pounds, and is by Bayard Wilkes, a son of George 
Wilkes. Last summer at Readville, Mass., to a wagon 
at a driving club matinee he was second by a length 
to a horse which took the heat in 2:09}. From this it 
appears that on the Riverside road this summer and 
at the matinees of the local driving club the steed that 
passes the Mayor's llyer will have to be speedy. It is 
the opinion of some of the horsemen that Joe Terry's 
Margaretta will give the new pacor as hot a brush as 
any hereabouts." Fred Ames is nine years old, and 
has a race record of 2:20 j made on a half mile track in 
1900. In 1901, he was used by Geo. F. Leonard of Bos- 
ton, as a matinee horse and pulled a wagon in 2:15A. 
Best of all, this horse can be driven by anyone, on the 
road or in races as ho is clean gaited and level headed, 
needs no straps or boots, and can be rated at any part 
of the mile. 



On a hot day drink Jackson's Napa Soda lemonade 
and be refreshed. 



January 18. 1902) 



STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE. 

Prospective Change in Betting System— New 
Stallion Stake for Trotting and 
Pacing Colts. 

The State Board of Agricultural Directors held a 
meeting- last Saturday afternoon, with the following 
members present: A. B. Spreckels, J. E. Terry, John 
Mackey, C. W. Paine, Benjamin Rush, Park Henshaw, 
Grove L. Johnson and Frank Covey. 

The meeting was called for the special purpose of 
making arrangements to turn over Agricultural Park 
to the possession of the State of California, in accord- 
ance with the provisions of an Act of the last Legisla- 
ture, which appropriated $45,000 to pay the debt of 
the Agricultural Society. As it was considered best 
to obtain a clear legal knowledge of the method of 
transfer, a committee was appointed consisting of 
Directors Johnson, Henshaw and Mackey, who were 
empowered to obtain the legal information and report 
to the board at its next meeting on February 8th. 

The betting question at State Fairs was taken under 
discussion, aud the secretary was instructed to get the 
opinion of horsemen from all over the State as to the 
ad visability of selling auction pools and Paris mutuels 
on all harness events, and bookmaking on all running 
events. 

As many of the horse owners of the State had mis- 
understood the provisions of the Stallion Stake, for 
the get of stallions entered January 1, 1901, the date 
of entries was extended to March 1, 1901, in order to 
give them a chance to enter their colts. 

A new departure was made in racing circles by the 
formulating of a new stallion stake for harness events. 
Following is the announcement: 

For the get of stallions that made private or public 
service, season of 1901, for their foals of 1902. The 
race to be contested at the State Fair at Sacramento, 
1905. 

Entrance fee for stallions to be the price that they 
made public service during the season of 1901. All 
other stallions that did not make public service, en- 
trance fee to be $20. Stallions to be named February 
1, 1902. 

All foals that are the get of any stallion entered in 
this stake to be oligible to be entered on July 15, 1903. 
Entrance fee $50 each, of which $5 must accompany 
the entry, and a further payment of $10 March 1, 1904, 
and a further payment of $15 each May 1, 1905. Al 1 
starters to be named on the 1st day of August, 1905, 
when the final payment of $20 shall be made, and all 
colts making this final payment shall be eligible to 
start. The State Agricultural Society to add an 
amount equal to all moneys paid in by the nominators 
of the stallions, not to exceed $1000. 

Entrance money paid in for stallions and added 
moneys shall be divided GO per cent, to the end for 
trotting colts, and 40 per cent, to the end for pacing 
colts. No nominator allowed to start more than one 
colt at e'ther end. 

The nominator of any colts shall on May 1, 1904, 
then declare as to the trotting or pacing end he desires 
to start his colts. All moneys paid in on colts 
transferred to the pacing division shall be segregated 
and placed to the credit of the pacing stake and all 
other payments shall be placed to the credit of the 
trotting stake. 

All payments not made as they become due declares 
entry out and releases subscriber from further liability. 
Hopples barred in both classes. Mile heats, three in 
five. 

Nominator of the sires of tho winning colts in each 
end to receive $250, balance of tho stakes and added 
money to be divided 50, 25, 15 and 10 per cent. Right 
reserved to declare two starters a walkover for stakes 
paid in only. 

When only two start they may contest for the en- 
trance money paid in, to be divided 66 jj percent to the 
winner and 33$ per cent to the second horse. A horse 
distancing the fielJ in either class shail be entitled to 
all moneys paid in, and 25 per cent only of thejmoney 
added by the society. 

Open to all stallions that have made private or pub- 
lic service in any of the following States: California, 
Oregon, Washington, Montana, Idaho, Colorado, 
Wyoming, Utah, Nevada and Arizona during the sea- 
son of 1901. 

No entry will be accepted except under this con- 
dition: That all disputes that may ariso in rogard to 
the conditions of this race shall be settled by the Board 
of Directors of the State Agricultural Society, or those 
whom they may appoint, and the decision shall be 
final. — Sacramento Record- Union. 



To the usual statement "not afraid of steam, cable 
or electric cars" which is used in advertising horses 
for sale for city purposes, must now be added "or 
automobiles." 

Sober up on Jackson's Napa Soda. 



Getting Lively at the Horse Centre. 

Although tho weather has been anything but favor- 
able in this section of California for tho past month, 
frosty mornings and no rain making farmers and horse 
breeders rather anxious, scarcely a day passes that 
does not see a few additional stalls at the famous Pleas- 
anton training track filled with newcomers. 

The largest string stabled here is from the Santa 
Rosa Stock Farm and in charge of that able speed in- 
structor, Millard Sanders. With Dolly Dillon 2:07 and 
Bonsilene 2:14] to act as demonstrators, and a class of 
a dozen youngsters of more or less enthusiasm and 
promise, Mr. Sanders is kept very busy and when tho 
warm weather of spring comes ho will bo riding some 
fast quarters and halves. 

Geo. A. Kelly is not doing much at present aside 
from making a number of improvements in the pretty 
little home he recently purchased here, and keeping 
Anzella 2:10', and one or two more in good shape. 
Mr. Kelly declined $3500 for Anzella twice lately and 
will race her through the Grand Circuit unless he gets 
the price bethinks th6 mare is worth. Every good 
judge of a trotting horse who has seen Anzella race 
will tell you that she is worth more money than Mr. 
Kelly asks for her. 

Bert Webster is handling a lot of youngsters for 
Chas. Griffith in his quiet but effective way. I notice 
that Bert always has his charges in good shape, that 
he is careful and painstaking and can teach the speed 
lessons as well as any of them. Mr. Griffith has taken 
up his residence here and is driving Bonnie Direct 2:05] 
much himself. It makes no difference who drives 
Bonnie they all "rubber" when the handsome stallion 
goes by. 

J. M. Alviso is taking good care of Rey del Diablo 
2:23 and getting ready to begin work on some extra 
good prospects belonging to Lou Crellin. There is a 
Searchlight or two to break, I believe, though not old 
enough to train for the races. 

Mr. Geo. A. Davis of Rancho del Valle sent his 
handsome stallion Rey Direct 2:10 and four of his 
coming two year olds to Los Angeles last week. Rey 
Direct will make the season of 1902 down there and 
the four two year olds were, taken along to show what 
sort Rey Direct produces. Mr. Parker also took the 
old pacer Col. Benton 2:14J by Brown Jug with him. 

Sam Gamble has three three year olds at the track. 
The black stud colt by Axtell will be a handsome horse 
and as he is bred in the purple ought to be a sire of 
speed. Some one asked Sam the other day if he was 
training him for the races and he answered, "Not yet; 
I am training him for a stallion at present." The filly 
by Kremlin 2:07 j acts like a rare good one. 

Ed Lafferty went down to the city last week and 
came back with a mare that looks like one of those 
good things that is not picked up every day. She is 
by Chas. Derby out of an Anteeo mare and was bred 
up at Oakwood Park. I believe Mr. Umbsen, the 
popular real estate dealer of San Francisco, is her 
owner. Lafferty has four or five others that he is 
getting in shape — among them two full brothers by 
Silver Bow 2:16 out of Grace, the dam of Daedalion 
2:11 Creole 2:15 and Eagle 2:19$. The five year old is 
a peachorino and the four year old is very much like 
him. 

Worth Ober has quite a number of horses belonging 
to the Sharon estate that he is working the long hair 
off from and teaching not to snort every time they are 
looked at. Worth is one of the best horte educators 
in tho country, however, and it will not be long until 
he has thom all looking at locomotives as if they were 
old friends and acting as if those pesky automobiles 
were something good to oat. 

Mr. Juan Gallegos has a string of good looking and 
well bred young horses here that were bred by him on 
'his beautiful farm at Mission San Jose. They are in 
charge of his son, who is a polite and attentive young 
gentleman who takes great interest in all the horses in 
his care. A Diablo colt is very promising and a hand, 
some horse, while a blocky built filly by Direct is show- 
ing lots of speed. 

Several trainers have applied for stalls on February 
1st, and William Sutherland, who is superintending 
the track and keeping it in good condition, is willing 
to bet a good box of cigars against one of Alvi&o's 
cigarettes, that if there are two or three weeks of rain 
in February there will bo two or three hundred horsos 
at tho track in March. As Jim seldom bets unless he 
has a pretty good thing, just keep your eye on Pleas- 
anton after the rainy season. Ima Railbird. 



There are now eight sires credited with having sired 
100 or more standard performers as follows: Nutwood 
2:18, with 165; Eltctioneer, with 160; Onward 2:25], 
with 158; Red Wilkes, with 158; Alcantara 2:23, with 
149; Simmons 2:28, wiMi 106; Wilton 2:19], with 102, 
and Gambetta Wilkes 2:19], with 101. Tho three last 
named wore added to this exclusive list this year. Of 
those sires, Onward, Red Wilkes, Alcantara, Wilton 
and Gambetta Wilkes are still living. 



Hart Boswell Goes to Pleasanton. 

Mr. Geo. A. Davis, of Pleasanton, than whom theie 
is no moro intelligent and enthusisastic lover and 
breeder of trotting horses, has made arrangements by 
which he has secured from owner K. O'Grady, of San 
Mateo, the stallion Hart Boswell and will take him to 
Pleasanton for the season of 1902. 

Hart Boswell has been of late years one of tho "over- 
looked" stallions of California. Bred in linos that are 
of the very richest purple, an individual of rare merit, 
he has not received the patronage he deserved, and 
none of his colts have been trained, although *.hey are 
fine lookers and have plenty of natural speed. 

Recognizing the fact that Onward is the greatest 
living son of Georgo Wilkes, and that his well bred 
sons will be much sought after this year by intelligent 
breeders, Mr. Davis has secured Hart Boswell, son of 
Onward and the great maro Nancy Lee by Dictator, 
that gave to the world tho wonderful Nancy Hanks 
2:04, queen of her day, and already the dam of a won- 
derful colt trotter. 

Hart Boswell is now twelve years old, and was bred 
by Hart Boswell, of Kentucky (for whom ho was 
named), and purchased by Samuel Gamble for the 
Hobart Stock Farm, which, unfortunately for tho 
breeding interests of California, was disbanded upon 
the death of its founder. Onward, sire of Hart Bos- 
well, is now the sire of 158 in the standard list, of which 
26 have records of 2:15 or better and nine are in the 
2:10 list, more of the extreme speed performers than 
are to the credit of any other sire. Onward is looked 
upon by a very large number of horsemen as the best 
son of George Wilkes, and when it is recollected that 
his dam is the great broodmare Dolly, that also gave 
to the world the mighty Director 2:17, sire of Directum 
2:05} and Direct 2:05$, and founder of a wonderful 
family, and that she also produced Thorndale 2:22], 
John F. Payne and Pretender, all producing sires, as 
well as four standard performers and the dams of sev- 
eral fast ones, it is not surprising that the claim is 
made. Onward leads all living sires in the number of 
2:30 performers, in the number of 2:20 performers and 
all sires, living or dead, in the number of 2:10 perform- 
ers. On the Eastern Grand Circuit the get of Onward 
made a wonderful showing this year and led the 
produce of any other stallion in the amount of money 
won. When race horses are up for discussion, the 
kind that have gone out and won money in contests, 
the names of the trotters Beuzette 2:06], Onward Silver 
2:08, Pilatus 2:09], Cornelia Belle 2:10, Cut Glass 2:10], 
and the pacers Pearl Onward 2:06$, Gazette 2:07], Col- 
bert 2:07$, Col. Thornton 2:09$, Major Mason 2:09] 
come to mind, and they are all sons and daughters of 
Onward. 

The dam of Hart Boswell ranks high among tho 
broodmares as his sire does among the stallions. Nancy 
Lee was sired by the great Dictator, sire among many 
others of the champion Jay Eye See 2:06}, whose name 
was once a household word, and whose daughters 
have produced Lock heart 2:08$, Gazette 2:07}, Rex 
Americus 2:11], Princess Eulalie 2:09] and more than 
a dozen in the 2:15 list. Nancy Lee was herself the 
greatest daughter of Dictator as she produced Nancy 
Hanks 2:04, and Nancy Stam 2:30, and her son Dicta- 
tor Wilkes is the sire of Dick Turpin 2:09$ and seven 
more with standard records. Nancy Lee's dam was 
Sophy, a daughter of Edwin Forrest 49, and the 
grandam of Mike Wilkes 2:16$. Sophy's dam was by 
Parker's Brown Pilot, a son of Copperbottom, her 
grandam a thoroughbred mare by Bertrand out of a 
mare by Lance. 

Here is the very choicest of breeding — high class 
producing trotting blood, backed by the very best of 
thoroughbred, and it is to be found on both sides of 
Hart Boswell's pedigree. 

The most successful and scientific thoroughbred 
breeders have a rule which says that the best results 
are obtained by "returning to a stallion the best strains 
of his dam." This is the Bruce Lowe theory, which 
is finding so many followers in England, Australia and 
the United States. Now the best strain in tho dam of 
Hart Boswell is from her sire Dictator, as the latter 
produced Director, sire of Directum and Direct, the 
latter the sire of Directly 2:03], Bonnie Direct 2:05] 
and Rey Direct 2:10. In and around Pleasanton there 
are many daughters of Director, Direct and Directum 
and some young fillies by Bonnie Direct and Rey 
Direct. By breeding these mares to Hart Boswell, 
breeders will be following tho thoroughbred rule of 
"returning to the sire the best strains of his dam," 
and it should produce great results. We understand 
Hart Boswell's service foe will be $30. 

In speaking of the Dallas, Texas, track, Mr. Ketcham 
said after driving Cresceus over it in 2:07] : "There 
are only five trotting tracks in the world that are bet- 
ter, namely, Detroit, Cleveland, Columbus, Providence 
and Memphis. The last named — the best in the 
world — is the only one pronouncedly Its superior. 
Dallas is close up in the class with the others." 



6 



[January 18, i»«2 



THE WE.KLY 

BREEDER, AND SPORTSMAN 

F. W. KELLEY, PROPRIETOR. 



rurf and Sporting Authority of the Pacific Coast. 

— OFFICE — 

36 GEARY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

P. O BOX 2300. 



Term*— Oue Tear S3, Six Months SI. 75. Three Months SI 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Money should be sent by postal order, draft or by registered letter 
addressed to F. W. Kei.i.ey, 36 Geary St., San Francisco. Cal. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's name and 
uddress, not necessarily for publication, but as a private guarantee 
of good faith. 

O. O. I l Kid & CO., Agents. Subscription and advertising. 

Salisbury Building, Melbourne, Australia 



San Francisco, Saturday, January 18, 1902. 



Stallions Advertised. 



TROTTING BRED. 

BONNIE DIRECT 2:05'4 C. L. Griffiths Pleasanton 

REY DIRECT 2:10 Los Angeles. Geo. A. Davis, Pleasanton 

WILKES DIRECT 2:22'/, T. W. Barstow, San Jose 

McKINNEY 2:11M C. A. Durfee, San Jose 

NEIL W H. F. R Vail, Santa Barbara 

SIDNEY' DILLON Frank Turner, Santa Rosa 

THOROUGH 1IREDS 

OSSARY James McDonnell, Portola, San Mateo Co. 

ST. CARLO James McDonnell, Portola, San Mateo Co 

HACKNEYS. 

GREEN'S RUFUS The Bay wood Stud, San Mateo 



THE NEW STAKE for the get of harness stallions 
which has been inaugurated by the California 
State Agricultural Society, the official announcement 
of which will be found in the advertising columns of 
this journal, should meet the approval and receive the 
support and endorsement of every stallion owner on 
the Pacific Coast. There are wonderful possibilities in 
this stake and if the breeders of trotters and pacers 
give it one-half the patronage it deserves it will be the 
largest stake ever contested for in America. The 
stake is for the get of stallions that may be nominated, 
the nomination fee for these stallions to be the amount 
of their fee in 1901 where they stood for public service; 
private stallions to pay $20 each nomination fee. In 
the columns of the Holiday edition of the Breeder 
and Sportsman thoro were 45 stallicns advertised 
whose service fees ranged from $20 to $100 each, the 
total being $1650. Should all of these stallions be 
entered (and they do not comprise one-tenth of the 
standard bred horses that will be in the stud on the 
Pacific Coast during 1902) the stake wouldjhave $2650 
in it before a foal was entered, as the State Agricul- 
tural Society will add $1000 in such case. The stake 
is open to the get of all stallions that were in service 
in California, Oregon, Washington, Montana, Idaho, 
Colorado, Wyoming, Utah, Nevada and Arizona during 
1901, and if 100 stallions are named in it there should 
be nearly a thousand foals on which'first payment of 
$5 is made June 1, 1903, when the foals are one year 
old, and as the entire entrance fee on the foals is but 
$50 including a starting fee of $20, it will be the least 
expensive stake ever devised. The very least amount 
that can be exp.ected in this stake is $5000 and $50 is 
but one per cent of the stake. If the stake reaches 
$10,000 (and it should far exceed that amount) the 
entire entrance fee would be but one-halt of one p9r 
cent, something unheard of in the history of trotting 
and pacing or any other stakes. The stake is to be 
contested in 1905, when the colts entered are three years 
old and will be in two divisions, 60 per cent going to 
trotters and 40 per cent to the pacers, while the owners 
of stallions that sire the winners are to get $250 each. 
We do not know of a stake where the payments are so 
easy. The first, of $5 is not du > until the colt is a year 
old. There is a payment of $10 due March 1st of the 
following year, and one of $15 May 1st of the year of 
the race. These are all the payments except a final 
one of $20 on August 1st, about one month prior to the 
race. Payments not made as they become due 
declares the entry out and releases subscriber from 
further liability. Look over tho advertisement care- 
fully and it will be found that the State Agricultural 
Societv has devised a stake that is bound to be one of 
the most popular ever inaugurated and we believe 
that eastern associations will be adopting the plan be- 
fore the year is out. Nearly all futurities require the 
mare to be nominated before foaling. This stake calls 
for stallions to be named and not a cent has to be paid 
on the foal until it is a yearling, so that the breeder 
has an idea whether he has a colt worth entering or 
not. All hail to the new stake and thanks are due 
the Board of Directors of the State association for 
their interest in the welfare of horse owners and 
breeders. May there be a majority of the stallions in 
the States and Territories comprising the district, 
nominated, and may the foals entered run up into the 
thousands. The stake is worthy of it. 



A GOOD WORK has been started by the Directors; 
of the California State Agricultural Society by 
which it is proposod to abolish bookmaking on harness 
racing at the State Pair this year. At the meeting of 
the Board held last week Director F. W. Covey pre- 
sented a resolution which directed the Secretary, Geo. 
W. Jackson, to communicate with all horsemen inter- 
ested in harness racing and secure their individual 
views in regard to the matter, so that action may be 
taken at the next meeting of tho Board on February 
8th. Mr. Covey made a very earnest and able address 
on presenting the resolution setting forth the evils of 
the present bookmaking system on harness events, 
and it is very probable that the Roard will confine all 
Oetting on trotting and pacing races to auction pools 
and mutuels this year, permitting bookmaking only on 
the running events. Every person interested in har- 
ness racing or the breeding of harness horses should 
endorse this new departure and give the members of 
the Board hearty support in their action. If the State 
Agricultural Society will lead, every district association 
will follow, and the trotting turf of California will be 
relieved of an evil that has well nigh ruined it. Let 
no harness horse breeder or owner fail to write Secre- 
tary Jackson forthwith on the subject. The State 
Board of Agriculture desires an expression of opinion, 
and are entitled to one before acting in the matter. 



A -BIENNIAL MEETING or congress of members of 
the National and American Trotting Associations 
will be held at the Murray Hill Hotel, New York, on 
Wednesday, February 12th. At this congress many 
changes will be made in the rules of these two associa- 
tions, the majority of which will be unimportant. 
Several very important changes will be effected how- 
ever, one of which will be the one pertaining to bars 
and records. The new rule will probably read as 
follows: 

"Records cannot be made or bars incurred in trials 
of speed where there is no poolselling, bookmaking or 
other public betting on the event, no money competed 
for, no entrance charged or collected from competing 
horses, no admission fee charged to the gate or grand 
stand, and no privilege of any kind sold. Such per- 
formances shall not be considered public races.*' 

As will be seen by a careful reading of the above, 
but few clubs in the country can comply with all the 
requirements neeessary to avoid records. While the 
majority charge no gate receipts and have no public 
betting, many charge for seats in the grand stand and 
sell the privileges of cafe and bar for a goodly sum. 
After the new rule goes into effect it will be easy to 
tell what clubs are organized for pure sport. 



McKINNEY 2:111 will begin the season of 1902 at 
San Jose, February 1st, at $100 the season, 
limited to fifty mares. McKinney holds the champion- 
ship of all stallions of his age as a sire of extreme 
speed. At fourteen years he has four 2:10 performers, 
headed by Coney 2:02; nineteen 2:15 performers and 
twenty-eight in the 2:20 list. No other fourteen year 
old stallion ever approached this record. It is extreme 
speed that breeders are trying to get. The long list 
of 2:29J performers which were considered valuable a 
few years ago are not in such high regard in this day 
and generation. Time slower than 2:25 wins few races 
even out on the "bush" tracks. It should be stated 
that McKinney 's book for 1902 is very nearly filled 
already and owners who desire to breed their mares to 
the great son of Alcyone this year had better corre- 
spond with Mr. Durfee at San Jose immediately. Mc- 
Kinney 's ad vertisement will be found in this issue. 



SIDNEY DILLON, sire of the fastest trotting mare 
of the Grand Circuit of 1901, Dolly Dillon 2:07- 
will be in the stud this year to a few outside mares at 
the very low fee of $35. He will be kept at Santa Rosa 
Stock Farm. Sidney Dillon is a son of Sidney and a 
full brother to Cupid 2:18 and Adonis 2:11$. We be- 
lieve that every one of the get of Sidney Dillon and 
Cupid that'have started have secured records. Sidney 
Dillon is a horse of magnificent conformation and gets 
extreme speed with great uniformity. 



TWO THOROUGHBRED STALLIONS, one great 
as a race horse and great as a sire, the other a 
young horse of most royal lineage, are advertised in 
our columns this week to make the season of 1902 at 
the Menlo Stock Farm. They are St. Carlo the won- 
derful young sire by St. Blaise, and Ossary son of the 
great Ormonde. St. Carlo has proven his worth on 
the track and in the stud. Ossary is probably the 
handsomest young horse in California today, and his 
blood lines are such that he is almost certain to prove 
one of the greatest of speed and stamina sires. 



THE BOARD OF APPEALS of the National Trot- 
ting Association will meet at 36 Geary street on 
Tuesday next, January 21st. 



DALO ALTO BROODMARES and stallions will be 
• eagerly sought after in a few years. The famous 
breeding farm is to be dispersed and within another 
year all the horses will have passed under the hammer. 
The sale of 25 mares and three stallions from this 
farm, which will take place at the Occidental Horse 
Exchange on the 30th inst, will give buyers an oppor- 
tunity that will not again be offered, and when all are 
sold many persons will regret they did not buy when 
they had the chance. We ask every reader of the 
Breeder and Sportsman who wants a broodmare 
or a stallion to send to William G. Layng, Auctioneer, 
721 Howard street, for a catalogue of this sale. Study 
the blood lines in the mares and stallions offered and 
be at the salesyard when the auction begins. Elec- 
tioneer blood is the need of most California stock farms. 
Wilkes blood is very plentiful here and it is the very 
best cross to make with Electioneer stock. There is 
an old saying that opportunity knocks at every per- 
son's door once. It is knocking at yours now. Don't 
go to sleep and permit it to pass on. 



WILKES DIRECT 2:22$, son of Nutwood Wilkes 
2:16$ and full brother to the great wagon trotter 
John A. McKerron 2:06iJ, will again make a season at 
San Jose, at a fee of $40. Wilkes Direct is a grand 
individual, having size, style and substance in the 
superlative degree. He is a producer of speed, all his 
get showing this quality as soon as they are put on the 
training track, and a few of them will be old enough 
this year to be raced and will take records. A green 
three year old by Wilkes Direct showed a sixteenth at 
San Jose last fall in seven seconds, at the pace, which 
is a running horse clip. 



FB. LINFIELD, Professor of Animal Industry at 
• the Agricultural College of Logan, Utah, is in 
California with a view of purchasing a few Shorthorns 
and Holsteins for the college's experiment station. 
While coming through Nevada Prof. Linfield visited 
the celebrated Los Alamos Stock Farm and selected 
several good representatives of its herd of Herefords 
for the college. 

Important Seizure of Illegal Nets. 

Deputy Fish Commissioners Manuel Cross and W. 
H. Welch last week succeeded in capturing and con- 
fiscating six seines that were found illegally in use in 
the Russian river. The nets were principally the 
property of "shackers" living on Penny island, near 
the mouth of the river. As the nets averaged from 
$75 to $150 in value, the set back to the Manila men 
and their confederate poachers was a serious one — the 
value of the nets exceeded by far the prices received 
by these law violating foreigners and their abettors, 
some renegade white men of that section, in the sale 
of fish peddled through Guernevilleand to the ranchers 
in the adjoining districts. This seizure, is, in fact, one 
of the largest ever made by the Fish Commissioners 
in the history of their surveillance of the river. 

Cross and Welch quietly and unseen slipped off the 
train at Duncan's on Thursday and remained secreted 
until dark, then setting out in a boat they proceeded 
down the river. Before going far, Cross, who knows 
every foot of the river came upon a net set across the 
river. This was taken up and hidden on the bank, 
proceeding in their quest again they searched several 
likely places without success until several turns were 
taken through the "Swiss pool." 

This second net was stowed away on the bank and 
again the two deputies kept on down the river until 
Penny island was reached; here a net was found after 
some piking about here and there. Hiding this one 
behind a log on shore, shortly afterwards another net 
was located near a fence. Proceeding around to a 
rocky part of the island still another net was caught 
by the grappling iron. By this time it was getting 
along to daylight Friday, the two officers turned back 
up the river, picking up the captured seines as they 
went along, the heavy load of two men and the nets 
caused the small boat to sink so that her gunwales 
were within about two inches of the water's surface. 
The last net was found more by accident than design. 
It was discovered exactly opposite the spot where the 
first net was pulled up. The river here had been 
obstructed by two nets end to end, thus effectually 
blocking the passage of fish up stream. When the 
first net was taken up, the other one was naturally 
overlooked, as the two merely lapped but were not 
fastened together. 

On several of the nets the mid-stream anchors were 
so bulky that the officers used their knives, it being 
found more expedient to do so than to take the time 
for the arduous work of pulling up the anchors. 

Prior to the advent of the two deputies, threats 
were made by the netmen to the effect that they would 
indulge in some shooting in the protection of their 
illegally used property. The deputies were ready to 
take a hand in the promised scrimmage last week, but 
they did not happen to be discovered and the seizure 
went on peacefully and kappily, if it was hard work 
on an exceedingly dark night 

Since last week, other parties, notably seven or eight 
Indians, have been using nets in the stream. These 
fellows are as full of threats as the Penny island gaDg 
was. These latter gentry are all mad as hornets and 
promise summary vengeance on the patrol at their 
next visit. Cross and Welch are both tried men, Cross 
particularly, in looking after illegal fishermen. It is 
an odds on bet that the deputies' repeating rifles will 
be the first to open the argument should the river men 
be inclined to lock horns with them. Both of them 
are good shots and we opine the battle will be short 
and one sided. 



January 18, 1902] 



7 



RECORDS BROKEN LAST YEAR. 

iqoi Not So Prolific in New Records as the 
Year Previous. 

Americans are a people of extremes. Records have 
been magnified in importance until, on the running 
turf, they have become slightly ridiculous except in 
specific cases, writes Will D. Pond. On the trottiDg 
turf they are still paramount for the simple reason 
that there the time is the handicap base. To-day an 
expert trainer or owner looks at a broken record with 
varying eyes and sentiments. If it is a three year old 
or upward stallion or mare, especially the former, he 
recognizes its value as a stud factor, especially when 
condition and surroundings are normal and not especi- 
ally favorable. Even here, however, he makes mental 
reservations, for how many of our individual flyers 
have transmitted their famous speed to their progenj^ 
except in the sprint division. What mark has Salva- 
tor's famous mile in 1 :35i made on the private slate of 
his progeny? Thus the horseman only values a record 
made by a mature horse over a distance. He does not 
care about sprint records at all, and as for two year 
old performances, well, look through the three year 
olds of last year and see how many of the good per. 
formers broke records in 1900, and how these contrast 
with the stars of the division of 1901. 

It is the public and the newspaper headline writer 
who welcome new records, and the public only takes 
an evanescent interest in them, almost legislating them 
out of calculation when next the dope is referred to 
for the purpose of calculations on a future race. 

Looked at in the abstract, records are more due to 
surroundings than anything else. Many would have 
been made but for slight interference, forced wide 
around a turn or crossed in the stretch, and these are 
never noticed. One of the fastest miles last season was 
run in 1:38; this means that to beat 1:38J the horse 
covered twenty-six feet more in a given time. That is 
a matter of twenty-five yards, or, on a two turn track, 
the difference between on the rail at the turns or 
making them in third position on the outside, half a 
length apart. All things equal the winner makes 1:38, 
the other horse, carried wide, runs twenty-six feet 
further and is beaten that distance. Yet number one 
makes "a record." 

In the old days tracks were uninclosed lots, with 
stumps sticking up in all directions, the footing was 
precarious, the horses knew it and naturally did not 
dare go to their greatest speed. Herein lies much of 
the wonderful improvement of speed claimed since 
those days. Today the tracks are safe, horses are con- 
fident, and speed records are shown which thirty years 
ago were impossible for horses of the same class. 
Thirty years ago 70 horses stabled at the track made 
a phenomenal meeting. Today 700 is nothing extra- 
ordinary. Then horses ran a dozen or so races a year. 
Today horses run fifty races or more, the stars running 
ten to twenty, while the great Boston up to nine years 
of age did not run more, and few of his day ran so 
often. 

Last year only sixty-nine new track and event 
records were made in this country, and of these the 
metropolitan tracks only account for twenty-two, the 
Western and Southern tracks totaling forty-seven. In 
1900 the total list was 112, of which the metropolitan 
meetings handed in fifty-one. Yet last season the 
general class of two year and three year olds was 
acknowledged to be better. Why is this? 

The answer shows up another phase of the record 
worship. The great increase in metropolitan records 
during the season of 1900 was due to the improved 
track conditions. Brighton Beach and Empire City 
set the pace with an almost "skinned track, " that is, 
one with only a bare inch, or even less, of top dressing, 
more on the style of the western track, and this, with 
extra banked turns, slaughtered records wholesale, 
but — were the animals going any faster, was the aver- 
age horse of a higher calibre? Scarcely! Then where 
comes in the record kudos! In addition to this Morris 
Park had a very thin dressing, and the most perfect 
drainage system down the Eclipse Course of any in the 
country, as instanced by its dryness when the main 
track repeatedly is "heavy," and all of this boosted 
along the accumulation of record marks. 

Right through the West track conditions have been 
improved, and that is where the individual track 
record has boomed. In 1901 New Orleans made four- 
teen additions to the old list at three and a half, six 
and seven furlongs, seven and a aalf furlongs, a mile, 
a mile and a quarter, a mile and seventy yards, a mile 
and three-eighths, a mile and a half (two), a mile and 
three-eighths, yet who will say that any of these 
record breakers could live with the cracks at Wash- 
ington Park or Coney Island? Yet they broke records! 
And secured headlines! But who will remember them 
except the owners. 

Nine more fell at Tanforan, all from three furlongs 
to six and a half furlongs, with the exception of the 



fivo furlongs, which stands, 1:00 flat. Practically a 
new course in 1900! Harlem breaks six, four, five, five 
and a half furlongs, a milo and fifty yards and a mile 
and a sixteenth, while Washington Park takes four 
new marks — four and a half and live furlongs, a mile 
and a quarter and a mile and a half. St Louis also 
claims four, at four and a half, six and four furlongs 
and at a mile, at the Fair Grounds. Hawthorne only 
takes two for the season. 

Coming East, Aqueduct Spring meeting only fur- 
nished one, at six furlongs, the Lorillard cast off, little 
Petra IL, in 1:13 4-5. At the Morris Park Spring 
meeting Commando made a mile and three-eighths, 
over the hill, in 2:21, May 23th, easily beating his 
field, and, at the same weight, dropping Ildrim's 
record of 2:21 A, made in 1900. At Brooklyn Spring 
Commando again, simply galloping, Juno 1st, made a 
mile in 1:39 2-5. 

Coney Island started the Suburban with Alcedo 2:05 
3-5; Nasturtium covering fivo and a half furlongs in 
1:04 1-5, Hatasoo getting away with the five furlong 
notch in 0:58 2-5, and then Voter made the six furlongs 
in 1:12 2-5, beating the 1895 record of Waltzer. June 
21 Glennellie, six and a half furlongs in 1:19 1-5, cut 
down Irish Reel's notch of 1895; Brigadier ran a mile 
in 1:37 4-5 June 22, beating Voter's American record of 
1900; Star Bright, June 28, ran a mile and a quarter in 
2:06 1-5, beating Central Trust's good race in 1897. 
These were the crack Coney Island record breakers. 
What may be expected of them in the future? Voter, 
Brigadier, Glennellie and Star Bright — will they race 
again? 

Saratoga established two new times with Decanter 
at the mile and a quarter in 2:06, beating Laverock, 
1899, and Belle of Lexington six furlongs, beating with 
1:12 2-5 the previous time of Voter in 1899. 

Brighton Beach had four new notches: Leonora 
Loring, a good Western filly, five and a half furlongs, 
1:06 4-5; Herbert, a mile and a sixteenth in 1:45 1-5, 
beating Standing's record; Sombrero, another good 
Westerner, five furlongs in 0:59 2-5, beating Songster 
in 1900, and Roehampton, a mile and an eighth in 1:51 
1-5, Incidentally note the promising 2 year old Som- 
brero cutting the notch of the crippled 6 year old St. 
Blaise gelding, who is lucky to stand up to the termi- 
nation of any race he starts in, and consequently 
generally wins around 50 to 1. Yet he makes track 
records. 

At the Coney Island Fall meeting not a record went 
by the board. At Brooklyn Fall came a bundle. 
Ogden ran a mile and a sixteenth in 1:46, beating the 
earlier record of All Green in June (who "never did 
anything since"). King Hanover beat the Endurance 
by Right record by covering five and a half furlongs 
in 1:06 4-5 September 28th, and Endurance, with 112 
pounds, made six furlongs in 1:08 3-5, beating the 
record of King Pepper, a three year old, with 125 
pounds, 1:09 2-5, the previous June. Then The 
Rhymer went the mile and seventy yards in 1:44 4-5. 

The Morris Park Fall meeting provided only four 
new times: October 12th, when Roxane ran the 
Wither3 Mile in 1:39 4-5; Hernando, a mile and a half 
in 2:34 4-5; October 25th, Lady Uncas, six and a half 
furlongs in 1:19|, and October 26th, Gold Heels, two 
miles and a quarter in .3:56. 

These are the new marks; what do they practically 
amount to? Each record breaker has been beaten, 
with one exception, on merits by those which lost 
when the records were made. How much figure does 
the straight, uninterfered run cut when the average 
record is made? Some were made down hill, where 
other horses in the race notoriously cannot run. Some 
were made down the Futurity Course by the horse 
lying on the rail as large fields swung round that still 
rather acute turn. Two certainly were made by a 
lucky opening on the rail in the last half furlong, which 
enabled the horse to win by three lengths, in one case, 
where but for the opening ho would not have been 
third. The time was clipped one-fifth of a second. 
There is no need to mention the names in specific 
cases; the horses hold the figure; lot them have it. 
An iconoclast Is never welcome, and, while the state- 
ment would assuredly pull down, it builds nothing to 
replace it. 

Now glance at the English record time of 1900, 
Ono mile, 1:33 1-5; mile and a quarter, 2:04 1-5; milo 
and a half, 2:31 2-5; mile and three-quarters, 2:59 1-5; 
mile and threo furlongs, 2:19 2-5; six furlongs, 1:12 2-5; 
five furlongs, 0:57 1-5. Those nearly all on straighta- 
way tracks, mostly grass. The mile and a half record 
was by the American horso, King Courier, 126 pounds 
Hurst Park, September 22, 19C0. 



"Indian Jimmy" Morgan, the jockey who has been 
riding so successfully in Austria during tho past two 
years, has decided not to return to that country, but 
will ride at the Chicago tracks next season. Morgan 
headed the list of winning jockeys in Austria in 1900, 
and last year stood third. Fred Taral being at the top 
and Bob Adams, an Englishman, second. 



At the Salem Track. 

Mr. W. O. Trine writes tho Bkekdek and Sports- 
man from the fairgrounds, near Salem, Orogon, under 
date of January 12th, as follows: 

"We are having a very nice winter for Oregon. The 
track here is in good shape for winter work. Mr. 
Shanon is jogging a young horse by Cceur d'Alene 
that is a good prospect for the green classes, also a 
young mare by Homdel and one by Gorome. I am 
jogging Oregon Bull 2:17* by Roy Wilkes and Broad- 
heart, a six year old by a son of Roy Wilkes that has 
extra stylo, size and substance. I expect to make a 
short season here with him and fit him for the races 
I expect some good colt stake prospects to handle soon. 

"We expect to have a real 'Grand Circuit' in the 
Northwest this season with good stakes and purses and 
dates arranged so that horsemen may ship from point 
to point without any delay or big expense. I also 
hope and sincerely believe that our fair managers will 
prohibit -syndicato book making which has caused the 
downfall of so many fairs and associations." 

SADDLE NOTES. 



Get a race horse at your own price at the dispersa 
s le of thoroughbreds belonging to the estate of J. B. 
Chase, deceased. The sale takes place February 4th. 
Send for a catalogue. 

The two year olds, Tom Mitchell, San Reno and 
Winifred Weare, all from the Poverty Row Stock 
Farm, owned by Oscar Duke, are now at the Oakland 
track, also the six year old mare Nell Holton. 



Instead of being run on May Is*, the Kentucky 
Derby will not come off until Saturday, May 3d. The 
change was brought about by the postponement of the 
opening day. The meeting at Louisville will only laat 
nineteen days, instead of the twenty-one which have 
been alloted to the club. 



Buy one of those yearlings or two year olds at the 
sale of thoroughbreds from the estate of J. B. Chase, 
feed it well for a year and the chances are you will 
have a race winner. There have been many bred on 
the Sonoma Stock Farm. Send to W. H. Hord, 1732 
Market street for a catalogue. 



Edward F. Fallon, formerly of Hollister, who dropped 
dead last Saturday through running to catch the Bay 
City for Oakland, owned and raced several good horses 
in his day. The best known of the Fallon flyers were 
Harriet by Flood, Birdcatcher by Spectre, Abbie F. 
by Judge McKinstry, Lottie L. by Wildidle- Vixen, 
Hathaway by Birdcatcher and Echo by Judge Mc- 
Kinstry. Mr. Fallon bred horses for years on his 
farm, which adjoined the Donnelly Dunn ranch, in 
San Benito county, and was well known among the 
racing men of ten and twenty years ago. Financial 
misfoitune overtook him in the last few years, and in 
his old age he was forced to return to his old trade, 
that of painting. 

It is not an easy task to prove beyond doubt the 
offences of some trainers who for percentage and gain 
fill the horses with "hop," but the officials of the La- 
tonia Jockey Club have promised that there will be no 
in and out running at the spring meeting from this 
cause. In the estimate of expenses for the next meet- 
ing at Latonia a liberal allowance has been made for 
the employment of five shrewd men. "They will not 
alone pay attention to the men who administer 'dope,' 
but they will have their eyes on the entire scope of the 
racing game, "said a member of the club recently. 
"We are going to have clean racing in this vicinity 
from this time hence, and the men who make racing 
may as well understand it at the outset." 

Like all good things, Jackson's Napa Soda has* 
dozen counterfeits. Watch out ! 



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8 



[January 18, 1902 



1 ROD, GUN AND KENNEL. 

Wtfi Conducted by J. X. I>e WITT. 



Coming Events. 

Bencll Shows. 

Feb 4 5. 6-Rbode Island Konnel Club. Annual bench show 
Providence, R I. George D. Miller, Secretary 

Feb. II, 12 13, H-Westminster Kennel Club James Mortimer 
Superintendent, New York City. 

Feb 2n-March I— Duquesne Kennel Club of Western Pennsyl- 
vania. F. S. Stedman. Secretary, Pittsburg, Pa. 

Field Trials. 

Jan 20-United States Field Trial Club. Annual trials. Grand 
Junction, Tenn W. S. Stafford. Secretary, Trenton, Tenn. 

Feb. 3— Alabama Field Trial Club. Fifth annual trials. Madi- 
son, Ala. T. H. Spencer, Secretary-treasurer. 

Feby. 8-Continental Field Trial Club. Annual trials. Grand 
Junction. Tenn. Theo. Sturgis, Secretary, Greenfield Hill, (,oun. 



Pacific Coast Field Trials. 

The nineteenth annual field trials of the Pacific Coast 
Field Trial Club was commenced with the Derby last 
Monday morning on favorable ground in the vicinity 
of Santa Maria, Santa Barbara. A late start was 
made, the first brace being cast off at 9:15 a. m. 
Weather conditions were unfavorable, the day being 
a warm one with not a breath of air to cool off men 
and dogs until about two o'clock in the afternoon. 
The dry condition of theground selected for the Derby 
spoiled the scent, the dogs could not smell the quail 
until they had almost run over them. Had there been 
a recent fall of rain, the grounds selected would have 
been almost as perfect a field trial district as can be 
found in the State. Quail were just numerous enough 
and the cover was just high and close onough to allow 
the dogs to work well and enable the judge and attend- 
ant sportsmen a good opportunity to observe every 
move. 

The number of starters in the Derby was a great 
disappointment to all concerned. Out of twenty-one 
entries ou which second forfeit was paid, there was but 
seven starters in the stake. Death and distemper re- 
duced the ranks of the young dogs sadly and this was 
responsible for the falling off in the number of starters. 
W. W. Van Arsdale's Belle Buoy was not taken to the 
grounds by his trainer, C. Babcock, when he located 
there before the trials. Clinton E. Worden's Lady 
Jane and Alberta both died. Judge A. Balmer, of 
Cle-Elum, Washington, presided in the saddle. His 
decisions throughout the trials were satisfactory to 
club members, owners and handlers. 

During the trials a representative attendance of 
sportsmen took keen interest in the work. The per- 
formances generally of the dogs and of several indi- 
viduals in particular showed in the opinion of Judge 
Balmer most exceptional natural abilities. Mr. Frank 
Maskey is authority for the statement that the work 
of the dogs in both the Derby and All-Age events was 
as high class an exhibition as the most ardent enthu- 
siast could desir . 

Contrary to the misleading headlines and reports 
which appeared in the daily press here, and evidently 
penned by writers unfamiliar with field trials, there 
was happily not a large crowd or crush of sportsmen 
and spectators. This condition prevailing during the 
running of the dogs is always detrimental to good 
results and is a positivo annoyance and inconvenience 
to those most interested. 

On Tuesday a party composed of Henry J. Crocker, 
Thomas H. Williams, Jr., John B. Coleman, James 
Brownell, Clarence Waterhouse and Adam Andrews 
left this city in a special car destined for the trial 
ground. 

The following is a brief account of the trials and 
results. A fuller and more complete report by Sec- 
retary Albert Bet/, will appear in next week's issue ol 
the Breeder and Sportsman. Mr. Betz's report 
was received too late for publication in this number: 

The first brace put down on Monday morning in the 
sagebrush Hats ten miles west of Santa Maria was 
watched by about twonty-five sportsmen in carriages 
and on horseback. 

W. B. Coutts' Pointer bitch Kenwood Rose and 
Clinton E. Worden's English Setter Wade Earl were 
down until 9:05. 

The second brace put down at 10:15. was W. B. 
Coutts' Pointer, Ned Funston, and H. L. Bettens' 
English Setter, Rods Lark. They were ordered up at 
11:15. The weather during the heat had become very 
warm. 

Stockdale Kennels* Pointer, Cuba Jr., and H. L. 
Bettens* Setter, Diana's Hodfield, were the third brace 
put down during the warmest part of the day and 
were ordered up, thoroughly exhausted at 11:40. 

W. W. Van Arsdale's Setter, Oakley's Pride, had 
drawn the bye and was then given a try-out. This 
work ended the first series. 

After luncheon new grounds wore selected. A 
pleasant, cooling breeze now made conditions more 
favorable for running the second series. 

T.be first pair were cast off at 1:30 p. m. Kenwood 
Rose and Rod's Lark. They were taken up at 2:15. 
This pair was followed by Ned Funston and Cuba Jr., 
at 2:30 and remained down until 2:55. Diana's Rod- 
field and Oakley's Pride came together in the third 
heat. They were down 45 minutes and then taken up. 

Judge Balmer, after a short consultation with the 
members of the club committee, about 4 p. m. an- 
nounced that the running was concluded for the day, 
and upon reaching the hotel at Santa MariaJ it 
developed that the Derby had been finished. Judgo 
Balmer announced the winners as follows: 

First — Stockdale Kennels' liver and white Pointer 



dog, Cuba Jr., by Cuba of Konwood-Florida, whelped 
on March 13, 1900; breeder, Stockdale Kennels. 

Second — H. L. Betten's white, black and tan English 
Setter bitch, Rod's Lark, by Rod field-Count's Diana, 
whelped September 7, 1900; breeder, H. L. Betten. 

Third — W. B. Coutts' liver and white Pointer dog, 
Ned Funston, by Kriss Kringle-Plain Sistor, whelped 
September, 1900; breeder, W. B. Coutts. 

The second day of the mooting, on Tuesday morn- 
ing, commenced under more favorable weather condi- 
tions, it being cooler than on the preceding day the 
dogs stood the running better; the dry state of the 
ground, however, made pointing as difficult as on the 
previous day. Quail were found with evory brace put 
down, yet they were not too plentiful. Fifteen dogs 
were started in the All-Age, Mt. View Kennels Fan Go 
drawing the bye. 

The lirst brace were cast off at 9 o'clock A. M. in a 
largo field. The dogs soon got tangled up in a dense 
thicket and were taken out and put back of the first 
ground. They were taken up at the end of 45 minutes. 
The dogs in the first heat were Stockdale Kennels' 
Setter bitch Peach Mark II. and W. W. Van Arsdale's 
Setter dog Count's Mark. 

Stockdale Kennels' Pointer Cuba Jr. and T. J. A. 
Tiedemann's Setter bitch Northern Huntress were the 
second pair put down. 

W. W. Van Arsdale's English Setter bitch Shadow 
and Stockdale Kennels' Pointer Bow's Son were put 
down for the third heat at 10:55. These dogs were 
swung off at first on open ground and then put back on 
scattered birds. 

Stockdale Kennels' Pointer Jacuba and W. W. Van 
Arsdale's Setter Peach Blossom were the first brace 
cast oil' after lunch at 12:30 o'clock. 

Cos. Terry's Setter bitch Lady and Stockdale Ken- 
nels' Pointer Cuba's Zep followed at 1:30 P. M. 

A change was then made to ground four miles nearer 
to town and two Pointers, Stockdale Kennels' Nellie 
Wilson and Mt. View Kennels' Alec C. — both field trial 
veterans — came together in a heat which lasted from 
2:45 to 3:40 P. M. 

The last pair put down for tho day and the final 
heat of the first series of tho All-Age started at 3:45 in 
a large field alongside of a creek bottom. They were 
W. W. Van Arsdale's Pointer, Dr. Daniels, and Clinton 
E. Worden's Pearl's Jingle. These two dogs are 
credited with the most interesting race of the day. 
This finished the first series. The bye dog, Fan (Jo, 
having been tried out during the afternoon by the 
club committee at the request of Judge Balmer. 

J. M. Kilgariff and J. E. Terry arrived at Santa 
Maria on Wednesday's train. 

A noticeable absence amon? the old guard was tho 
genial features of Charles N. Post of Sacramento, who 
for the first time in the history of the club trials was 
unavoidably kept away from the sport by important 
professional work for the State in one of the northern 
counties. 

The second series of the All-Age was started at 9 
o'clock Wednesday morning on new ground where 
birds wore more plentiful. The sportsmen attending 
had tho adv ntago of taking position upon a range of 
hilly ground from whence they had an unobstructed 
view of the dogs, hanalers and judge in the valley 
beneath. The day was an ideal one for field trial 
work and the dogs showed up in better shape than at 
any previous time of the trials. 

The first brace down was Dr. Daniel with Cuba Jr., 
followed successively by Count's Mark with Northern 
Huntress, Pearl's Jingle with Peach Blossom, Fan Go 
with Lady After a short intermission the judge 
ordered Peach Blossom and Northern Huntress cast 
off for a rather long heat tj determine which was the 
better of the two. 

Secretary Betz. after the dogs were taken up, an- 
nounced the winners as follows: 

First — W. W. Van Arsdale's lemon and white Pointer 
dog Dr. Daniels by Plain Sam-Dolly Dee II. 

Second — Clinton E. Worden's liver and white Pointer 
bitch Pearl's Jingle by Young Jingo-Pearl's Dot II. 

Equal third — W. W. Van Arsdale's black, white and 
tan English Setter bitch Peach Blossom by Count 
Gladstone IV. -Peach Mark, and T. J. A. Tiedemann's 
black, white and tan English Setter bitch Northern 
Huntress by Joe Ciunmings-Mecca II. 

The results of the two events gives a decidedly 
Pointer coloring to the meeting, as this breed carried 
away the principal honors. 

It was decided not to start the Members' Stake this 
year. The All-Age finished the meeting earlier than 
was anticipated, which allowed a number of the sports- 
men in attendance to enjoy some delightful quail 
shooting. 

♦ 

Apropos of the Coast field trials we notice in the 
Kennel Gazette the announcement of the English Ken- 
nel Club field trials to be run on April 9th and follow- 
ing days, over the estate of Captain Prettyman, M. P., 
at Orwell Park, near Ipswich. The draw will take 
place at the Great vVhite Horse Hotel, Ipswich, on the 
evening of April Nth. The following prizes are offered 
for the twenty-eighth field trial Derby Stakes for 
Pointer and Setter puppies whelped in 1901: First 
prize £70, second prize £25, third prize £15, fourth 
prize £10; fifth and sixth prizes, £5 each, will also be 
awarded if there are not less than twenty contestants. 

Derby Stake entries closed on January 1, 1902. In 
the All-Aged Stake the prizes are £50 to first, £25 to 
second, £10 each to third and fourth respectively. 
Further prizes for tho "brace" stakes for Pointers and 
Setters, dogs and bitches, are also offered. 



A Leading Fox Terrier Kennel. 

In tho konnel advertisements appears to-day the an- 
nouncement of the Wandee Kennels. 

Vibo, a cracking good Fox Terrier who has a grand 
Eastern and local bench record, is at the head of the 
stud list Vibo's record as a sire has been a consistent 
one, his latest success is the win of his son Norfolk 
Blue, who took first limit and winners at the Philadel- 
phia show last month, beating some good ones in 
Dusky Don If, Selden Stuyve and Norfolk Richmond. 
The latter dog, it will be remembered, went over 
everything at the last May show here. 

Wandee Jester (Norfolk Billy before he was regis- 
tered) has a good Eastern record and was a winner at 
tho Oakland show. 

Mr. Chas. K. Harley, the owner of the kennels, in- 
formed us during a visit to this office that he has 
several fine brood bitches and some exceptionally good 
puppies that he will sell — he has more terriors than he 
cares to accommodate. 



Only a Few of Them Left. 

The following communication, written on a postal 
card, from a resident of this city. sp~aks for itself: 

"Messrs. Breeder and Sportsman — Dear Sir: 
Kindly let me know if you ever hear of anyone wishing 
to exchange a Pointer for a ped. Setter." 

We have never yet heard of any swap conditions 
that might fill the above request and trust we never 
will. As the writer is not explicit in his message we 
are in the dark as to the reason for this inquiry, 
although the inference is easy. Just what a ped. 
Setter is we cannot imagine, and must again rely upon 
speculation, taking it that the writer means a Setter 
with a known pedigree. All dogs have pedigrees of 
course, but many of them cannot be traced back one 
generation. Another inference is that the writer has 
a greater idea of the Pointer's value than that of the 
Setter's. He does not say, however, which dog he i-< 
the ownor of and here speculation is rife again. 

We do not think the dog owned by such an indiffer- 
ent master would have a pleasant or an easy existence. 

We would advise our correspondent to sell his dog 
or give it away to a friend and purchase another one. 
Ir that way ho will get just what ho wants and solve 
what to us is a riddle. If this is too much trouble, 
call upon the Pound master. 

We will not speculate again, to the effect, that the 
writer is like some people wo have met, and desires to 
procure a good dog for little or nothing. The ranks 
of this class is sufficiently full now and we hope our 
esteemed correspondent has not started off wrong. 
Another thing, the writer states neither the accom- 
plishments of his own dog nor the standard of canine 
education required of tho dog ho evidently desires in 
exchange. If he would like to try his luck on Pointers 
we know of one that waited on table and played the 
piano evenings at a country hotel last year. This dog 
had a disagreeable habit of d ropping his set of false 
teeth when playing tho crescendo part of the Virginia 
reel. The teeth rolling among the dancers, the music 
would stop until the grinders were retrieved. Several 
fastidious young ladies complained to the landlord, 
the Pointer consequently lost his job and became a 
setter waiting for something to turn up. If a ped. 
Setter is the kind of dog wanted we will refer our 
correspondent to Dustproof Harry tor some pointers 
on Countess Noble stock — for undoubtedly she was a 
dog that could and did do anything and everything. 

The address given on the postal, somewhere on 25th 
street, leads us to infer, once more, that the backwoods 
is still located in a portion of the Mission valley. 



DOINGS IN DOGDOM. 



At the last meeting of the Executive Committee of 
the A. K. C.| L. A. Klein was allowed thirty days to 
secure further evidence in the matter of his appeal for 
the rescinding of the cancellation of his wins at the 
May show. 

English leashmen are hard at work preparing their 
best dogs for the great Waterloo cup event, which will 
be run next month. The raising of the quarantine 
against Irish hounds will cause a large number of Irish 
cracks to be entered. The great bitch, Fearless Foot- 
steps, twice winner of the classic event, will be entered 
again, and her chances look bright for final honors. 
The judge and slipper have as yet not been selected by 
the Waterloo cup committee, but it is almost a cer- 
tainty that Messrs. Brice and Wilkinson will officiate. 



Jackson's Napa Soda is sold in every citv, town and 
hamlet in the State. 



In a review of last year's coursing in England, the 
London Fiekls&ys: "The sport of coursing is decidedly 
on the 'up line' now in all parts of the country. Of 
course, in the old days, when farmers were doing well, 
there was hardly one of them who did not own a Grey- 
hound, perhaps chiefly for private coursing, but 
directly one dog had shown himself much superior to 
his rivals he was entered in the nearest public meeting. 
Then the greatest interest was shown in his progress — 
if any — by all owners of dogs beaten by him, so that 
they might know the standing of their own breed. 
Now the keeping of Greyhounds has fallen into other 
hands, and, although in many parts of the north we 
see an owner with one dog only, it is much more often 
the case that he owns some six to a dozen, and has his 
own private trainer. If a less number they are most 
likely sent to a public trainer, of whom there are many 
in all parts of the country. The breeding of almost 
every dog running at a public meeting is known at the 
present time, and in another year or so the pedigree of 
every Greyhound will be obtainable. The National 
Coursing Club has done much for the sport all over 
the three countries, and, with its admirable Stud Book, 
published annually, makes every effort to keep the 
sport pure." 



Januaky 18, 1902 J 



9 



Warfare Waged on Wolves. 



J, MAYNK HALTIMOllK. 

Eastern Oregon is famous as a sheep rearing region. 
Prom time immemorial, the coyote has had a desided 
weakness for mutton. 

Throughout Eastern Oregon there are a great many 
tracts characterized by "sand, alkali and sagebrush. - ' 
All such country is the favorite habitat of the coyote, 
tie is indiginous to the region, an 1 his home brings 
him in close contact to immense flocks of sheep. 

For many years the coyote has been a most persist- 
ent and dreaded enemy of the sheep raiser. Every 
arm has been raised against this sly, skulking prowler 
of field, plain and fell. He has been hunted with dogsi 
shot on sight, trapped and poisoned. The animal not 
only holds its own against such odds, but, it is claimed, 
is actually slowly on the Increase. 

Little wonder then that the various counties of the 
great "Inland Empire" (for such Eastern Oregon is 
called), should offer a bounty of $2 for every scalp pro- 
duced of a coyote. This price set upon his head, 
makes the animal still more sought after. 

Winter, spring, summer and fall, the merry chase 
goes on after his tawny scalp. A great many are cap- 
tured, too. In some of the counties as high as 100 
scalps are taken in a month. Some persons do nothing 
else but hunt the coyote, and they find it quite remun- 
erative work. 

Great care is taken by the' county authorities to 
prevent imposition in the matter of scalps. Every 
scalp must include both ears of the animal. There 
must be no "manufactured " scalps. There is an in- 
spector in each county who must pass upon the scalps. 

Just across the eastern boundary line of Oregon lies 
Idaho. Now, the latter State offers no bounty for 
coyote scalps. Idaho is also a favorite abode for the 
animal. However, a hunter cannot receive a bounty 
on a scalp captured across the line. Oregon will not 
pay for the scalp of an Idaho wolf — that is, if the 
authorities know it. 

But the incentive is strong, and, sometimes, the 
scalp takers do some steep swearing when the question 
is raised: "Where did you kill this wolf?" 

If a hunter can inveigle a coyote across the line and 
"raise his hair," that is perfectly legitimate. 

Everyone knows how cunning and wary a coyote is. 
But an invisible, impalpable boundary is too much for 
even the cautious instinct of a wolf. So, it happens 
that in the course of the seasons a great many coyotes 
cross to and fro over the line. In a great many in- 
stances, it proves a veritable "dead line" to the wolf. 
Though a native of Idaho, he is slain on "webfoot" 
(nickname for Oregon) soil, and the lucky hunter gets 
his scalp. 

Boy hunters often do a "land office ' business in col- 
lecting scalps. Very recently, a lad in one of the sage 
brush counties made a "big killing." 

While out hunting early one morning, he was fortu- 
nate enough to shoot two female coyotes. Both were 
killed near the foot of some rocks. There was a large 
hole leading under the ledge, and the boy's dog began 
to scratch and whine at the opening. 

A spade and hoe were speedily procured and the lad 
hunter fell to work with a will. The digging was hard, 
but he persevered, and in the course of a few hours his 
labors were abundantly rewarded. 

Finally he reached the bottom of the wolf den. 
There he found two comfortable nests in which were 
ensconced sixteen little coyotes. These the boy and 
his dog quickly killed. Thus he captured eighteen 
scalps in less than half a day and made $36; for the in- 
spector allowed him a full bounty on all the little 
whelps. 

It is asserted that the wolves are not decreasing 
much, despite the efforts made to exterminate them. 
Were these efforts not so persistently made, the whole 
country would be soon overrun and there would be 
great havoc wrought among the vast flocks through- 
out the inland empire. 



The origin of the Fox Terrier is not certainly known, 
but they have been bred pure in the royal kennels of 
England for over 100 years. They are used for bring- 
ing all kinds of game out of the ground, and as com- 
panions for ladies and gentlemen are the aristocratic 
dog of the world to-day. Owners soon found them to 
be not only easily taught, but very imitative, and have 
developed into great farm dogs, as well as hunters and 
companions. As guard dogs they have no superior — 
always on the alert, ready to find the cause of the 
slightest noise. They are not generally vicious to peo- 
ple, but it is safest for any stranger at first to get per- 
mission before he bothers either the person or property 
of the master. As hunters they naturally take to all 
animals that burrow in the ground. They need no 
training for that, but, of course, improve with prac- 
tice. They are easily taught to tree all animals that 
climb. They are dead game and will fight to death or 
victory anything they consider prey. They have any 
amount of endurance, seldom ever showing signs of 
being tired. Their scent is good. They are not only 
pretty dogs, but there are none cleaner. They are 
excellent companions for children, as they will watch 
over them and inspire the child with their own deter- 
mination, obedience, humbleness and affection. 



On the Continent it is customary with exhibitors at 
bench shows to dye or stain their dogs' coats to make 
them appear of a richer color. This practice, accord- 
ing to a Belgian witness in a matter before the English 
courts, is countenanced by judges. The protest, it 
was claimed, should come from the owner of the dog 
who won second honors. 



California favorite hot weather drink— Jackson's 
Napa Soda. 



Rating of the Shows of 1902. 

Tho following list is given in compliance with the 
rules regarding the publication of tho rating of shows 
of the past year in the issue of The (Sazette for Decem- 
ber. The next shows given by any of the under- 
mentioned clubs will have a minimum rating, in accord- 
ance with this list: 

Dogs Mil.. 
Entered. Rating. 



Chicago Pet Dog Club 191 1 

Louisiana Kennel Club. 302 1 

Memphis Kennel Club 221 1 

Westminster Kennel Club 1549 5 

Rhode Island Kennel Club 385 2 

Duquesne Kennel Club 433 2 

New England Kennel Club 757 4 

Mascoutah Kennel Club 702 3 

San Francisco Kennel Club 617 5 

Pan American 568 1 

Middlesex East Agricultural Association 213 1 

Columbia Agricultural Society 182 1 

Champion Kennel Club 144 1 

Danbury Agricultural Society 263 2 

West Virginia S. F. A 160 1 

Atlanta Kennel Club 390 2 

Texas Kennel Club 415 2 

Los Angeles Association 147 1 

Colorado Kennel Club 225 1 

Philadelphia D. S. A 738 3 



Bulldogs in England in 1901. 

Many of the best Bulldogs England has produced 
for years past are now or were in the possession of 
American fanciers. The fancy for the breed has taken 
on rapid strides in the United States within a few 
years. The most prominent Bulldog kennels in 
America are the Vancroft and the Deal kennels. A host 
of other breeders, but on a smaller scale, tend to show 
the growth of the Bulldog fancy. The first lot of the 
Bulldog Kennel Book issued by the English Bulldog 
Club, was sold out in a week by Field and Fancy in 
New York. A continued demand was the occasion for 
a cable message for another supply. 

The following article by Mr. H. St. John Cooper of 
Brighton, England, appeared in a recent number o^ 
the Dog Fancier and contains some interesting infor- 
mation concerning the breed in England today: 

The year now drawing to its end has not proved a 
memorable one from the Bulldog enthusiasts' point of 
view. There have been practically no surprises unless 
the appearance at Cruft's Show in February, of that 
marvelous headed bitch, La Roche, be the exception. 
This bitch, whose body, it must be at once confessed, 
is not equal in quality to her wonderful head proper- 
ties, is a north country bred one, and made her first 
appearance in London, at Cruft's, where Mr. Todd, 
her breeder, but not her owner of course, gave her her 
first and well-deserved championship, since when she 
has gone on gathering in the prizes, for she is a bitch 
that cannot be denied, though enemies she has among 
the cognoscenti who would fain put her down and yet 
f3r their reputations' sake dare not. 

Chinosol — or to give him his full title and name, 
Champion Woodcoi>e Chinosol, the bright particular 
star of last year, has amply fulfilled all the promises of 
his youth and stands today the unquestioned best that 
England can show. To lovers of the true type, the 
recent successes of Mrs. Evans' well known old Ivel 
Doctor have been very gratifying. The all white dog 
has hitherto not met with the best of fortune, indeed 
his merits have been far in excess of his luck, for he is 
all over a Bulldog, sour-faced as Bulldogs should be 
and a shining example which many English breeders, 
who are apparently attempting to breed out all true 
Bulldog expression and characteristics, would do well 
to profit by. 

There is a very regrettalbe and growing tendency 
in England to produce soft, puggy-faced Bulldogs, 
whose skulls are round instead of flat, who boast no 
distance from ear to eye, and whose eyes are set far 
too close together. A few years ago, these soft-faced 
specimens were the exception, now unfortunately, they 
seem to be growing the rule, and so long as certain 
judges persist in favoring them, so long will breeders 
attempt to produce them. If we compare the head of 
Boomerang, in my opinion the best headed of all 
mondern dogs, with the heads of some of our present 
day "puggiosities" we can find absolutely nothing in 
common. The Boomerang type of head — the true 
type, was brim full of expression, it was at once sug- 
gestive of honesty, alertness, fearlessness and yet 
withal there was that sourness of look, that made the 
dog repulsive and forbidding even, to the uneducated 
eye, but which to the fancier, was an added charm and 
fascination. Another fault and a serious one, is the 
prevalence of heavy ears. True they are of the right 
shape, but the ear of the Bulldog should be small and 
thin, whereas nowadays, to see a really good eared 
dog on the bench is the exception and not the rule. 
Fortunately, however, certain large breeders are taking 
the ear question up in earnest and a marked improve- 
ment in this direction maybe confidently looked for 
in the near future. 

Despite tho fact that very many of our best have 
left these shores for yours, there seems ample promise 
that next year we shall be as rich in really high class 
Bulldogs as ever we were. The big exodus of last year 
has, no doubt, something to do with the rather low 
quality of this year's exhibit as a whole, but on every 
side I hear tidings of puppies of exceptional promise, 
many of them the offspring of some of those dogs who 
crossed the pond last year. 

Among others who have achieved considerable suc- 
cess this year, on the bench, are the Bull bitches, Fel- 
ton Chance It, Mrs. Marley's light weight, who has 



now won her right to the prefix champion, Thackeray 
Soda, another bitch who loses in body while she wins 
in head. Champion Prince Albert, Katorpult's famous 
little son, who has garnered up a few moro firsts and 
championships to add to his long list. Mrs. Crocker's 
bitch, Buddug, and Mrs. Clarke's Mersham Billy, litter 
brother to Mersham Jock, who was claimed by Amer- 
ica early in last yoar. Among other dogs whose stud 
services have been in greatest demand are W. J. Pegg's 
Champion Woodcote Chinosol by Bapton Monarch, 
who is sire also of Arthur Vowles' Wylio Monarch (a 
most prolific stock getter), and Carthusian Cerberus; 
Mr. Pegg's Woodcoto Galtee Moro, Mrs. Clarke's Mer- 
sham Charmer, Mrs. Evans' Ivel Doctor, and some 
lesser lights, whose principal attraction is a low stud 
fee. 

Death, fortunately, has not been very busy among 
the dogs, but I regret to hear that one old dog, who 
in his time has done good service to the breed, has 
just passed away at a ripe old ago. I allude to Mr. 
Hartley's Highwayman, who did a bit of winning in 
his time, but who will be remembered principally as 
the sire of many winning dogs and bitches. [Chinosol 
has also gone the final way of all canines. — Ed.] 

It is true that America has claimed most of our best 
dogs during the past few years, but it is also a fact 
that tho "stock" still remains in the old country, and 
from that stock, English breeders confidently expect 
to produce as good dogs in tho future as they have in 
the past. 



KENNEL HYGIENE. 

It is believed tkat a dog can digest one- fifth of his 
own body weight at one meal. 

It requires some six to twelve hours for the food 
taken at a single meal to become digested in tho 
stomach. Bones often take many hours to entirely 
disappear. 

Healthy, strong dogs have been known to live for 
three months without a particle of nourishment save 
water before death ensued. Such dogs can exist a 
month under similar conditions and then stand a good 
chance of recuperating if food be restored to them. 
A complete circulation of the blood in the dog is estab- 
lished in about seventeen seconds. The blood will, 
therefore, pass through the entire system nearly four 
times in one minute. 

The pulse of the dog, easily felt on the internal 
aspect of the thigh close up to the groin, should be 
about 90 to 100 in a healthy, full-grown animal. 

The respiratory movements in health are about 
fifteen to twenty. 



The normal temperature of the dog is from 101 
degrees F. to 102 degrees F. This temperature, which 
is about 3 degrees higher than normal temperature in 
man, should not be mistaken for fever. 

People who own dogs don't, as a rule, take much 
note of this particular point as long as health is pre- 
sent, but as soon as sickness manifests itself, be the 
temperature high or not, it is often at once investigated 
and the conclusion arrived at that fever is present, 
because the body heat is perceived to be higher than 
our own. 



To cause a copious secretion of rich, nourishing milk 
in a bitch with a laige family a diet should contain 
considerable amount of shell-fish or meat. 



The dog has important sweat glands in the feet. 



Too many baths or too much brushing is often the 
cause of a dog's coat coming off. 

Linseed oil (boiled) is a good thing to give in a dog's 
food to help him cast his coat. 



Pine shavings make excellent bedding, particularly 
for a dog troubled by fleas. A moderate quantity of 
coal oil sprinkled upon the shavings is a bad thing for 
fleas. 



Crude oil sprayed over tho ground or around tho 
kennels is about as good a thing to drive away fleas as 
one would wish. 



Dog biscuits, hound meal and scraps from the table, 
with a little raw, lean meat occasionally, is a good 
menu for Terriers, or any dog for that matter. 



County Game Laws in Force. 



The present State Game and Fish Laws are in force 
and unohanged in the following counties: 

Alameda. Monterey, Solano, 

Colusa, Santa Cruz, San Joaquin, 

Contra Costa, San Benito, Sonoma. 

Meroed. 

The following counties have adopted ordinances in 
regard to fish and game, and which are now in force 
as follows: 

Fresno— Quail, Nov. 1 to Fob. t, 

Marin— Male deer, Aug. 1 *o Sept. 15. Quail, Oct. 15 to Jan. 15. 
Shooting on county roads or In cemoterles prohibited. The use of 
"pump" gun, repeating shotgun or anj kind of maga/.ine shotgun 
for hunting in the county is prohibited. 

Monterey— Sea gulls and bluo oranos, killing of prohibited. Use 
of guns of larger caliber than 10-gauge prohibited. 

Santa Clara— Quail. Oct. 8 to Fob. 1. 

San Ma'.eo-Quail, Nov. 1 to Dec. 1. Rail, Oct. 15 to Nov. 15 
Shooting from boats at high tide prohibited. 



Noar Chico are a number of wooded lakes situated 
on the Parrott ranch. This section, according to O. 
A. Barham, is the homo of thousands of mallard 
ducks and the country adjacent to the water is a splen- 
did quail and snipe ground. 



10 



[January 18, 1902 



Steelhead Fishing. 

Reports from Russian river aro of much import to 
the stream anglers. The bar is still open and the river 
in splendid shape. It will now take some amount of 
rainfall to stop the fishing in tide water. Mr. Gibson 
caught seven fine fish last Saturday, eleven and three 
respectively on the days following. On Sunday, H. 
Battu caught two, Captain Watson four and Jack 
Sammi throe. Gibson's fish were taken in the big 
pool below the railroad bridge. Two of his fish weighed 
over twenty pounds each, one of them was a beautiful 
roe fish, brilliant in coloring, steelblue back and silver 
white belly and all the characteristic color and mark- 
ings of a coast steelhead in prime condition. These 
fish take the spoon and roe principally, many of those 
caught put up a good fight. 

The fact that a number of large fish caught recentlj 
in Russian river were sluggish as dishrags and, con 
trary to the general traditions of the river gave the 
fishermen but little battle, has been the source of much 
comment among the cognoscenti. These conditions 
were at first deemed local, but this theory is untenable 
as similar reports come from other localities. 

Two weeks ago Samuel A. Heller and Clarence Ash- 
land fished for twelve days at the mouth of the Gual- 
lalla. They caught 1200 pounds of steelhead as well 
as a number of salmon in that time. The trout ranged 
from ten to seventeen pounds in weight and among 
the fish taken a large number of them gave no more 
combat when hooked on a Heller double spoon than bo 
many old boots. This new phase of steelhead angling, 
we presume, will, for the present at least, fill another 
chapter in a large volume entitled "What Is Not 
Known About Fish." 

One day Heller landed ten fish making a total weight 
of 115 pounds. Several times during their sojourn at 
Guallalla, the fishermen found it necessary to dig a 
trench through the sandspit at the mouth of the 
river. The current and waves would soon enlarge the 
opening so that big fish could come in from the ocean 
and run up stream." 



Striped Bass Angling. 

Despite the many theories advanced by some of the 
salt water wiseacres there is yet considerable to be 
learned concerning the ways and habits of the striped 
bass. Various theories have been advocated as to why 
the bass are not caught at present in the bay waters. 
Notwithstanding the efforts of a number of skilled 
anglers, many recent trips to former favorite fishing 
grounds about the bay have resulted fruitlessly. 

A party of fishermen composed of Fred H. Bushntll, 
A. M. dimming, Harry B. Hosmer, W. F. Bogart, R. 
W. McFarland, Chas. Briedenstein, James Lynch and 
a friend fished in the waters of San Antonio and Black 
John sloughs on Sunday last. Briedenstein and L nch 
botli caught small fish, not over three or four poundg 
in weight. The others trolled tho Black John unavail- 
ingly. Ciunmiug and Bushnell remained on the 
ground, stopping over night at the Petaluma Gun 
Club house. 'On Monday they trolled San Antonio 
creok and caught ele vrn Bah aggregating sixty pounds 
in weight The largest fish scaled ten pounds. On 
this orcasion a pet theory of many bass fishermen was 
knocked into a cocked hat. When the tide was just 
right for an hour's fishing before and after low water 
they did not {jet a strike. Along about high tide they 
got into the fish and commenced to take them. They 
also had a number of strikes but failed to connect. At 
high water tho anglers changed light sinkers for 
heavier ones, so that the Wilson spoons could get 
almost on tho bottom. 

Near the Miratnonte Gun Club house, where the 
offal from ducks is thrown into a shallow slough, a ten 
pound bass was seen left in a shallow pond at low tide. 

Petaluma creek and its tributaries are destined 
apparently to become famous striped bass fishing 
grounds. 



Striped Bass Club. 

The annual banquet of the Striped Bass Club will 
take place on next Tuesday evening, January 21st. 
After the business meeting of the club a distribution 
of prizes and medals to various salt water anglers will 
take place. 

The roll of membership of this club of jolly good 
fellows is full and quite a number of other good fellows 
are on the waiting list. 



In Memoriam. 



The Coast depot of the U. M. C. Co., 425 Market 
street, is tastefully draped in mourning in memory of 
the president of the company. The following card, 
which is an eloquent tribute to a gentleman who evi- 
dently had the love and confidence of his business con- 
freres and employes, has been issued to the many 
friends of the corporation and its managers on the 
Pacific Coast: 

'•It is with deep regret we announce the 
death of our honored President, 

MR. MARCELLUS HARTLEY, 
which occurred in New York, January 8th. 1902. 

The death of Mr. Hartley closes a career 
of sarvice of unusual and rare value, during 
which the business in all its branches felt 
tl e influence of his strong and high-minded 
character. 

Union Metallic Cartridge Company. 

Remington arms Company. 
San Francisco, Cal." 



Hunting Notes. 

Duck hunting in almost every district within easy 
reach of San Francisco has been excellent for tho past 
week. The continuous dry weather has kept thousands 
of birds in the marshes of the bay counties, whore 
they not only find plenty of natural feed, but have 
recourse to hundreds of baited ponds. 

On the Suisun, Sonoma and Petaluma marshes, teal 
have been more numerous than any other variety, 
although there is found a fair sprinkling of canvas- 
back, mallard and sprigtail. 

Many of the ducks shot in the sloughs tributary to 
San Pablo and San Francisco baysarenow rather fishy 
in flavor. An easy way to determine whether a bird, 
killed adjacent to or on tide waters, is of good flavor, 
is to simply open its mouth. 

If one's nostrils are assailed by the odor of fish 
or clams, drop the bird — or take it home and give 
it to some fellow who has no claims upon you but 
has been persistently importuning for ducks ever since 
the season opened. If he doesn't know the difference, 
he feels elated and you'll have him on your staff next 
season. If he is experienced, he cannot do else than 
consider the matter as a hint that you are not a pur- 
veyor of game to everybody. 



In two weeks more the season on feathered game will 
close on ducks, quail, partridge, grouse, sage hen, rail, 
curlew, ibis and plover. English snipe, to the lasting 
shame of the game law tinkers who were responsible 
for the many juggling features of tho present game 
law, can be shot at any time of the year. 

These dainty birds breed in this State in many 
places. The Suisun marshes are a breeding ground 
for many of the birds. In the Klamath lake regions, 
the Big Meadows swamp and the Sierra valley the 
birds also resort for breeding. The fact that Sacra- 
mento sportsmen get most of their snipe shooting in 
March and April has been claimed by many sportsmen 
as one of tho principal reasons why there was no other 
protective provision in the present game statute than 
that of a limit on tho day's bag, twenty-five birds. 

In this respect we have heard tho statement, an 
abortive one at that, that the representative from tho 
Truckee region in the last Legislature was responsible 
for the omission of legislation for the better protection 
of English snipe. 

The past cold weather has not been favorable for 
snipe snooting, although some few bags have been 
shot. Otto Feudner and James Maynard, among 
others, have had some excellent snipe shooting on the 
Suisun marsh. Different members of the Country 
Club also get good bags on the Marin county snipe 
patches. 



Goose shooting will be in full swing as soon as the 
closo season on other game prevails. Geese are now 
very plentiful on the Solano plains. Several varieties 
of these birds are found in that district. Collectively 
they gather on that feeding ground in countless 
thousands. In the latter part of March and in April 
when the birds gather, ready for the annual northern 
migration they can be seen on the Colusa and Solano 
plains in millions. If a hunter can get in between two 
big bunches of geese when they are in flight he can 
get shooting until he is satiated with it. The first 
geese to arrive here get in generally late in August. 
After about April 25th following, the only geese that 
can be found in the sections frequented by them are 
the cripples who could not make the northern trip. 

Two varieties of the white goose frequent this state, 
the large ones and the smaller or barnacle goose. 
They are said to be good table birds; a favorite way 
of preparing them is to cut off the breasts and skin 
them, they are served broiled or stewed. In the 
spring these birds are not very good eating. 

The gray or mottled goose is our earliest visitor and 
the last to leave in the spring. The females of this 
variety have a breast of dirty gray color, the mottling 
which distinguishes the ganders is not conspicuous on 
tho females. 

The Canada or honker goose is our largest bird of 
the species. This variety starts off north early in the 
spring. The meat is somewhat dry and coarse, getting 
rank and fishy by spring time. 

The larger brant are similar in markings to tho 
honker. They are an esteemed table bird. 

The smaller brant, or "cling-cling, " as this goose is 
called by hunters, is of good and palatable flavor and 
is particularly notable by reason of its incessant cack- 
ling and ability to keep up a continuous noise and 
"talk" that once heard is not soon forgotten. 

These birds are nearly all easily stooled and work 
well to a good caller. The largo brant, however, are 
the most difficult for the caller to persuade in coming 
close enough for a shot. In foggy weather the white 
geese, in fact, all of them fly very low to the ground 
and are then easy to work. The white geese are the 
easiest birds to decoy. 

In goose shooting, the hunter will generally dig a 
pit on a known line of flight of the geese. Staked out 
on the ground nearby are his decoys; sometimes live 
birds are used and often dead geese are placed out and 
propped up so as to look like a flock of feeding birds. 
For night shooting, the hunter places newspaper, 
rolled or crumpled up, so that in the dark light the 
white objects are taken by the flying birds for their 
congeners. 

This season it was noticeable that the white geese 
arrived here much sooner than usual, arriving very 
early in September. 

Quail shooting has been but fair in many localities. 
Hunters out last Sunday found that the ground was so 
dry that it was difficult for the dogs to work. Mayor 
Johnson, of Monterey, is authority for the statement 
that this season there has been "quail by the million" 
in that county. Quail shooting of the very best has 
been indulged in by sportsmen who went but a short 
distance away from Monterey town. 



Jackson's Napa Soda untangles the feet. 



Field Trial Club Election. 



At the annual meeting of the Pacific Coast Field 
Trials Club, held at Santa Maria on Thursday night, 
the following officers were elected to serve for the 
ensuing year: President, Joseph E. Terry, of Sacra- 
mento; First Vico-President, W. W. Van Arsdale, 
of San Francisco; Second Vice-President, Henry W. 
Keller, of Santa Monica; Secretrry-Treasurer, Albert 
Betz, of San Francisco; Executive Committee— J. H. 
Schumacher, C. N. Post, W. S. Tevis, C. E. Worden, 
T. J. A. Tiedemann. It was decided to hold the next 
annual trials during the week beginning the second 
Monday in January, 190:i, on grounds to be selected 
by the Executive Committee later on. During the 
meeting the subject of permanent grounds came up 
for much discussion, and the Executive Committee 
was especially advised to try and procure such a pre 
serve before the next trials. F. J. Stone, G. H. Ander- 
son and R. L. Jones wore elected members of the club. 
A special vote of thanks was tendered to Judge John 
A. Balmer for his conscientious efforts and fair de- 
cisions in the trials just ended. No members' stake 
took place on Thursday, as the owners did not care to 
tax their dogs with a two hours' heat, which would 
have been necessary in that event. Instead, almost 
all of the sportsmen went hunting and fine bags of 
quail were the order of the day, as the country there 
is teeming with those game birds. 



Dangerous Shooting. 

The reckless use of rifles by many individuals has 
become lately a source of much complaint on the part 
of sportsmen who have been imperiled by the ubiquit- 
ous jackass who has no better sense than to shoot, 
with a high power or long range rifle, at any and all 
available targets in an open country, or on a marsh 
where duck hunters are located out of sight in blinds. 
A case in point happened near Sear's Point last Sun- 
day. One of the Honker Club members was in his 
blind on a slough and had his decoys placed out before 
him in tho water. Several shots struck near him, 
from what direction or by whom fired he was not able 
to ascertain. Upon picking up his decoys he found 
one of them perforated from end to end. The shooter 
had taken the decoys for live ducks and came near 
ending-a sportsman's life through his asinine careless- 
ness. 



At the Traps. 



The regular season will probably be opened again 
this year by the California Wing Club with a live bird 
shoot on or about the first Sunday in March. 



Ere many weeks have passed the blue rock season 
will be on again in full swing. Already the different 
clubs are taking active interest in preparation for the 

coming season. 



Rumor hath it that a shoot will be arranged at the 
Ingleside grounds for Saturday and Sunday, February 
21st and 22d. Weather permitting, the meeting should 
be a drawing card. 



The Ingleside trap shooting and live bird grounds 
will be open this season as usual and every inducement 
the Board of Managers can consistently make for the 
convenience and accommodation of shooters will be 

conceded. 



Jack Fanning kindly remembered us this week. We 
were agreeably surprised by the receipt, through the 
mail, of a handsomely illustrated calendar issued by 
an Eastern powder company with which he has been 
connected for severl years past. 



▲ consolidation of several gun clubs is under serious 
consideration by many shooters who have come to the 
conclusion that we have too many local organizations. 
This is the reason for too many conflicting interests. 
By coming together it is urged that expenses can be 
cut down and a more satisfactory program for the 
season can be carried out. 



Meetings of the Olympic, Lincoln, San Francisco 
and Empire Gun Clubs will be held very soon and 
action taken in regard to the trap season of 1902. 

Indications point to an active and enthusiastic inter- 
est in trap shooting this year by the Empire Gun 
Club. Tho club has a membership of sixty shooters. 
Besides the regular monthly shoots on the Alameda 
grounds last year the club pulled off several big special 
events that brought out the attendance of a large 
crowd of shooters. 



"I see that Armand De Courtieux was up at the 
club preserve shooting the other day," said Col. Ole 
Hossmer to Johnny Coleman one day this week. 
"Yes?" answered Coleman, "Did he bag anything?" 
"Bagged a pair of duck." 
"You don't tell me! Where'd he bag 'em?" 
"At the knee," said the Colonel, "They were duck 
pants." 



H. T. Dykman of New York, who now owns Coney 
2:02, believes the unsexed son of McKinney will again 
lower his record this year. During the past two years 
Coney's hind feet have been in bad shape, but Mr 
Dykman has them in good condition now and believes 
he can keep them so. The trouble, he believes, has 
been due to the fact that the extremely light shoes 
worn by Coney failed to give sufficient protection to 
the foot. 



January 18, 1902] 



11 



Breed to the Champion of the World 
McKINNEY 2:11 



BY ALCYONE; DAM ROSA 
SPRAGUE (grandani of Fereno 



McKINNEY 2:11 H 

SIRE OF 

Coney 2:02 

Jennie Mac 2:09 

Hazel Kinney 2:09^ 

Dr. Book 2:10 

Zolock -2:10% 

Zombro 2:11 

Charlie Mc 2:11V* 

You Bet 2:11k 

McZeus 1:13 

Osito 2:13V4 

Juliet D 2:13K 

McBriar 2:14 

Sweet Marie (mat) 2:14 

Harvey Mao 2:14Vi 

El Milagro 2:UH 

Sola 2:14M 

Geo. W. McKinney 2:14H 

McNally 2:15 

Monica 2:15 

McKinney at 14 years old 
has 

4 in the 2:10 list 
19 in the 2:15 list 
28 in the 2:20 list 
unequalled by any sire 
at the same age 

I ! 

Telephone: Green 393. 



1 

4 (3) 8:10X) i>y GOV. SPRAGUE 

By the percentage of his performances in the 2:15 and 2:20 lists he 
the Champion Sire of the World at any age. 

A Race Horse Himself. He started in 28 races, won 
25, was second twice and third ones. 

He is a Sire of Race Horses. Every one of his 

get in the 2:20 list secured their records in races and 
are all race winners. 

He ix the Champion in the Show Ring, Champion on the 
Race Track and Champion in the Stud. 

His get bring better prices than the get of anv other Stallion on 
this Coast. Nine sold in 1901 for from $1000 to J7500 each, an 
average of $3460 each, and $10,000 was refused for a young 
McKinney stallion. 

He is a Complete Outcross to all California Hares. 

In 1SXJ0 his get won first second and fourth money in the Pacific 
Breeders Futurity, first and second money in the Occidont 
Stake and first, second and third money in the Stanford Stake. 
The McKinneys are stake winners. 

WILL MAKE THE SEASON OF 1902 AT 

SAN JOSE RACE TRACK 

Beginning Feb. 1st until further notice. 

In ease of failure to 
get mare with foal she 
may be returned free in 1903 if I still own the horse. All bills 
must be paid before removal of mare. 
Good pasturage for mares at reasonable rates For further par- 
ticulars address 

C. A. DURFEE, 

8 Magnolia Ave , SAN JOSE, CAE. 



Terms for the Season, $100. 




NEIL W. 30371 

lty GUY WILKES, dam VERONICA 2:2» 
by Alcona 730: second dam, Fontana (dam of Silas 
Skinner 2:17, Flora Belle 2:25, etc.) by Almont 33; 
next dam Fanny Williams by Abdallah 15; 
next dam by Denmark, thoroughbred, 

WILL MAKE THE SEASON AT 

SANTA ROSA STABLES, 

SANTA BARBARA 



TERMS: $25 FOR THE SEASON. 



For particulars address 

H. F. R. VAIL, Santa Barbara. 

Return Privileges. 



SIDNEY DILLON 23157 

Sire of DOLLY DILLON 2:07 (the fastest mare of 1901), 
B. S. DILLON 2:25 and CAPTIVITY 2:28i/ s , 
Will make the Season of 1902 at 

SANTA ROSA STOCK FARM, SANTA ROSA, CAL. 

TERMS FOR THE SEASON, $35. 

SIDNEY DILLON was sired bv Sidney 2:19%; dam Venus (dam of Adonis 2-.IVA, Leah 2:24H, 
Cupid 2:18 (sire of Venus II. 2:11!4). Psyche 2:16"^ and Lottie Parks 2:16%, and she was also dam of 
Juno, the dam of Mercury 2:21 and Ida 2:30) by Venture 2:27H. sire of dam of Directum 2:04; second 
dam s. t. b. by Algerine, son of Whipple's Hambletonian. SIDNEY DILLON is a model of symmetry 
and imparts his grand individuality, inherent speed and excellent disposition to all his progeny 

Best of care given mares, but no responsibility for accidents or escapes. Usual return privileges 
if horse is still in my possession. 

For pasturage and other information regarding shipment of mares address 

FRANK TURNER, Superintendent Santa Rosa Stock Farm, 
Or PIERCE BROS., 728 Montgomery St., S. F. SANTA ROSA, CAL. 



$45,500 won 

WITH 

BALLISTITE 

at Hurlingham and the Gun Club, London, during 
the past season, in Plate, Prizes and Sweepstakes. 

" Ballistite heads the list of winnings of the twelve competing powders."— (From Sporting Goods 
Review, London). 

Loading; Instructions for Game, Target and Expert Pigeon loads and " Shooting Facts" 
mailed free on application. 

Cartridges loaded with Ballistite can be obtained from the leading Cartridge Companies, Gun 
and Ammunition Dealers. Ballistite is now put up in drums of assorted sizes to suit all demands. 

WRITE FOR PRICES TO THE SOLE AGENTS. 

J. H. LAU & CO. 



75 Chambers SI,, New York 

A postal brings " Shooting Facts. 



Importers and Dealers In Fire Arms, Ammnnltion and Fencing Goods. 



California State Agricultural Society, 

SACRAMENTO, CAL. 

SPECIAL HARNESS STALLION STAKE EOR 1905 

For the Get of Stallions that made Private or Public Service, 
Season of 1901, for their Foals of 1902. 

To Close Feb 15, 1902. 

The Race to be contested at State Fair at Sacramento 
in I905, when Foals are three years old 

Entrance fee for stallions to be the price that they made public service during the season of 1901. 
All other stallions that did not make public service, entrance fee to be $20. Stallions to bo named 
with the Secretary, February 15, 1902. 

All foals that are the get of any stallion entered in this stake to be eligible to be entered on June 
1,1903. Entrance fee $50 each, of which $5 must accompany the entry, with breeding and name, if 
any, of foal, and a further payment of $10 March 1 1904, and a further payment of $15 each May 1, 
1905, and a final payment of $20 on the first day of August, 1905, anil all colts making this payment 
•hall be eligible to start. Starters to be named in writing through the entry box 4 p. m. day before 
the race. 

The California State Agricultural Society to add an amount equal to all moneys paid in by the 
nominators of the stallions, not to exceed one thousand dollars. 

Entrance moneys paid in for stallions and added moneys shall be divided 60% to the end for 
trotting colts and 40°,; to the end for pacing colts. No nominator allowed to start more than one colt 
in either end. 

The nominator of any colts shall on May 1, 1905, then declare as to the trotting or pacing end he 
desires to start his colts. All moneys pa-id in on colts transferred to the pacing division shall be 
segregated and placed to the credit of the pacing stake, and all other payments shall be placed to the 
credit of the trotting stake. 

All payments not made as they become due declares entry out and releases subscriber from 
further liability. 

Hopples barred in both classes Mile heats, three in five. 

Nominator of the sires of the winning colts in each end to receive $250, to be deducted from the 
money added by the Society and the money paid in as entrance on stallions, balanoe of the stakes 
and added money to be divided 50, 25, 15 and 10%. 

Right reserved to declare two starters a walk-over, for stakes paid in only. 

When only two start they may contest for all entrance money paid in, not heretofore provided for, 
to be divided 66 s , per cent to the winner and S3 1 ;! percent to the second horse. A horse distancing the 
field in either class shall be entitled to all moneys paid in and 25% only of the money added by the 
Society, not heretofore provided for. 

Open to all stallions that have made private or public service in any of the following States: 
California, Oregon, Washington, Montana, Idaho, Colorado, Wyoming, Utah, Nevada and Arizona 
during the season of 1901. 

No entry will be accepted except under this condition: That all disputes that may arise in 
regard to the conditions or contest of this race, shall be settled by the Board of Directors of the Cali 
fornia State Agricultural Society, or those whom they may appoint, and their decision shall be final 



Remember the date of Closing for Stallions is FEBRUARY 15, 1902. 



GEO. W. JACKSON, 

Secretary. 

Office— New Favilon, Sacramento. 



A. B. SPRECKELS, 
President. 



The Thoroughbred Stallions 



SEASON OF 



Ossary 



\ Ormonde. 



1902. 

\ 



Ben d'Or. 



f Doncaster 
( Rouge Rose 



.Lily Ag;nes 



| Countesa Langden 



Kingcraft. 



r Macaroni 
Polly Agnes 



Tom 
oodcraf t 



Joysan . 



[ Adventurer 
( Lady Langden 

OSSARY will make the season of 1902 at the Menlo Stock Farm, San Mateo County, Cal., to 
approved mares only. He is a superb animal and undoubtedly the best son of Ormonde in the stud 
(barring, of course, Orme. to whom he yields nothing in appearance and pedigree). 

Terms and particulars on application. 



St. Carlo 



St. Blaise. 



Hermit ( Newmln.ter 

. Seclusion 

Fusee f Marsyas 

I Vesuvienne 



Kingfisher.. 



I Lexington 
Ethan Lass 



^ {^mn I i r 8ed 



ST. CARLO won the Great American at Brooklyn, the Foam Stakes at Coney Island, tho White 
Plains Handicap, was second to Chaos for the Futurity and won about $29,000 as a two-year-old He 
is a wonderful young Sire, among his get being Ruinart (winner of the Burns Handicap, Palaoe Hotel 
Handicap and $11,650), Zamar II (winner of 19 raoes as a two-year-old and $7695), Joan, February, St. 
Cuthbert, St. Calatini, Count of Flanders' Lord Marmion, May Boy, Our Climate, Glendinning and 
many others. 



TERMS FOR THE SEASON, 



$100. 



For further particulars in regard to above Stallions apply to 

james McDonnell, 

PORTOLA, San Mateo Co., Cal. 



The Highly Bred Stallion 

WILKES DIRECT 2:22! 

Full Brother to John A. McKerron 2:06 3-4 to Wagon. 

By NUTWOOD WILKES 2:16H, sire of John A. McKerron 2:06y, Who Is It 2:10«, 
Stanton Wilkes 2:10!4, Claudius 2:i3H, Georgie B 2:12H, Bob Ingersoll 2:141i and other 
standard performers. 

Dam Ingar (dam of John A McKerron 2:06*4, Wilkes Direct 2-.22Y, and Thursday 
2:24) by the old champion Director 2:17, sire of Directum 2:05^, Direct 2:05' 4, Direction 
2' 10M Evangeline 2:11^, Margaret S. 2:I2!4 and others; second dam Annie Titus (dam 
of Annie C. 2:25) by Echo 462, sire of Echora 2:23'/j (dam of Direct 2:05V4) and IB others 
in list; third dam Tiffany mare (dam of Gibraltar 2-.22Y,, sire of Our Dick 2: 10Ji, 
Homestake 2:14^ and others) by Owen Dale, son of Williamson's Belmont. 

Wll I/PQ niPPfT ls a d ark bayp 15-3 hands and weighs 1200 pounds; well 
WlLiVno LMIxEvI formed and of kind disposition Will make the season of 
1902 at the stables of T. W. Barstow on the Alameda Avenue 

Near Race Track, San Jose, Gal. 

FROM FEBRUARY 1st TO JUNE 1st. 

TERMS, - $40 THE SEASON. 

Good pasturage $3 per month. No wire fencing. Every care taken to prevent 
accidents or escapes, but no responsibility should any occur. Address 



T. W. 



Telephone No.: West 141. 



BARSTOW, 

San Jose, Cal. 




WILKES DIRECT 2:22 1=2. 

Full Brother to John A, McKerron 2:00 3-4. 



Annual Clearance sale 

Ladies' Suits, 

Cloaks, Jackets, 

Capes and Waists 

At Tremendous Reductions, 

J. O'BRIEN & CO. 

1144 Market Street. 



If we were a young man juBt starting in 
the stock business, either dairying or beef 
production, we would rather have $100 
invested in one thoroughbred cow than 
three scrubs at $33 each. It would take 
a little longer to get started, perhaps, but 
when once started it would be on the 
right, road to success. 



12 



[January 18, 19 



in 1900 
In the States 



Sheep Statistics. 

The expertB who figure out sheep statis- 
tics have evolved the following : The decks 
of the United States, exclusive of lambs 
under one year old, consist of 41,920,900 
sheep. The wool clip of 1901 comprises 
265 502,328 pounds, exclusive of the poUed 
wool, as against 259,972, 815 pounds in 1900, 
an increase of 2% per cent. The average 
weight of fleeces is this year 6.33 pounds, 
as compared with 6.46 pounds in 1900 an<l 
is the lowest average weight since 18.U. 
There is a reduction in the average shrink 
age of fleeces from 61 1 per cent 
to 60 6 per cent, in 1901. 
from which complete census returns have 
been received, the proportion of lambs last 
year to the ewes was about 66 per cent. 
This fact taken in connection with the 
relatively small increase in the total 
flocks 1,753,082 or less than \% percent, 
makes it clear that the amount of pulled 
wool produced must be large and 37,000, 
000 pounds is fixed as the probable quan- 
tity of pulled wool for a year, a total of 
about 8 000,0 JO pounds more than the 
estimates of last year. The total produc- 
tion of fleece and pulled wools in the 
grease is estimated at 303,502,328 pounds 
as against 288,636,621 pounds last year. 
The scoured product this year is estimated 
at 126,814,690 pounds, against 118.226,120 
pounds last year. The total scoured value 
of the clip is estimated at $51 164 



709. 



county's potato 
this year and 



TrottingHorses 

in being shipped about 
from place to place on a 
circuit, subject to all 
kinds of weather and 
consequent changes in 
temperature are very like- 
ly to fall sick, ehiU»,eolie, 
colds, pneumonia, <£•«., 
may take them at any time. 
Avoid trouble in time by having a supply of 

Turtle's Elixir 

ever ready to hand. It is invaluable in such 
cases and for hurts, bruises, splints, spavins, &c 
The best body and leg wash known. 

Used and Endorsed bv Adams Express Company. 

Turtle's Family Elixir ^.S^ 

Kills pain instantly. Our 100 page book' "Veter- 
inary Experience' 1 FREE. 
Tuttle's Elixir Co., 437 O'FantllSt., San Francisco, Cal. 

Beware of »o-caUe.i Elixira— none genuine bill Tullle's. 

Avoid all blisters ; they offer only temporary relief if any. 



Some of San Joaquin 
growers have made fortunes 
others have cleared up snug sums of 
money. Says the Stockton Mail: "O. Y. 
Woodward and H. Voorman have made 
between $75,000 and $100,000 each. Among 
those who have cleared thousands are the 
Ennis-Brown Company, which farmed 
part of the Sargent tract ; Wood, Curtis 
& Co. who had in a large acreage on Tyler 
Island; Frank Draper and Hickson & 
Long on the Bradford tract; O. E. Ander. 
s >n, Jake Sargent, Ralph Lane and George 
Thompson. A number of Chinese and 
Japanese also made large sums. "Potato 
Jim," who rents land six or seven miles 
northwest of Stockton, is thought to have 
cleared between $30,000 and $40,000. 
George Sliitna, a Japanese who has been 
farming in this county for years, will 
make about $40 000 after standing a loss 
of $12,000 caused by potatoes on Staten 
Island being Hooded." 

In straining milk use nothing but double 
cheeee cloth fastened over the top of the 
cans by cloth pins or by a rubber or steel 
band. The latter would be best because 
then the lid may be put on the can every 
time a pail has been emptied into it. 
Have a sufficient number so as to be able 
always to have clean ones ready for use, 
which have been rinsed with cold water 
immediately after using and then washed 
with warm water and soap, scalded or 
rather boiled and sun-dried. Keep 
strained cloths where they are free from 
exposure to dust. 




Percheron Stallions 



FOR SALE. 

Native Can foaled April 2S, 1897. He is a 
native ollll, handsome black with brown 
points and was sired by Raglan, 1st dam by 
Adolph, 2d dam by imp. Weinort, 3d dam by imp. 
French Spy. Native Son is one of the most prom- 
ising young draft stallions in California, and is 
a sure foal getter. He was bred to 23 mares last 
year and 21 of them are in foal. His six year 
old brother weighs 2060 pounds, and Native Son 
will be as large at the same age. 

Chief of Kneiphusen. JSMfflJ 

lion, bred by Joseph Blondin of Livermore, Ala- 
meda Co., was sired by Raglan. First dam by 
Starlight, 2d dam by Adolph, 3d dam by French 
Spy. Raglan No 14,739 was imported from France 
by Theo. Skillman. Raglan was bred by Joseph 
Davignon of Graucterie Department of Orue. 
Three of Raglan's colts were shown in Livermore 
on the 24th of February, 1900 and their average 
weight was 1856 pounds. Chief Kneiphusen was 
* foaled March ft, 18117, and took the first prize in the 
San Francisco and San Mateo Horse Show in 
Tanforan Park. He has been bred to 52 mares and 
got 48 in foal. His colts can be seen at Livermore 
and at Redwood City When he is full grown he 
will weigh over 2100 pounds. 
For further particulars apply to or address 

H. I '• GOECKEN, 

Hay, Grain and Feed Merchant, 
585-595 Fourth St., San Francisco. 



132,000 Deaths from 
this alone. 

One special danger menaces those who 
live well, who can use champagne and fine 
liquors, and that is Bright's Disease. 
Posted clubmen understand this so well 
that many have tests made every fow 
months Others drink nothing but dry 
wines. But still the deaths reported from 
Bright's Disease and Diabeies are increas- 
ing at a fearful rate The last census re- 
ports show that since 1890 the increase has 
been nearly fifty per cent and that the 
deaths in the United States alone from 
above causes and diseases growing out of 
them last year reached the enormous num- 
ber of 138.000, 

Hence the importance of every clubman 
knowing thisone fact, viz.: That Bright's 
Disease and Diabetes are now positively 
curable in about 87% of all case-. The 
Fulton Compounds are now saving the 
lives of hundreds, and will, when belter 
known, save the lives of thousands who 
are now with little hope 

Send for full descriptive pamphlets to 

John J. Fulton Co. 

420 Montgomery St , 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



THE OLD RELIABLE REMED 

For Spuvln», Klngbones Splints, Curbs, , 
, etc., oiui ull form* ol'LuniCDcas Is • 




NEVER FAILED. ,„ v 

Briston, Mont., Dec 12th. 1899. 

Gentlemen: — I will «ay that 1 h&ve used Kendall's Spavin 
Cure for tne last ton yeara as a liniment ; 1 have cured three 
bone spavins, one eurb snd one ringbone. I havt 
never falk-d to cure anything that 1 have tried. Pleaee 6od en- 
closed stamp for your "Treatise on the Horse and his Diseases/ 
Very truly youti, CLIFFORD SHELBY. 

Price s)l; «lxfor»>5. Asallnlmentforfamilyus* 
It has no equal. Ask your druggist for Kendall'* 
Spavin Cure, also "A Treatise ou the Horse," 
the bonk free, or address 

DR. B. J. KENDALL CO., ENOSBURQ FALLS, VT. 



Meet Your Friends 
at the Palace Hotel 

Tourists and Travelers who 
make the Palace their headquar- 
ters are surrounded with conve- 
niences and comforts such as are 
not obtainable in any other hotel 
in the West. Off the court are 
the grill rooms, telegraph and 
telephone offices, writing rooms, 
barber shop, billiard parlor, car- 
riage office, book stand and type- 
writer offices. 

On one side of this immense 
hotel — the largest in the world — 
is the wholesale and manufactur- 
ing district; on the other thea- 
tres, retail stores, clubs, railroad 
offices, banks and newspaper 
buildings. 

Street cars to all parts of the 
city — depots, ferries, Cliff House 
and parks — pass the entrance. 

American Plan. European Plan 



GRAND DISPOSAL SALE OF STANDARD 

Trotting: Brood IVIares 

PALO ALTO STOCK FARH 

On THURSDAY, January 30, 1902, at 11 a. m. 



FROM THE, 
CELEBRATED 



FOLLOWING IS THE LIST TO BE SOLD AT THIS AUCTION: 



Color 
& Sex 



NAME. 



Anselrna 3:29'4. 

Asombrosa 

Bell Bird 8:83. . . 
Cecino 



1X93. 
1885 
1894. 
1887 
1)897. 



Clarion 3:35 3 i 
Clarionette... 

Coralia 

Corsica 

Ella 2:39 

Elsie 

Giacinta 

Lady Agnes 

Lady Nutwo'd 2:34 

Ladywell 2: 1654 

Laura Drew 

Lena 

Lilly Thorn 

Morning Glory 

Nellie Benton 2:30. 

Ororose 

Sabling 

Sonoma 2:28 

Svlla liarnes 

U'lldmay 2:30 



SIRE. 



Ansel 2:20 

Azmoor 2:00% 

Electioneer 

Mendocino 2:19!4.. . 

Ansel 2:30 

Dexter Prince 

Boodle 2-1214 

Dexter Prince 

Electioneer 

General Benton. . . 
Guy Wilkes 2:1SJ<-. 

Electioneer 

Nutwood 2:185C.... 

Electioneer 

Artlmrton 

Dexter Prince 

Electioneer 

Electioneer 

General Benton 

Ora Wilkes 2:11 ... 
Guy Wilkes 2:15'^ 

Electioneer 

Whips 2:37'4 

Electioneer 



Zorilla 'Dexter Prince 



Elaine 3:20. . 

Ahwaga 

Beautiful Bells 2:29>4. 



Consolation 

Clarion 2:253£ 

Coral 2:1814 

by Corsicao 

Lady Ellen 2:29'4 
Elaine 2:s 



Stallion Bred to in 1901 



Moubells 2:23;4 

Mendocino 2: 1914 

Iran Alto2:12!4 

Exioneer 

Mendocino 2:1914 

Mendocino 2:19(4 

Monbells 2:2311 

Exioneer 

Nutwood Wilkes 2:1S'J 

McKinney 2:I1K 

Sproule ' Azmoor 2:20 l 4 



Lady Lowell. 

Lady Mae 

Lady Lowell . 
Molly Drew 2:; 
Lena R 



. Exioneer 
Mendocino 2:19<4 
Monbells 2:23' , 
.Mendocino 2:1914 
Mendocino 2:1914 

Lady Thorn Jr Exioneer 

Marti Exioneer 

Norma . Monbells 2:23^ 

Melrose Mendocino 2:1914 

Sablej Iran Alto 3:12* 

Sontag Mohawk Exioneer 

/fames Monbells 2:23'i 

May Nazote 2:2814 

Lilly Thorn Exioneer 



NAME. 



188.'. 

1898 

1899 



Azmoor 2:2054 

A 1 tower 

Menzie 



SIRE. 



Electioneer 

Altivo 2:1814 

Mendocino 2:1914 



DAM. 



Mamie C 

. Wildflower (2) 2:31 
Lizzie 



An Eastern Poland-China breeder says 
"As corn is high this reason I have been 
trying wheat as a hog feed. My first plan 
was to fcea it dry, but they ate it without 
chewing and it failed to digest. Then I 
tried it soaked and fed but this did not 
help matters much. Finally I ground it 
and made it into a thick slop. From this 
method of feeding my hogs have done un- 
usually well and I have realized much 
more than the market price for my 
wheat." 

A notable sale of live stock was made at 
Red Blurt' last month, when twenty one, 
two and three year old bulls were pur- 
chased for a large stock ranch in Shasta 
valley by F. E. Wadsworth. The bulls 
brought $3000, or $150 each An agent of 
Mr. Wadsworth has purchased 5000 steers 
paying $50 a head or $250,000 for the lot. 

Jackson's Napa Soda does not tangle 
the feet! 



FOR SALE. 

Full Brother to Listerine 2:13 1=2. 

Handsome bay three-year-old stallion, ideal con- 
formation for stock horse, inbred to Onward, who 
leads all stallions as a sire of 3:30,2:20 and 3:10 
performances. Just the blood needed to cross on 
| Pacific Coast bred mares Sired by Athadon 3:27, 
I world's yearling record at time (sire of Sue 2:1254. 
Listerine 2:1354, Dakon D., 2:16 at three years), 
grandson of Onward, out of the great broodmare 
Athalie, dam of Athanio 2:09^, and four others in 
2:30 list. 

Young stallion's dam is Lustrine (dam of Lister- 
ine 3:1354, Donnatrine, 3:26 three years, by Onward: 
second dam by Challenger, son of Almont: third 
dam by C. M Clay Jr.. fourth dam by Alexander's 
Abdallah. fifth dam by Herr's Coeur de Leon. 
Tabulate this pedigree, and where can you beat 
it? Will pay for himself first year in stud Address 
GEO. L. WARLOW, Fresno, Cal. 



Sale takes place at OCCIDENTAL HORSE EXCHANGE 

721 HOWARD ST., NEAR THIRD, SAN FRANCISCO. 

These mares can be seen at the farm until January 27 th, when thev will he at the Exchange 
Send at once for catalogue to 

WM. G. LAYNG, Live Stock Auctioneer. 

JUST ONE MORE GREAT SALE! 

Eighty Head of Stallions, Mares, Colts and Fillies, 

FROM THE 

SONOMA STOCK FARM, 

(ESTATE OF J. B. CHASE) 

TUESDAY, February 4, 1902, at 10 a. m. 

AT STOCK YARDS. 1732 MARKET ST., SAN FRANCISCO. 

M^ny Winners and Dams of Winners. 

All the great thoroughbred Brood Mares, including Marigold, Centella and other 
producers. Also, the stallion Dare by imp. Darebin out of Carrie C. by Monday. 
Twelve two-year-olds, eleven yearlings, bred in the purple, by producing sires and 
from producing dams. 



W. H. HORD. 



Live Stock Auctioneer, 

1733 Market Street, San Francisco 



BOUGHT, SOLD AND EXCHANGED. 

f\N HAND NOW AT PARKER'S RANCH, 
Lockefonl. San Joaquin County. 400 head of 
extra good Mules, from 3 to 8 years old, broken and 
unbroken, weighing from 900 to 130O pounds. Ad- 
dress A. F. ROOKER, 327 Sixth St., San Francisco. 

FOR SALE. 

pENT'S DRIVING MARE. AGE B: COLOR 
Brown: height 16 hands; weight 1 130: stand- 
ard bred: no mark: sired by Nushagak 25,9311 at 
McLaughlin Ranch, Los Banos: trotting gait: 
thoroughly broke, kind and gentle; can trot very 
fast. Apply to 

NEVADA STABLES, 
1360 Market St., S. F. 




M$TffiTffiTfflTsTbTtatteTO^ 



QUINNS OINTMENT 

FOR HORSES 



stands at the head of all veterinary remedies. Such troubles 
as Spavins, Curbs, Windpuffs, Splints, Bunches have no 
terrors for a horse if the master keeps and applies Quinn's Ointment. All | 
well known horsemen speak of it in the highest terms : 

[ler 4 Sibley of Franklin, Pa„ owners of St. Bel, brother of late Bel Boy, write, "We have 
(Joinn's Ointment with great success and believe it fulfills all claimed for it. We cheer- 
recommend it to our friends." For Curbs, Splints, Spavins or Bunches it has no equal. 

Price $l.oo per package. Sold by all druggists, or sent by mail. kllVfhii, 
W. B. EDDY S CO.. WHITEHALL, N. Y. 1 1 til I 



MJlle 
used t 
fully i 



P^H i otppc Tf\ hi 1 1 r ted and type wriUen rea r, dy for framing 

rCUI^rCCa I dUUiaiCU Write for prioes. Breeder and 
Sportsman, 36 Geary street, San Francisco, Cal. 



January 18, 1902] 



13 



HOLSTEIN CATTLE. 

SLEEPY HOLLOW RANCH. SAN ANSELMO, MARIN CO., CAL. 

I OFFER FOR SALE 

Johanna 5th's PAUL DEKOL 22372 H.F.H.P. 

His dam, Johanna 5lh. has official record at 4 years: milk 
89.3 lbs. one day, 10,180.5 lbs. one year: butter, 23.50 lbs. 
one week. His sire's dam, Duchess Clothil.de, lias official 
record: milk, 88.0 lbs. one day, 18,040!) lbs. one year: 
butter, 23.0") lbs. one week. H« was bred by Gillett & Son 
of Rosendale, Wis. His pedigree includes tbe greatest cows 
in the world. Having a number of bis daughters now in 
milk and many cows in calf to him, I let him go to make 
room for my otber seven premier sires. 

For further particulars address 

R. M. HOTALING. 




431 JackRon Street, Kan Francisco, * i 



Bonnie Direct 2:054 

World's Record for Pacers in Hrst 
Season's Campaign. 

Winner of fastest 5-heat race paced in 1900. Win- 
ner of Chamber of C-'mmerce Stake at Detroit: 
Blue Hill Stake at Readville, and three other 
great races. Biggest money winner of "New" 
Pacers of 1900, having $7,575 to hiscredit the first 
year out 

S:red by Direct 2:05.',. Sire of Directly 2:03]. 
Directum Kelly 2:08]. Etc. 

Dam BON BON" 2:16 (dam of Bonsilene S:UM), 
by Simmons 2:28, sire of Helen Simmons 2:11^, 
New York Central 8:13, etc. Also sire of dams of 
Owyhee 2:11. and Fereno 2:U)%. as a three-year- 
old, and winner of last season's (19U0) Kentucky 
Futurity 

Second Dam BONNIE WILKES 2:29, by George 
Wilkes 2:22. 

Third Dam BETTY VILEY, by Bob Johnson, 
thoroughbred son of Boston. 

ROXNIF DIRFCT is a black stallion, 15% hands high, weighs 1100 lbs. Is a good individual 
UUiiniU lmi\l,vi has best of feet and legs, and is absolutely sound in every way. 

BONNIE DIRECT will serve a limited number of approved mares during season of 1902, at *1 OO 
the season, with return privilege if mare proves not with foal, and horse is alive and in my possession. 
Money due at time of service or upon removal of mare. Every care taken to prevent accidents or 
escapes, but no responsibility should any occur. Pasturage for mares at reasonable rates. 




Address 



C. L. GRIFFITH, 



PleBBaEtOD, 'hi 



Fummsry of Three of r ormte 
Dirroi'e Races. 

Chamber of Commerce Stakes. $5,000, at Detroit 

Bonnie Direct 9 5 8 1 1 1 

Annie Thornton U 1 12 2 2 

Hal Me E wen 1 11 2 8 4dl-i 

Pussy Willow 8 3 11 3 3 ro 

George C. 3 4 3 4 5 ro Cobbett 4 7 4 5 dr, Duchess 
1 1 13 5 « dr, ,Ioe Wheeler 12 9 7 7 dr. Fred Wilton 
2 2 9 dK Mt Clemens Boy 5 6 6 dr, Louis E Mid- 
dleton fi 8 12 dr, Sport 7 10 io dr. Gamecock 10 12 
dr. Connie 13 dr, Little Frank dis. 

Time— *10H, 2:12^, 2:133s£, 2:13, 2:12M, 2:123£. 

2:13 Class, pacing, purse 11,500, at Columbus. 

Bonnie Direct. 2 5 111 

Johnny Agan I 1 2 2 3 

Lady Piper 3 2 3 4 2 

Freilmont 5 3 I 3 4 

Red Light 4 4 5 dr, Prince Exum dis. 

Time— 0:31. 1:02%. 1:31, 2:05^:0:33—, 1:05J4, l:38tf, 
-•: l<"4: 0:32, 1:0354, 1:34'4, 2:07^ ; 0:3l"/ 2 , l:04Vi. 1:37^, 
2:08%: 0:31^. 1:03%. 1:36, 2:08M- 

Blue Hill Stake, $3,000, at Readville. 

Bonnie Direct 1 1 1 

Sallie Hook 2 2 8 

Evolute 5 3 2 

Annie Thornton 4 4 3 

Paul Revere 3 5 4, Dark Wilkes 6 7 5, Tommy 
W. 7 6 7. Argo Director 8 8 6. Lady Allright 9 9 9, 
Beauty Spot dis, P. H. Flynn dis 

fime-2:07%. 2:09Si, 2:10tf. 



TRAIN YOUa HORSES 



AT NAPA TRACK. 



MO SAFER OR BETTER TRACK IN CALI- 
fornia on which to work and train horses. 
Large, roomy box stalls in Urst-class condition for 
rent at $2 per month. A reduction made in rental 
according to number of stalls taken. The best 
climate on earth. Miles of clean, dry roads to jog 
on during rainy season Transportation by car or 
boat to San Francisco. Hay and grain of best 
quality at low prices. Correspond with 

ARTHUR H. BROWN, Napa, Csl. 



CALIFORNIA 

Photo Engraving Company 

HIGH CLASS ART 
IN 

Ilalj Tones and Line Engraving 
Artistic Designing. 
513 Market Street, San Francisco 




The Fast and Game Race 
Horse 

REY DIRECT 2:10 

n.v Oil-. < t, 2:051. Sire of Directly 2:03], and 

25 >ith»TB in standard time. 
I)..., v,., : , (Dam of Rey Direct 2:10 and De 

Voras 2:11]) by Kentucky Volunteer. 

Will Make the Season of 1903 at 

LOS ANGELES 

T F IS MS FOR THE SEASON, SGO, 

Payable at lime of service, with return privilege. 
R y Din ct is as sure a foal getter as any horse in 



For tabulated pedigree and full particulars, address 



GEO. A. DAVIS, Pleasanton. Cal. 



Racing ! Racing! Racing! F,e:ttl Dm mill StatilOUS 



New California Jochv Club 

Season 1901-1902 

OAKLAND RACE TRACK 

Racing MONDAY, TUESDAY, WEDNESDAY 
THURSDAY, FRIDAY and SATURDAY 
BAIN OR SHINE. 
Five or More Itacea Kacli Day. 

Races start at 2:15 p. m. sharp 

Ferrv boats leave San Francisco at 12 m , 12:30. 
1:00, 1:30, 2:00. 3:00 p. m., connecting with trains 
stopping at the entrance to the track. Last two 
:arson train reserved for ladles and their escorts. 
>fo smoking Buy your ferry tickets to Shell 
Mound. All trains via Oakland mole connect with 
5an Pablo avenue electric cars at Seventh and 
(road way. Oakland: also all trains via Alameda 
nole connect with San Pablo avenue cars at 
•Yrarteenth and Broadway, Oakland These elec- 
rlc cars go direct to the track in fifteen minutes. 

Returning trains leave tbe track at 4:15 and 4:45 
i. m. and immediately after the last race. 



FOR SALE 

HI lTiO REGISTERED NO 9438. Weight 
iiuuij. )KV i : ,, n . (l bv j D Patterson. Oxnard, 
Cal: foaled April IS, INI8 Sire, Leopold 4250 by 
imp Louis 3.1HI- darn, Honrietta II 57*9 by Imp. 
Montchelle 3298; second dam, imp. Lady Henri- 
etta I 24 49 

REGISTER E D NO 90 1 7. 
Weight IWX); bred by J D. Pat- 
3n, Oxnard. Cal : foaled March 25, 1895, Sire, 
imp Montebelle 3298 by Ca;sar; dam imp. Maria 
I 2450 by Hercules. 

These Stallions are tlrstclass and their sires 
and dams are among the noted prize-winners in 
Europe. For price and further particulars ad 
dress AMERICAN BEET SUOAR CO., 123Cali- 
fornia Street, San Francisco. 



MARQUIS. 



High Class Saddle Horse 
FOR SALE. 

BAY GELDING, 6 YEARS OLD, ABOUT 1« 
hands, weighs about 1050 lbs. Stylish, hand 
some, perfectly gentle and perfectly gaited: can 
travol all day. Call or address, CAPT. MULL- 
DORFER, San Francisco Riding School, Pacific 
yvenue, near Polk. 



TIIOS H. WILLIAMS .lr , 
OH AS K. PRICE, Sec'y and Mgr 



Pres. 



J. GOLDSTEIN 
343 Third Street 

>AYS THE HIGHEST PRICES for Gentle 
men's good Cast-off Clothing. Give him a trial. 





Richelieu (afe rw* v T 



Junction . 



Sawyer Hoihe Bar, 

Cor. Oevisadero and Fulton Sts , S. F. 

D. LIEGINGER, - Prop. 

I I EAIXjUARTERS FOR HORSEMEN. THE 
1 1 place to slop on a drive lo the Park and Cliff 
Only the best brands uf Wines, Liquors and Cigars 
in stock 



ONE^SONE 



Tablet 




Pint 



LEG AND BODY WASH 



} LINIMENT. 



For Fevered Legs, inflamed tendons, 
sprained ankles, cracked heels and all skin 
eruptions. Will not blisteror affect the kidneys 
Unexcelled as a brace. 
The most effective, 
The most economical 
The most convenient 

One tablet fumishesmore genuine Witch Ha- 
zel than is contained in 40 gallons of the best 
extract, besides possessing other valuable in- 
gredients in its makeup. 

Put up in metal boxes in two sizes. 
Regular or $2 size contains 120 tablets. 6 
boxes for $10. Small or $1 size contains 
SO tablets. 6 boxes for $5. 

Sent post-paid on receipt of price. 
BOYCE TABLET CO., TERRE HAUTE, IND 

for sale by Druggists and Dealers in Harness & Turf Goods, 



BLAKE, M0FFITT & TOVVNE 



-DBAI.KHs IN 



55-67-59-61 Pirnt. Street, 8. V 

TKi,Ki>noNK Main 199. 

Chronic Bronchitis and Catarrh of the Bladder 

Cured In 48 Hours. 



i 



1 



CAPSULES 




Investigation brings Mani fold satisfaction. 
Learn of the penetrating, soothing, anti- 
septic and marvelous healing power of 

VETERINARY MINE. 

Chronic scratches, grease heel' that defied treat- 
ment for yoars. mud fever, hopple chafes, speed 
cracks, abscosses, inflammatory swellings, sting- 
ing, burning sores hoof rot, mange and all skin 
diseases absolutely cured, after every other known 
resouroe fails. Heals without scab, stimulates 
growth of hnir— natural color. There exists no 
remedy so all-powerful and unfailing. It is the 
one scientific, guaranteed veterinary ointment. 
Money back if it falls. 

2 oz , 25c; 8 oz., 50c; 5-lb. pkg., $4 

At all Druggists and Dealers, or gent prepaid 



A. W. HITT CO. 

PACIFIC COAST AGENTS, 

•*>n> Mission St., San Franelsco, Cal. 

Troy Chemical Co., Manufacturers, Troy, N. Y. 



Superior to Copaiba, Cubebs or Injection 



FIELD, 

HOG 

FENCE 



WIRE 



GOODS 

NETTING 

FENCING 



West Coast Wire and Iron Works 

17-10 Fremont St., San Francisco, Cal. 

COCOANUT OIL CAKE 

THE BEST FEED FOB 

STOCK, CHICKENS AND PIGS 

For sale in lots to lOlt by 

EL DORADO UNSEED OIL WORKS CO. 

OH California Street. San Fr»?.. l««-... Cal, 

T. E. ROCK 

MANIKAITIIHKH AND PKAI.KK IN 

Harness, Saddles, Blankets, Etc. 

Horse Hoots made to order. 

Track Work a specialty . . 
!il» Ellis St , bet. Mason and Taylor, S. F. 
•^Telephone: Folsom 2982. 



14 



1&he gveebev ant &p0vt*man 



[.January 18, 1802 




THE BAYWOOD STUD 

THE BUNGALOW, SAN MATEO, CAU 

(Property of John Parrott, Esq.) 

Devoted Exclusively to the Breeding and Training of 

High Stepping 
Hackney-Bred 
Harness Horses 



HERE'S ANOPPORTUMTY 



STANDARD BRED 
MARES AND FILLIES 

FROM $40 UP. 

Many of Them are Registered and Nearly All Can Be. 
Write for Prices and Particulars. 

The owner, HON. JESSE D. CARR, Salinas, wants to sell them immediately. 
Is not in need of the money, but is getting too old (87) to keep on breeding Horses. 
Will sell one or more and will give any one a big bargain that will take them all 
This is the best opportunity ever offered in California to get big values for money. 



Almeda C— Brown Ally, foaled January, 1893. 

Sire, Gabilan; dam, Emma. Registered in 

Vol. 13, Rule 7, as standard. Bred to Boodle Jr. 
Delight— Bay Ally, foaled February 15, 1897. Sire, 

Euglneer; dam, Flossie. No marks. Bred to 

Boodle Jr. 

Bertha— Dark brown mare. Sire, Carr's Mam- 
brlno; dam, Emma. Has not foaled yet. 

Bell*— Black Ally, foaled March 20, 1893. Sire, 
Alpheus Wilkes; dam, Lady Nelson. Bred to 
Boodle Jr. 

Trlx— Black Ally, foaled April 20, 1899. Sire, Ecce; 
dam, Belle. 

NeceMlty— Light bay Ally, foaled February 88, 

1897. Sire, Magenta; dam, Unique. 
Dora— Bay Ally, foaled April 2, 1890. Sire, Reno; 

dam, Martha. Bred to Major. 
Kpha— Bay Ally, foaled April 24. 1892. Sire, Eugi- 

neer; dam, Puss. Registered in Vol. XIII. 

Bred to Boodle Jr. 
EUle-Light bay Ally, foaled March 25, 1895. Sire. 

Boodle; dam, Mary C. Bred to Nutwood 

VTUkOBi 

Eda— Chestnut sorrel Ally, foaled April 19, 1895. 
Sire, Hambletonian Wilkes; dam, Gabilan 
Maid. Bred to Boodle Jr. 

Flossie— Brown mare. Sire, Carr's Mambrino; 
dam, Gray Eagle mare brought from Ken- 
tucky. Vol. XIII. Bred to Boodle Jr. 

Gabilan Girl— Brown Ally foaled April 8, 1892. 
Sire, Gabilan; dam, Clara. Vol. XIII. Bred 
to Major 

Queen Bets-Brown Ally, foaled April 3, 1900. 

Sire, Boodle Jr.; dam, Gabilan Girl. 
Little Ora— Brown Ally, foaled March 17, 1897 

Sire, Eugineer; dam Lilly B. 
Jane— Bay mare. Sire, Carr's Mambrino; dam 

Ballot Box. Bred to Major 
■Inanlta Bay Ally, foaled March 26, 1896. Sire, 

Bay Rum; dam Lucky Girl. Bred to Boodle Jr. 
ltty 8 — Sorrel Ally, foaled April 22, 1900. Sire, 

Nutwood Wilkes; dam, Flossie. 
Flora— Bay Ally, foaled February 24, 1892. Sire, 

Reno; dam, Lady Palmer. Bred to Major. 
Fanchon— Bay Ally, foaled April 13, 1898. Sire, 

Eoce; dam, Jane. 
Lady Palmer— Bay mare. Sire, Carr's Mam- 
brino; first dam by Luciona, he by Whipple 

Hambletonian. Vol. XIH , Rule, 7. Bred to 

Major. 

LUdlne-Bay filly, foaled March 28, 1894. Sire, 

Boodle; dam Gabilan Maid. Vol. XIII., Rule, 

VI. Bred to Nutwood Wilkes. 
Allegra— Bay filly, foaled April 27, 1899. Sire, 

Eooe; dam Jane. 
Martha— Bay mare. Sire, Mambrino Jr.; dam, 

Gabilan Maid. Bred to Major. 



Lilly B —Black mare (16 hands). Sire, Homer 

dam, Maggie Lee Registered as standard in 

Vol VI. Bred to Major 
Lucky Girl— Bay filly, foaled May 24, 1889 Sire, 

Carr's Mambrino; dam, Flossie. Bred to 

Boodle Jr. 

Miss Judy— Bay filly, foaled April 4, 1900. Sire, 

Boodle Jr.; dam, Jane. 
Nancy — Bay mare. Sire. Mambrino Jr.; dam, 

Gabilan Maid. Bred to Boodle Jr. 
Peerless— Bay Ally, foaled April 5. 1891. Sire, 

Gabilan; dam, Jane. Bred to Major. 
Comfort— Brown Ally, foaled May 25, 1898. Sire, 

Magenta; dam Janet. 
Surprise-Brown mare. Sire, Abbotsford, son of 

Woodford Mambrino; Arst dam. Minnie by 

Ladd's Kentucky Hunter. Bred to Boodle Jr. 
Sauaal Maid— Dark brown filly, foaled January 8. 

1892. Sire, Gabilan; dam, Flossie. Vol. XIII, 

Rule VI. Bred to Boodlo Jr. 
Taddle J.— Sorrel filly, foaled April 2, 1896 Sire, 

Bay Rum; dam, Mary C. Bred to Boodle Jr. 
Mary C— Bay mare, foaled April 8, 1898. Sire, 

Antevolo 7648; dam, Gabilan Maid. Bred to 

Boodle Jr. 

Ruby M.— Bay filly, foaled March 28, 1898. Sire, 

Ecce; dam, Flora. 
Jenny Wren— Bay filly, foaled April 21. 1900. 

Sire, Boodle Jr.; dam, Flora. 
Claire— Bay filly, foaled May 10. 1899. Sire, Punch; 

dam, Lady St. Clair 
Beatrice Golden— Chestnut sorrel filly, foaled 

April 20, 1900. Sire, Boodle Jr.: dam, Lady 

Comstock Jr. 
Ontario— Bay filly, foaled April 21, 1898. Sire, 

Magenta; dam, Luoky Girl. 
Miss Nobody— Gray filly, foaled March 26, 1897. 

Sire, Magenta; dam, Martha. 
Julia Dean— Bay filly, foaled April 13, 1898. Sire, 

Ecce; dam, Martha. 
Pobreclta— Black Ally, foaled April 9, 1900. Sire, 

Boodle Jr.; dam, Martha. 
Helen Gould— Bay filly, foaled March 29, 1900. 

Sire, Boodle Jr.; dam, Miss Beauty. 
Miss Nan— Dark gray filly, foaled March 6, 1897. 

Sire, Magenta; dam, Nancy. 
Delta— Dark bay Ally, foaled March 21, 1900. Sire, 

Boodle Jr.; dam, Nanoy. 
Queen Mab— Sorrel filly, foaled April 11, 1900. 

Sire, Nutwood Wilkes; dam, Nina B. 
Little Dorrlt— Gray filly, foaled March 14, 1897. 

Sire, Magenta; dam, Rita V. 
Adelaide— Dark gray filly, foaled February 20, 

1897. Sire, Magenta, dam, Surprise. 
Evening Star— Black filly, foaled March 28, 1898. 

Sire, Magenta; dam, Sausal Maid. 



Address JESSE D. CARR. Salinas, Gal. 



ASTHM A CUR E FREE! 

Asthmalene Brings [Instant Relief and Permanent 
Cure in All Cases. 
Sent Absolutely Free on Receipt of Postal. 



CHAINED t 

f OR. TEN 



There is nothing like Asthmalene. It brings 
instant relief, even in the worst cases. It cures 
when all else fails. 

The Rev. C. F. WELLS, of Villa Ridge, 111., says: "Your 
trial bottle of Asthmalene received in good condition. I can- 
not tell you how thankful I feel for the good derived from it. 
I was a slave, chained with putrid sore throat and asthma for 
ten years. I despaired of ever being cured. I saw your ad- 
vertisement for the cure of this dreadful and tormenting dis- 
ease, asthma, and thought you had overspoken yourselves, 
but resolved to give it a trial. To my astonishment the trial 
acted like a charm. Send me a full-size bottle " 

We want to send to every sufferer a trial treatment of 
Asthmalene, similar to the one that cured Mr. Wells. We'll 
send it by mail POSTPAID, ABSOLUTELY FREE OF 
CHARGE, to any sufferer who will write for it, even on a postal. Never mind, 
though you are despairing, however bad your case, Asthmalene will relieve and 
cure. The worse your case, the more glad we are to send it. Do not delay. 
Write at once, addressing DR. TAFT BROS.' MEDICINE CO., 79 East 130th St., 
N. Y. City. Sold by aUjDruggiats. 




VETERINARY. 



Ira Barker Dalziel 

VETERINARY DENTIST 

Fancy Cirriaie.Saddle and Road Horiei for Sale 

Office and stable: 006 Golden Gate Avenue, San 
Francisco, Cal. Telephone South 851. 



Dr. W rxx, F*. Ssan. 

M. R. C. V. S., F. E. V. M. S. 

VETERINARY SURGEON. 

Member of the Royal College of Veterinary 
Surgeons, England; Fellow of the Edinburg 
Veterinary Medical Society; Graduate of the New 
Veterinary College, Edinburgh; Veterinary Sur- 
geon to the S. F. Fire Department; Live Stock 
Inspe ctor forNew Zealand and Australian Coloniea 
at the port of San Francisco; Professor of Equine 
Medicine, Veterinary Surgery, Veterinary Depart- 
ment University of California: Ex-President of 
the California State Veterinary Medical Associa- 
tion; Veterinary Infirmary, Residence and Office, 
San Francisco Veterinary Hospital. 1117 Golden 
Gate Avenue, near Webster St., San Francisco: 
Telephone West 128. 



BREEDERS' DIRECTORY. 



HOLSTEINS— Winners of every 7 days' butter 
contest at State Fair 1899 1st & 2d for aged cows, 
4-yr., 3-yr. and 2-yr.-olds; 21 Jerseys and Durhams 
competing. 5th year my Holsteins have beaten 
Jerseys for butter. Stock for sale; also pigs. F. 
H. Burke, 636 Market St., S. F. 



TKKBA BUENA JERSEYS— The best A.J 
C. C. registered prize herd is owned by Henry 
Pierce, San Francisco. Animals for sale. 

JKRSETS, HO I.ST KI N » AND DURHAMS. 

Dairy Stock specially. Hogs, Poultry. Estab- 
lished 1876. William Niles & Co.. Los Angeles, 
Cal. 



AYRSHIRES— Young Bulls, Cows and Heifers. 
Registered. From prize winning families. 
SHORTHORNS— Of the famous Golden Drop 
family. All stock registered and sold on both 
blood lines and individuality. Brown & Brandon, 
Petaluma, Cal. 



SUNSET 
LIMITED 

One of the most magnificent 
trains ever built. For 1901-1902 
tri-weekly via Coast Line and 
Sunset Route for 

NEW ORLEANS and 
NEW YORK 

Leave SAN FRANCISCO -4:50 p m. 

Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays 

Leave LOS ANGELES 8:30 a, m 

Tuesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays 

Arrive NEW ORLEANS 7:20 p m. 
Thursdays, Saturdays. Mondays 



Among the world's noted High- 
ways of Travel not one equals 
the route of this train. 
Get the little book, "Wayside 
Notes," from any agent of the 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC 

Initial trip of Sunset Limited 
Friday, Dec. 6, from San Francisco 




Bursal Elargements, 
Stiff Joints, Arthritis, 
CURED 



Absorbing Jr. 



A pleasant Liniment to use, causing no 
inconvenience. $i .00 per bottle delivered. 

Describe your case fully. Special direc- 
tion, if needed, will be furnished free. 
Address 

W. F. YOUNG, P. D. F., 

SPRINGFIELD, - - MASS. 



For sale by Mack & Co., LangleyA Michaels Co., 
Redington & Co., J. O'Kane, and J. A. McKerron, 
all of San Francisco. 



BUSINESS COLLEGE 
24 Post Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

The oldest, the largest, the most popular com- 
mercial school on the Pacific Coast. 18,000 gradu- 
ates; % teachers: 60 typewriters; over 300 students 
annually plaeed in positions. Send for catalogue. 

E . P .HIALD, Praildan 



KENNEL ADVERTISEMENTS 

FOX TERRjERSJT STUD. 

VIRO Vi8to 

| Eggesford Dora 

Stud fee $10. 

WANDEE JESTER{SSS£J£f& 

Stud fee, J5. 

WANDEE BE BE {£33* AM™ 

Stud fee, $5. 

PUPPIES AND BROOD BITCHES FOR SALE 

For particulars address 

Wandee Kennels 

«44 HARRISON ST., S. F. 



(The World's Champion Bull Terrier) 

AT STUD 

L. A. KLEIN 

SS5TO Geary St., San Francisco. 



Apply to 



AT STUD 



CUBA OF KENWOOD 

(Glenbeigh Jr.— Stella) 
SAM'S BOW 
(Plain 8am— Dally Dee II) 

STOGKOALE KENNELS 

H. M. DODGE, Manager, 
Rakemfleld, Kern Co., 
Boarding. Pointer Puppies and well-broken 

Dogs for sale. 



Diseases 



Ho -w t 



o F* ood 



Mailed Free to any address by the 
author, H. Clay Glover, D. V. S., 
1278 Broadway, New York. 




D^-D0GSWnH MANGE 

jEJlO CURC THEM HTTJ1 M VNDAKDOIl Of I4B, 
«.T VNDARb DISIM I ( UM (O 



H. F. LORQUIN 



TAXIDERMIST 



Dealer in Naturalists' Supplies 

SCIENTIFIC MOUNTING OF BIRDS. RUGS, 
Heads, Animals, Fishes, Reptiles, Insects 
319 Kearny St. (upstairs) San Francisco. 
Phone, Black 5332 



15 Cents 



Send 15 cents in 2-cent postage stamps 
and secure a copy of our large 

Blue Ribbon Holiday Edition 

to be published Jan. 15, 1902. Thirty- 
six pages beautifully illustrated and 
replete with information. 
• l.oo will secure the large Blue Ribbon 
Holiday Edition and the weekly Spirit 
of the West one year. Address 

Spirit ol the West, Des rioines, Iowa V 




Coast Agents 

McMURRAY'S 
Sulkies, Carts and Speed Wagons 

WHEELS TO ORDER 

FOR SULKIES AND CARTS 
at S18, S21 and S2S per pair. 

Phone KENNEY BICYCLE CO., 

White 81 031 VaUncla St., San Franclioo 



JANUARY 18, 1902] 



15 



INTERESTING and VALUABLE 

HORSE BOOKS 

MAKE YOUR SELECTION. 

Any of the following Books will be sent Postpaid for the price named: 



THE PRACTICAL HORSE KEEPER 

By George Fleming, LL. D., F. R. C. V. s. 




A guide to those who have to do 
with horses, containing- chapters 
on Breeding-. Purchasing, Stable 
and Stabling, Feeding and Gen- 
eral Management, Riding, Hunt- 
ing, Breaking and Training, Har- 
ness and Driving, Shoeing and 
Diseases of the Foot, Injuries, 
Lameness, Diseases of the Horse, 
the Ass and Mule, etc. Bound 
in cloth. Size, 5£ x 7$ inches. 
90c. 




A SHORT HISTORY OF THE AMERICAN 
TROTTING AND PACING HORSE 

Henry T. Coates. 

The book, besides treating of 
Driving Horses, gives a con- 
densed history of the best horses 
in this country, with mention of 
their best performances. It is 
invaluable in its suggestions to 
horse trainers, and is the latest 
book on this subject published. 
Illustrated with 4 fine pictures. 
Size, 5\ x 1\ inches. Bound in 
cloth 90c 



AMERICAN 
PACING 

AND 
-TROTTING 

HORSE 



YOUATT ON THE HORSE 




The Horse. By Win Youatt. 

Together with a General 
History of the Horse and a 
Dissertation on the American 
Trotting Horse and an essay 
on the Ass and the Mule, by 
J. S. Skinner. With an en- 
graving on steel and 58 illus- 
trations on wood. Bound in 
full cloth. Size, 5J x 8J 
inches $1.15 



THE HORSE IN THE STABLE AND IN 
THE FIELD 



His management in health 
and disease. By J. H. Walsh, 
F. R. C S. (Stonehenge). 
Illustrated with over 80 en- 
gravings from photographs. 
Handsomely bound in cloth. 
Size, 5J x ~i inches $1.15 




DISEASES OF THE HORSE AND HOW TO 
TREAT THEM 

By Robert Chauner. 

New Edition and Concise Man- 
ual of Special Pathology for 
use of Horsemen, Farmers, 
Stock Raisers and Students of 
the Agricultural Colleges. 
Fully illustrated. Bound in 
cloth. Size, 51 x ^\ inches 
Cloth $1 25 




'"It is an unpretending treatise 
fri^e from technicalities, and well 
adapted for the use of farmers and 
stock raisers. The object of Dr. 
Chawner was to make a popular and 
reliauic uandbook in that department of veterinary science which 
treats of the horse and his diseases and in this object he has 
succeeded and supplied a practical want. There is no extraneous 
matter. Information is imparted with commendable brevity and 
in language plain and simple enough to be understood by all, The 
fallacies of the old school are rejected, and the treatment pre- 
scribed is that of modern practitiouors."— Turf, Field and Farm. 



THE AMERICAN 




GENTLEMAN'S STABLE 
GUIDE 

The American Gentleman's 
Stablo Guide, containing a de- 
scription of the American Sta- 
ble and Method of Feeding, 
Grooming and the general 
management of horses, to- 
gether with the directions for 
tho care of carriages, harness, 
etc. Fully illustrated. Pocket 
Edition. Size, 5x7 inches. 
Bound in cloth $1 .15 



"The book contains a familiar description of the American 
stable, the most approved method of feeding, grooming and general 
management of horses, together with directions for the care of 
carriages, harness, etc. The whole is founded on the careful study 
and experience of many years of the author's life, and forms a val- 
uable manual for any one who has charge of tho noblest of man's 
irrational servants Its low price and great value should give it 
general circulation among horsemen "—Indiana Farmer. 



HOSRE BREEDING RECOLLECTIONS 



By Count L,eliendorfT 



The Manager of the Govern- 
ment Stud of Germany, who 
has made a special study of 
the intricacies of horse breed- 
ing, and in the volume before 
us embodies the result of years 
of careful study. While all 
may not agreo with his con- 
clusions, none will dispute the 
value of his observations. 
Sizo, 5| x 8J inches Bound 
in full cloth $1.15 



" The recital of his experiences and the suggestions which ho 
furnishes will undoubtedly prove of value to all who aro interested 
In equine matters. Everyone so interested ought to own a copy of 
this valuable vado mecum." 




THE TROTTING HORSE OF AMERICA 

How to Train and Drive Him, with Reminiscences 
of the Trotting Turf. 

By Hiram Woodruff. 

Edited by Charles J. Foster. 
Including an Introductory 
Notice by George Wilkes and 
a Biographical Sketch by the 
Editor. With a steel portrait 
of the author and six engrav- 
ings on wood of celebrated 
trotters. 12mo. Size, 5J x 7J 
inches. Cloth, extra. .$1 .25 

' The author was one of the most 
noted horsemen of this country, and 
in the work before us has given 

— 1 1 1 11 "»■ to the public the best thoughts, 

founded on years of experience in the feeding, handling, breaking 
and training of colts with a view to securing their best perform- 
ances. Besides treating of driving horses, it gives a condensed 
history of the best horses in this country, with a mention of their 
best performances. It is invaluable in its suggestions to horse 
trainers, and its rules laid down and suggestions given are as good 
as the day they were written." 




BOOK OF THE FARM 

Or the Handy Book of Husbandry 

Containing Practical Infor- 
mation in regard to Buying 
or Leasing a Farm; Fences 
and Farm Buildings, Farm- 
ing Implements, Drainage, 
Plowing, Subsoiling, Manur- 
ing, Rotation of Crops, Care 
and Medical Treatment of 
the Cattle, Horses, Sheep, 
Swine and Poultry; Manage- 
ment of the Dairy; Useful 
Tables, etc. By George E. 
Waring Jr. of Ogden Farm, 
author of " Draining For 
Profit and For Health," etc. 
New edition, thoroughly revised by tho author. With 
100 illustrations. 12mo. Size, 5i x 7£ inches. 542 
pages. Cloth, extra $1.25 




" The farmer who wants to succeed in these days of busy compe- 
tition must do his farming in the most intelligent manner, and 
realize that the cultivation of the earth is a science as well as an 
industry. No farmer ought to be without this book, for it contains 
much that every farmer and his family need to know. It tells 
about buying a farm and gives ample directions al>out buildings, 
improvements and everything pertaining to the crops, tho farm 
animals and the management of the business."— Sunday Magazine. 



JERSEY, ALDERNEY AND GUERNSEY COWS 

By Willis P. Hazard. 

Their History, Nature and 
Management. Showing how 
to choose a good cow; how to 
feed, to manage, to milk and 
to breed to tho most profit. 
Edited from tho writings of 
Edward P. Fowler, George E. 
Waring Jr., Charles L. Sharp- 
less, Prof. John Gamgee, Fr. 
Guonon and othors. Illustrated 
with engravings and diagrams, 
etc. Bound in full cloth. Size, 
5$ x 8J inches $1.16 




BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, 36 GEARY ST., S. F. 



Pedigrees Tabulated, 

Stallion Cards and Folders, 

Stallion Service Books 
BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 36 GEARY ST., S. F. 



16 



[January 18, 190o 



7NE Harness 




San Francisco, Cal.^^® 




Walter Winans 



Vice President of the National 
Rifle Association of Qreat Britain 



makes the following statement in his recent book, 
"Art of Revolver Shooting." 




1 1 



The U. M. C. Co., Q. S. A., have supplied me with large quantities of 
gallery ammunition loaded with both round and semi-round bullets. 

These have a small charge of black powder, and I should prefer this 
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find it the most accurate for exhibition shooting. 

I think the U. M. C. gives slightly less recoil and fewer "unaccount- 
ables" than the English equivalent. 

They also load these cartridges with smokeless powder, which I have used and 
with which I have made my bests on record in the rapid fire competition. 

Send for new U. M. C. illustrated catalogues for further information concerning these modern 
Short Range or Gallery Cartridges, which are coming into wide use among 
experts and others. Game Laws and Shooting Records Free 

The UNION METALLIC CARTRIDGE CO. 




AGENCY: 
313 Broadway, N.Y. 



Bridgeport, Conn. 



DEPOT: 
485 Market St., S. F.,Cal 





Clabrough, Golcher & Co. 



NUMBER 5 RIFLE 

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I GUNS 

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Prank H. Hyde shot with a Remington-Lee Rille and won 
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Send for Catalogue describing same and Target Pistols, Shotguns, etc. 



REMINGTON ARMS GO. 



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PACIFIC COAST DEPOT: 

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Black Powder for Sporting and Blasting Purposes 

The Reputation of a Hundred Years is the Guarantee of 



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SMITH GUNS 

At the Cal. Inanimate Target Association 
May 25-26, 1901. 

71 Shooters, 20 used Smith Guns. 

There were 11 Individual Trophies offered. 
Shooters using SMITH GUNS captured 9. 
Coast Record made by Edward Schultz. 112 Straight. 

Edgar Forster, high average, 95%. Ed. Schultz and Otto Feudner, 92%. 
.Webb, 91i%. E. Feudner, 89}%. Varien, 88%. F. Feudner, 87}% 
Flickinger; 87%. Shields and McCutchan, 86}%, Williamson, 86%. 

They all shot L. C. Smith Guns. 

Catalogue on application to 

HUNTER ARMS CO., Fulton, N. T. 

H1L. B. HEKKABT CO., San FranoUco, Coaat BepreaentaUT*. 



*»-8end lor Catalogue 



538 MARKET STREET. S f 



The "Old Reliable" Parker 



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1900. 



1st— H. D. Bates, with 59 straight kills. 
2d— J. R. Malone, with 58 straight kills. 
3d— Phil Daly Jr., with 31 straight kills. 
All used the "Old Reliable." 




Also, as the official records show. 54 per cent of 
entire purse won with Parkers; 37.5 per cent of all the 
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You can get 'hese Smokeless Powders in 



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EDWARD SCHULTZ 

112 Straight Targets. 

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345 Straight Targets. 

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2 



[January 25, 1902 



Occident Stake of 1904. 



Secretary Geo. J"ack9on, of the State Agricultural 
Society, sends us the following list of the original 
entries in the Occident Stake of 1904. This stake 
closed January 2d with 84 entries, thirteen less than 
the stake of 1903, but this is accounted for by the fact 
that Palo Alto Stock Farm and others that have here- 
tofore been liberal patrons of the stake are retiring 
from breeding. Tho largest list of entries to the stake 
of 1904 was received from the well known Santa Rosa 
Stock Farm, which has twelve highly bred youngsters 
named: 

ORIGINAL ENTRIES OCCIDENT STAKE 1904. 

Geo. J. Morgan, br f Neergard by Neernut-Aleola. 

Alfred Solano, br f Mirasol by McKinnoy-El Mae. 

J. D. Rice, ch f Rose by Jody S.-Rackett. 

J. W. Minturn, b c Ramon by Toheran-Ramona; 
b c Strathcarma by Strathway-Carma; b f Ilderita by 
Ilderim-Porfection. 

Geo. T. Beckers, br c Gen. Chaffee by Stam B.- 
Whisper. 

E. Topham, br c Cliff T. by Alton B.-Blanche T. 
E. G. Bollinger, blk f by Direct-Nellie Bly. 

D. J. Desmond, b f Josephine by Neernut-Bonnie 
Red; b f Gerald ine by Zombro-Gipsy Girl. 

I. C. Mosher, b c Easter Aline by Coeur d'Alene- 
Allie Wagner. 

A. B. Spreckels, ch c by Dexter Prince-Galena; b c 
by Cupid-Erosine; ch f by Cupid-Countess. 

J. Martin, b c Jacka de Mart by James Madison- 
dam by Guy Wilkes. 

Tuttle Bros., b c by Altivo-Bello Medium; b c by 
Stam B. -Laurel. 

Thoma9 Smith, blk c by McKinney-Daisy S.; b c by 
Mambrino Chief-Hoover; b c by Tom Smith-Maud 
Washington. 

Geo. W. Ford, b c by Neernut-Dew Drop. 

R. Williams, blk c Rascal Jr. by Capt. Jones-Lena. 

La Siesta Ranch, b f Wanda II. by McKinney- 
Wanda. 

H. Williams, ch c Collis H. by Nutwood Wilkes-Net. 

Alex Brown, br f by McKinney-Francisca; ch c by 
Prince Ansel-Nosegay. 

Wm. Rourke, b f Ida Kinney by Stam B.-Hazel 
Kinney. 

Martin Carter, b f K. W. by Klatawah-Queen C; 
ch f M. M. by Nutwood Wilkes-Brown Eyes; gr f 
Grey Wilkes by Nutwood Wilkes-Little Witch; ch f 
Miss Carter by T. C. -Bessie. 

M. A. Murphy, b c Tho Only One by Lord Kitchner- 
Nellie Bly. 

Rosedale Stock Farm, b f by St. Whips-Fila D.; ch 
f by St. Whips-Dora. 

C. W. Main, b f Lady Luzella by Zorabro-Kate 
Hamilton. 

J. D. Carr, ch f Mamie D. by Nutwood Wilkes- 
Lildine; br f Esperanza by Boodle Jr. -Flossie; ch f 
Jessie D. by Boodle Jr.-Taddie J.; ch f Mercedes by 
Dictatus-Nina B. 

J. W. Gardner, br f by McKinney-Black Swan. 

H. W. Meek, b f by McKinney-Fennella. 

T. W. Barstow, b f True Heart by Wilkes Direct- 
Camma 

Mrs. S. V. Barstow, b f Sweet Alice by Wilkes 
Di rect-Ca maline. 

H. P. Moore, ch f Phu>be Wood by Boxwood-Etta 
Wood. 

J. Baker, b f Nut Bird by Neernut- Bird roe. 
John Rowen, b f Belle by Son of McKinney, dam by 
St. Nicholas. 

C. A. Durfce, blk c Almaden by Direct-Rose Mc- 
Kinney; b c Johnnie Mackenzie by MoKinney-Ferdi- 
nand. 

O. P. Willis, b f Excel by Arthur Holt-Jennie. 
C. Masoero, b f Yolanda by McKinney-Muscovita. 
J. Faris, Jr., b c Judge Biggs by Kobir, dam by 
Cupid. 

N. A. Eddy, f Edith C. by Col. K. R.-Rose. 

Vendome Stock Farm, blk c Marconi by Boodle- 
Much Better. 

W. R. Ruggles, b c by Stam B. -Elect. 

W. G. Durfee & Co., blk c by McKinney Babe; b c 
by Derecho-Lady Inca. 

C. K. Book, — by Zombro-Leonora. 

Oakwood Park Stock Farm, br f by Charles Derby- 
Naulahka; br f by Charies Derby-Lucy E.: b f by 
Direct-Betta II.; b f by Direct-Steinola; be by Charles 
Derby-Bertha. 

W. L. Spoor, b f by Neernut-Mabel McKinney 

E. A. Gammon, br f Easter Direct by Direct-Cleo G. 
Mrs. J. M. Lipson, b c Bartholdi by Zolock-Miss 

Gold Note; b f Zanetta by Gon'l Brierly-Zenade. 

W. Mastin, b c Marvin Wilkes by Don Marvin-Nora 

S. 

J. B. Iverson, b c Ivar by Dictatus-Ivoneer; b c 
Sigma by Dictatus-Wilhelmina. 

W. J. Fitzgerald, br f Kathleen by Mickey Free-dam 
by Son of Black Eagle. 

F. D. McGregor, b c by Cock Robin-Mabel. 

Santa Rosa Stock Farm, b f by McKinney-Bye Bye; 
b c by McKinney-Oharlotta Wilkes; blk c by McKin- 
ney-Biscara; b c by McKinney-Bonsaline; b c by Mc- 
Kinney-Stambouhtu; b f by McKinney-Buy-Guy; b c 
by McKinney-Roso Russell; b c by Sidney Dillon-Lilly 
Stanley; b f by McKinney-Adioo; b f by On Stanley- 
Silver Eye; b f by Sidney Dillon-Oakley Russell; br f 
by L. W. Russell-Helen Mack. 

Tho agreements for the two great matches between 
Boralmaand Lord Derby and Boralma and The Abbot 
have been signed and the first deposit of $5000 of the 
$20,000 wagered by each owner is up. May the horses 
go to the post in perfect condition, with track and 
weather the best, that the world's race record may be 
lowered. 

Don't forget to register your opinion of book making 
on harness racing with the State Agricultural Society. 
It will help to abolish this evil of the turf in California. 



Choice Mares to Nutwood Wilkes 2:16 1-2. 

Editor Breeder and Sportsman — Dear Sir: Be- 
low is a list of maros Palo Alto Stock Farm has booked 
to that great young sire Nutwood Wilkes 2:16A : 

1. Helena 2:11 J, dam of Wild Nutling (p) 2:11}. 

2. Expressive (3) 2: 1 2A, the greatest three year old 
ever trotted. 

3. Cressida (3) 2:18} by Palo Alto 2:08?-Clarabel 
(dam of 3 in 2:30) by Abdallah Star. 

4. Palita (2)2:16, the unbeaten two year old of 1895. 

5. Palatine (3) 2:18 by Palo Alto 2:08}-Elaine (dam 
of Iran Alto 2:12}). 

6. Wildmont (3) 2:273 (dam of Ardetta (3) 2:25) by 
Piedmont 2:171-Wildflower (2) 2:21. 

7. Liska (3) 2:28iJ (dam of Lunda 2:25J) by Elec- 
tioneer 125-Lizzie (dam of 3 in 2:30). 

8. Novelist (2) 2:27 by Norval 2:14J-Elsie (dam of 5 
in 2:30). 

9. Alula (half-sister to Ad vertiser 2:15}) by Altivo 
(4) 2:181-Lula Wilkes (dam of 3 in 2:30). 

10. Adbuta by Advertiser 2:15} -Bell's Beauty by 
Electricity 2:17:}, second dam Beautiful Bells. 

11. Suseraby McKinney 2:11}-Susette 2:23* (dam of 
Lord Stanley 2:281) by Electioneer 125. 

Yours truly, F. W. Covey. 

[Superintendent Covey is one of these progressive 
breeders who is always aiming to produco tho best and 
is contented with nothing else. This booking of 
eleven of the choicest matrons on the celebrated farm 
to Mr. Martin Carter's great young horse, sire of the 
champion John A. McKerron 2:06:) to wagon, and 
many others, is a master stroke. All these mares will 
be sent to tho Fasig-Tipton Old Glory sale at New 
York next winter with all the other horses on the 
farm at that time to be placed under the hammer. 
The fact that they will bo with foal to Nutwood Wilkes 
will add greatly to their valuo and attract many bid- 
ders who will want the Wilkos-Eloctioneer cross 
through such fashionable producing linos as these. 
This is a grand lot of mares to bo sent to the court of 
any stallion, and the selection of Nutwood Wilkes by 
such a progressive breeder as Superintendent Covey is 
indeed a compliment, though fully deserved by the 
performances of this son of Guy Wilkes on the track 
and in the stud. —Ed. B. &. S.] 

A Proposed Racing Ordinance. 

The following ordinance has been introduced in tho 
Board of Supervisors by member John A. Lynch. 
From the best information we can get. thero is little 
chance of this ordinance becoming a law: 

Be it ordained by the people of the city and county 
of San Francisco: 

Section 1. Ordinance No. 66, approved May 14, 
1900, is hereby amended to road as follows: 

Section 1. It shall be unlawful for any person or 
corporation owning, leasing or controlling any race 
track, to hold or conduct, or permit or suffer to be 
held or conducted, any horso race meetings, horse 
races or contests between horses, within the city and 
county of San Francisco, for any longer time or num- 
ber of days than the aggregate period of sixty (60) 
days in any one calendar year. 

Sec. 2. It shall be unlawful for any person or cor- 
poration in the city and county of San Francisco to 
sell or buy pools, or make books, or make any bet or 
wager in any system of registering bets or wagers 
wherein money, or other representative of value, or 
other articles of value are staked or pledged on races 
or other contests between horses except within the 
inclosure of a race track, and only upon horse races 
held within said inclosure and conducted within the 
limited period of sixty (00) days in any one calendar 
year, proscribed by section 1 hereof. 

Sec. 3. No person, otherwise competent as a witness, 
is disqualified from testifying as such concerning the 
offenses in this ordinance defined, on tho ground that 
such testimony may criminate such witness under the 
provisions of this ordinance, but no prosecution can 
afterward be had against such witness for any offense 
defined in this ordinance concerning which he testified. 

Sec. 4. Any person vioiating the provisions of this 
ordinance shall be guilty of a misdemeanor, and upon 
conviction thereof shall be punished by a fine not ex- 
ceeding $500 or by imprisonment not exceeding six 
months. 

Sec. 5. This ordinance shall tako effect immediately 
Getting Ready for the Blue Ribbon Sale. 

Palo Alto, Jan. 22, 1902. 

Editor Breeder and Sportsman — Dear Sir: 
The consignment from Palo Alto to tho Blue Ribbon 
Sale at Cleveland, May, 1902, are now being handled 
by Mr. James Thompson, trainer, formerly with Hon. 
L. U. Shippee of Stockton. 

Tho consignment consists of 48 two year olds, the 
entire crop of 1900 that are fit to go. They are the 
grandest lot of two year olds ever bred at Palo Altoi 
many well engaged in Eastern stakes. Full si=tors to 
Eleata (4) 2:08}, Lucrative 2:13.1; full brother to Azmon 
2:131; full sister to Carolita. Half brothers to Cecillian 

(2) 2:22, Expressive (3)2:121, Ned Thorn 2:llj; half 
sis*er to Freedom (1) 2:29}, Mendocino (3) 2:191, Bernal 
2:17; half brothers to Sweet Rose (1)2:251, Rowellan 

(3) 2:15}, L. 96, 2:161, Ardetta (3) 2:25; ha"lf sister to 
Adabella (2) 2:251, and many others of note. 

Yours truly, F. W. Covev. 



A Knock the-Knockers Club. 

Editor Breeder and Sportsman— I have been 
a resident of this city by the western ocean but a short 
time, but during my stay here have learned that there 
are a very large number of that pestiferous class called 
"knockers" among the horsemen. In trying to dis- 
pose of a horse that I came hero to sell I have run up 
against some of these knockers and find that they 
can be converted to boosters by a liberal application 
of greas6 to the palms of their bands. Not being in 
tho oil business I have been unable to supply the nec- 
essary grease, hence the knocking continues. Now I 
suggest the organization of a Knock-the Knockers 
Club, and that a meeting of horse owners be called at 
some convenient place forthwith. Every member will 
be required to take notes every time he hears a 
knocker at work and report tho same to the club. 
From that time forth every member will be required 
to knock the knocker whenever and wherever it is 
possible to hit him. There are several knockers in 
San Francisco whoso tongues are always wagging, but 
who are very tender and thin-skinned when a knock 
is aimed at them. They think it very cute to spoil a 
salo by insinuations and false statements, but when 
they feel tho tattoo that our club will beat on their 
anatomy they will imagine that they have awakened 
from a sleep in a boiler factory, and it is a two to one 
bet they will yell for mercy. It is the most effective 
way to cure this bad habit I know of. I hope every 
horseman who is notaknockor will begin knocking 
every knocker he hears knocking in the future. 

Yours truly, A Victim. 

San Francisco, Jan. 15, 1902. 



May Sue the N. T. A. 

The case of tho chestnut gelding Arch W., which 
was the subject of goneral discussion last spring, may 
bo aired in tho civil courts, the owner of the horse 
having last week instituted suit against the National 
Trotting Association, says 77/c Horse litriew. How ho 
will be able to get service on the officers of that organ- 
ization is a question. In one suit the court is asked to 
force the National Trotting Association to release the 
horse from suspension and reinstate him. The other 
asks damages in tho sum of $20,000 to reimburse the 
owner for the loss sustained during the past year by 
the enforced idleness of tho gelding through his sus- 
pension until all claims for illegally won money are 
paid. Opinion as to whether the National Trotting 
Association had jurisdiction in the case of Arch W. 
was quite equally divided last spring, when tho affair 
was so much comruent«-d upon, and if tho case ever 
comes to trial considerable interest will bo centred in 
tho case, and the judges' decision as to whether the 
parent association had jurisdiction in tho matter will 
be awaited with more than passing interest. 

No one will be interested in the $20,000 suit for dam- 
ages, it being preposterous to claim that Arch W.'s 
enforced idleness was worth anywhere near that 
amount. No court will attempt to placo the amount 
which a horso that did not race might have won had 
it been raced, and it is an open question whether Arch 
W. under any circumstances could have proven a win- 
ner in his class last year. On the other hand, the 
National Tro'.ting Association may have saved the 
owner monoy, such as entranco fees and shipping bilis, 
by keeping him off the turf. 



A Canard Refuted. 



Some evil minded person started the rumor a few 
weeks since that cases of glanders bad been found 
among the horses at the salesyard at 11th and Market 
streets in this city known as the Killip A Chase yard, 
and that the State Veterinarian had so reported. The 
following letter will show that tho report was as false 
as it was vindictive: 

Office State Veterinarian of the State of 
California. 

Sacramento, Jan. 20, 1901. 
To Fred H. Chase, San Francisco, Cal. Dear ofr: — 
In reply to your communication of oven date I will say 
in justice to all concerned that your horses are not 
suspected of being affected with any contagious or 
infectious disease, and that your stables located at 11th 
and Market streets, San Francisco, are not under 
quarantine or any other restrictions as far as this 
office is concerned. Yours truly, 

Charles H. Blemer 
State Veterinarian. 



G Peirano of Lodi, owner of that good looking 
stallion Alta Genoa by Dexter Prince, will make a 
season with the horse at Lodi this year at $30. Alta 
Genoa was much faster than his record and is proving 
a sire of size and good looks as well as speed, and many 
valuable colts by him are owned around Lodi. 



Strike! — if they don't give you Jackson's Napa Soda 



January 25, 1902] 



3 



Broodmare Sires. 



[Chicago Horseman, Jan. 14 J 
According to information secured by this paper thero 
were, in 1901, twenty-two stallions whose daughters 
produced five or more standard performers. Nutwood 
is again found at the head of the list, and again he is 
far in the lead with the enormous total of twenty-two 
representatives. He is followed by Onward, whose 
daughters have produced sixteen new performers, and 
by Red Wilkes, who is the sire of the dams of fourteen 
new ones. Runningdown through this list of stallions 
with five or more to their credit, the preponderance of 
Hambletonian blood in the male is astounding; it is 
remarkable that of twenty-two horses in the list only 
three do not trace to the hero of Chester. No less 
than seven are his sons, nine others are grandsons and 
three others are great grandsons, the three exceptions 
being Blue Bull, Kentucky Prince and Cyclone. 



Nutwood, by Belmont 22 

Onward, by George Wilkes 16 

Red Wilkes, by George Wilkes It 

Robert McGregor, by Major Edsall 9 

Strathmore, by Hambletonian 9 

Belmont, by Abdallah 15 9 

Blue Bull, by Prudeus Blue Bull 8 

Dictator, by Hambletonian 8 

Harold, by Hambletonian 8 

Kentucky Prince, by Clark Chief 8 

Egbert, by Hambletonian 7 

Electioneer, by Hambletonian 7 

Pilot Medium, by Happy Medium 7 

Adrian Wilkes, by George Wilkes 6 

George Wilkes, by Hambletonian 6 

Happy Medium, by Hambletonian 6 



many years as the champion broodmare sire. Other 
stallions whose daughters have produced one hundred 
or more are Almont, Strathmore, Red Wilkes, Ham- 
bletonian, Belmont and Electioneer. Another year 
should find Happy Medium, Harold, Daniel Lambert, 
Dictator and Onward in the same list. 

Stallions whose daughters The same stallions and UX6 
have produced 50 or more in the number produced by daughters 
list: I at the close of 1896: 

1— Nutwood 186 1— Mambrino Patchen 129 

2— George Wilkes 163 2— George Wilkes 120 

3— Blue Bull 162 | 3— Hambletonian 118 

■4— Mambrino Patchen 148 4— Blue Bull 107 

5— Almont 131 5— Almont 106 

6— Strathmore 129 6— Nutwood 99 

7— Red Wilkes 119 7— Daniel Lambert 74 

8— Hambletonian 10 118 8— Strathmore 73 

9— Belmont Ill 9— Belmont 71 

10— Electioneer 100 10— Volunteer 67 

11— Happy Medium 96 11 — Harold 67 

12— Harold 96 12— Dictator 61 

13— Daniel Lambert 96 13— Red Wilkes 59 

14— Dictator 95 14— Happy Medium 59 

15— Onward 92 15— Electioneer 56 

16— Kentucky Prince 84 16— Messenger Duroc 56 

17— Volunteer 76 17— Administrator 52 

18— Jay Gould 73 18— Kentucky Prince 50 

19— Robert McGregor 71 ] 19— Magna Charta 50 

20— Mambrino King 69 20— General Benton 49 

21— Messenger Duroc 68 21— C. M. Clay Jr., 22 49 

22— Administrator 66 22— Cuyler 47 

23— General Benton 66 23— Princeps 43 

24— Princeps 64 24— Onward 41 

25— Cuyler 58 25— Enfield 41 

26— C M Clay Jr., 22 55 26-Mambnno King 38 

27— Hambrino 55 27— Hambrino 35 

28— Magna Charta 55 28— Louis Napoleon 34 

29— Louis Napoleon .">() 29— Robert McGregor 33 

30— Egbert 50 30— Kgbert 20 

31— Enfield 50 31-Jay Gould 14 

To more plainly show the increase in the number of 
performers produced by the daughters of the leading 



Scion of the Royal Families. 

That well posted horse breed or, Samuel Gamble, has 
oftsn remarked in the writer's hearing: "If a breeder 
desires to succeed in producing harness horses that 
will sell for good prices in the markets he must get 
right up among the royal families of that breed." 
There was never a truer remark made and wo are 
pleased to see that Mr. Gamble has assumed tho man- 
agement of a young stallion that is one of tho bluest 
blooded of all tho royal lines — Stam B. 2:11), and will 
keep this grand race horse at Pleasanton during tho 
season of 1902. 

Stam B. is not only ono of the gamest and fastest 
trotters ever produced in California, but he is one of 
the handsomest stallions in America, losing- nothing in 
comparison with his great sire Stamboul, whose mag- 
nificent individuality won for him gold medals and 
blue ribbons whenever he met the best of America on 
tho tan bark of the National Horse Show. 

The dam of Stam B. is tho mare Belle Medium, 
whose trotting record is 2:20, and whose sire is that 
groat son of Hambletonian, Happy Medium, that sired 
the trotting queen Nancy Hanks 2:04, dam of that 
splendid three year old Admiral Dewey that took a 
record of 2:14] last year. Belle Medium is ono of the 
handsomest marcs in California to-day and it is no 
wonder that Stam B.'s colts have so much of this very 
desirable and necessary quality, as it would be difficult 




Bourbon Wilkes, by George Wilkes 5 

Chimes, by Electioneer ™ 

Cyclone, by Caliban |? 

Director, bv Dictator •? 

Gambetta Wilkes, by George Wilkes j> 

Mambrino Startle, by Startle 5 

Along the line of last week's table, which showed 
the one hundred leading sires of standard performers, 
there is presented below the list of stallions that have 
sired the dams of fifty or more performers and as a 
comparison there is given the same table as it stood at 
the close of 1896. In the table for 1901 it will be seen 
that there are ten stallions which have sired tho dams 
of one hundred or more, which is one more than the 
total number which have sired one hundred or more 
performers themselves. Nutwood, Red Wilkes and 
Electioneer have each sired one hundred or more, and 
sired the dams of 100 or more performers in the list- 
With 186 to his credit, Nutwood has taken a long lead 
as the greatest sire of dams. Only fourteen more 
additions during the coming season will make his total 
two hundred, and as he secured more than that num- 
ber in each of the last five years the chances are that 
he will pass the mark before another campaign shall 
have been ended. George Wilkes stands second in the 
list with a total of 163. Blue Bull, whose daughters 
have been producing standard performers at the rate 
of from eight to ten every year for the past six or 
seven seasons, is a close third, while quite a distance in 
the rear comes Mambrino Patchen, who reigned for so 



NUTWOOD 2:18 3-4-. 

broodmare sires, there is presented a third table below. 
It shows the total number of performers produced from 
1896 to the close of 1901. During those years Nutwood 
sired the dams of no less than eighty-seven trotters 
and pacers. Ho is followed by Red Wilkes, who has 
sixty. A stallion that occupies third position, leaving 
such noted sires of dams as Strathmore, Blue Bull, 
Onward, Electioneer, George Wilkes, Belmont and 
others behind, is Jay Gould, a horse that has seldom 
if ever, been referred to as a groat broodmare sire. 
At the close of 1896, his daughters had produced but 
fourteen performers; now they have to their credit a 
total of seventy-three, making fifty-nine that he 
secured from 1896 to tho close of 1901. 

Total number produced by daughters from 1896 to and including 
1901: 



Nutwood 87 

Red Wilkes 80 

Jay Gould »9 

Stfalhmore 56 

Blue Bull » 

Onward *>' 

Electioneer 44 

George Wilkes 48 

Belmont *» 

Robert McGregor 88 

Happy Medium 37 

Dictator . . ! 84 

Kentucky Prince 34 

Mambrino King 



Egbert 



an 



Harold.. 29 



Almont 25 

Daulel Lambert 22 

Princeps 21 

Hambrino 20 

Mambrino Patchen 19 

Gen. Benton 17 

Louis Napoleon 16 

Administrator 14 

Messenger Duroc 12 

Cuyler 11 

■Volunteer 9 

Enfield 9 

Hambletonian 6 

C. M. Clay « 

Magna Charta 5 



Like all good things, Jackson's Napa Soda hasa 
dozen counterfeits. Watch out ! 



to find two handsomer representatives than his sire 
and dam. 

Tho second dam of Stam 13 is Argon ta, a producing 
mare by Almont Lightning, a stallion that was not 
only a handsome horse, but was considered by Genorai 
Withers, his breeder, to he one of the best colts 
Almont ever sired. Hon. H. J. Jewott paid $10,000 
for Almont Lightning but tho horse died before reach- 
ing tho ago of eight years, leaving very few foals. 

Mary Adams, the third dam of Stam B. was a 
daughter of that great broodmare sire Mambrino 
Pat oh en, his fourth dam was by tho great Mambrino 
Chiof II, fifth dam by Mason's Whip, a son of tho 
noted Blaokburn'a Whip one of the great thorough- 
breds of his day whose blood is found in the veins of 
many of tho fastest modern trotters. 

Stam B. is surely destined to bo a great sire of speed, 
high action and extremo beauty. He imparts those 
qualities to all his got without exception. As a race 
horse he had few equals. He and his rival ZombrO 
were the greatest three yoar old trotters of 189f> in tho 
United States. Stam B. during his racing career 
started in 21 races, was first 10 times, second 6 times, 
and third 5 times, thus never being fourth or unplaced. 
Ho won $75,000 in purses and was ono of tho gamest of 
tho game. Those breeders who admire handsome 
carriage, good looks and size as well as speed can find 
no better stallion to mato their mares with than this 
son of tho now deceased Stamboul, champion of tho 
track and show ring. 



4 



[January 25, 1902 



Notes and News, d 




Gazelle 2:11^ (dam of Zolock 2:10}) is in foal to 
Council Chimes 2:071. 

The English Army requires between 18,000 and 19,- 
000 horses in time of peace. 



Get one of those Palo Alto broodmares and breed 
her to some good stallion every year. There is money 
in it. 

Some talk is hoard now and then about matching 
Anaconda 2:01 J against Prince Alert 2:00$ the coming 
year. 

Nominate your stallion in the California State Agri- 
cultural Society's Special Harness Stallion Stake for 
1905. 

Zombro 2:11 will have a full book at Los Angeles. 
His services there will be limited, as he goes to Oregon, 
Juno 1st. 

The two minute trotter will have to go forty-four 
feet every second. Cresceus went 43.108 feet a second 
in his record mile. 

Thero is no need of your horse suffering with 
scratches or cracked heels. Veterinary Pixine will 
cure them every time. 

Andy Welch is out after the Lord Derby-Boralma 
match, and says he will give as much as any other 
track to secure the race. 



A $10,000 event for trotters and one of $5000 for 
pacers are liable to be found on Cleveland's Grand Cir- 
cuit program for this year. 



Lucille 2:07, the champion wagon mare, is jogging 
sound at Memphis, and has apparently recovered from 
the injury received last summer. 



Several extra good looking roadsters will be sold at 
the administrator's sale of the late J. B. Chase's horses 
at 1732 Market street February 4th. 



Don't forget thedate of the Palo Altosaleof stallions 
and broodmares at the Occidental Horse Exchange. 
It is Thursday next, January 30th. The horses will 
be at the yard on Monday for inspection. 



It is rumored about New York that a raatineo racing 
club will be formed in that city next month on the 
plan of the famous club at Cleveland. The more clubs 
of this sort the better. San Francisco should have 
one. 

A. J. Eeok, of Syracuse, N. Y., has sold to A. H. 
Miller, of Buffalo, the bay trotting mare Bed Princess 
2:121 for $3000. She will be entered liberally in the 
big stake events the season of 1902. She has shown 
three heats better than 2:15. 



Five of the greatest pacers of 1 90 1, Conev 2:02, Dan 
Patch 2:04.i, Royal R. Sheldon 2:04i{, Aud'ubon Boy 
2:00 and Charley Hayt 2:06}, have double or treble 
crosses to George Wilkes. This speaks volumes for 
Wilkes blood and for judicious breeding. 



D. L. Crane, the well known horseshoer, formerly 
of Sacramento, is now located at Los Angeles. Mr. 
Crane has shod as many trotters and pacers on the 
California circuit during the past few years as any 
man, and the horsemen all speak highly of his work. 



Here is one of tho stories that is starting about once 
a week on the Hot Air circuit: "It is said that Ed 
Geers has purchased a mule with which he expects to 
win tho next Transmulia Stake at Memphis, Tenn. 
It is said that the mule stepped a mile the third of 
January in 2:47ij." 

When Cresceus stepped the Dallas, Tex., track in 
2:07', on New Year's Day, he recorded his twenty-third 
mile of the season bettor than 2:10, two of these miles 
having been trotted over half-mile tracks. It was the 
fastest mile ever trotted in January, and the last quar- 
ter was trotted in 294 seconds 



Only three trotters acquired world's records in 1901, 
a stallion, a gelding and a mare. Cresceus reduced 
the trotting record from 2:03} to 2:02}, Peter Stirling 
lowered the record for geldings three years old from 
2:12 to 2:114 and Janice trotted a mile and one-eighth 
in 2:24, the'record for that distance. 



G. C. Owens, who has been located at the Concord, 
Contra Costa county, racetrack since last fall, and is 
handling a few trotters and pacers for different owners, 
has a high opinion of tho Sidney stallion Sidmore 
2:174, sire of Teddy the Roan 2:174, Little Miss 2:174, 
General 2:14} and others, that i9 owned in that county. 
Mr. Owens drove Sid more a public trial at the Con- 
cord fair last year, an-* although the horse was not in 
condition for a full mile at his best speed, turned the 
track in 2:171, going the first half in 1:11 and the last 
quarter in 30 seconds. 



Dan Misner has a colt by Meridian 2:121 la hi 8 string 
and is jogging him on the park roads preparatory to 
training for the circuit. This is the first of Meridian's 
get to bo trained, but there are more coming and they 
will get raco records as soon as they are old enough to 
race, as they are fast. 

The Eastern Grand Circuit dates will be fixed at a 
meeting to be held at Detroit next Tuesday. The 
Detroit Club desires to open the circuit as usual, but 
asks that its date be put one week later than last 
season. There are fourteen associations asking for a 
place in "the big ring." 



Hart Boswell's fee this year will be $50 insteal of $30 
as the types made us say last week. 



Pique, at the age of thirteen, is the dam of Chain 
Shot 2:004, Brash 2:15} and Deputize 2:22}. 

Pittsburg will have a horse show this year, and $25,- 
000 has already been subscribed for that purpose. 



Thos. S. Griffith, who is now nicely located at 
Seattle's new race track, where his horses are all doing 
well. There will bo a four day's meeting at Seattle in 
June or July and one in Octobe.'. Mr. Griffith says 
ho expects to win a raco or two there with his green 
mare Guysome by Hammer. 



James Thompson is at Palo Alto Stock Farm at 
work on the trotting colts that are being prepared for 
the big sale at Cleveland in May. Superintendent 
Covey is confident that this, the last consignment of 
youngsters from Palo Alto to the salesring, will be the 
choisest lot ever 9ent across the mountains. 



Arthur Brown, lessee of the Napa race track, put 
men to work on tho track last Monday and will soon 
have it in good condition for training horses over. 
The track is being plowed up and will be harrowed, 
leveled and worked until its condition is as near perfect 
as possible. It will be one of the best tracks in the 
State to train horses on. 



A well hred three year old bay colt by Diawood 2:11 
is advertised for sale in this issue. His dam is by 
Wilkosdale 2:29, a well bred son of Alcantara; second 
dam by Calabar 8059, son of Guy Wilkes; third dam 
Madam Wilson by John Nelson. This is as rich breed- 
ing as '.here is in the books and as the colt is a good 
individual he should be worth all the money the owner 
asks for him. 

Who will buy Bell Bird 2:22, daughter of Electioneer 
and Beautiful Bells? She is to be sold at tho Occiden- 
tal Horse Exchange January 30th, which is Thursday 
next, and as she is a full sister to Hinda Rose 2:194, 
Alta Belle 2:231, St. Bel 2:244, Chimes 2:30} the great 
sire, Bell Boy 2:19}, Bow Bells 2:19}, Bellflower 2:12| 
and Belsire 2:214 and but twelve years old, should bo 
worth a lot of money. 



Inquiries for good horses for road and park purposes 
are numerous. No loss than four ad vertisements of 
horses wanted are in our advertising columns this 
week. A pair of mares is wanted by one, a d riving 
mare by another, a singlo footer by still another, and 
a gentleman's driving horse that can show better than 
a 2:30 gait is desired by still another. Some of our 
readers should be able to supply these wants. 



Tho annual meeting of the Directors of the Northern 
New York Trotting Horse Breeders Association was 
held at Glens Falls on January 13th. C. W. Cool was 
elected President, F. W. Bentley, Secretary, and W 
I. Grilling Treasurer. The association will apply for 
dates on the Grand Circuit this year. All the Califor- 
nia horsemen who have raced at Glens Falls speak in 
the very highest terms of tho management and of tho 
track. 

Azmoor 2:20.1 by Electioneer out of Mamie C , clam 
of three in tho 2:30 list, by the thoroughbred horse 
imp. Hercules, is to bo sold at the Palo Alto sale next 
Thursday Azmoor is twenty years old, but a sound 
and vigorous horso and would have large earning 
capacity in proper hands. He has sired a number of 
good race horses, among them the horse Betonica that 
took a record of 2:104. and paced a public trial at tho 
Santa Ana fair in 2:0t"iJ. 



Mr. E. D. Dudley, of Dixon, writes us that his bay 
mare, Bee by Sterling out of Flash by Egmont, is the 
dam of Monroe B. 2:19}, which will give Mary by Flax- 
tail another descendant in the standard list, as Ster- 
ling is one of her sons. The record of Monroe B. was 
made at the State Fair last year in a race for members 
of the Sacramento Driving Club. Ho won the second, 
third and fourth heats getting his record in the 
second. 

Thomas Charlton of Ukiah has sold his trotter 
Black Bart 2:17} to William Andrews of Iowa. Tho 
horse was shipped to this city this week and will be 
sent from here to the home of the purchaser in a few 
days. Black Bart was on tho California circuit last 
year, starting as a green horse. Out of six starts ho 
won four first moneys, was fourth once and behind the 
money once. He is a good looking horse and a good 
prospect for a 2:10 trotter. 

Little Tobe, a 14 hand trotter by Pimlico 2:10, was 
one of the handsomest little horses ever seen on a race 
track. He could s ep like a drum major and lift his 
knees as high as any horse. He sacrificed his tail to 
the demand of fashion an 1 was placed in the New 
York Horse Show, where he won second to T. W. 
Lawson's Glorious Bonnie, another trotting bred high 
stepper. Vivian Gooch of Windsor, England, paid 
$4000 for Little Tobe and will take him home with him. 



It is with regret that wo chronicle tho death of Mr. 
Frank P. Lowell, who passed away after a lingering 
illness and much suffering on tho 15th of this month 
at his home in Oakland. Mr. Lowell at one time was 
quite an extensive breeder of trotting horses, having 
owned the stallion Don Marvin and other well bred 
ones. He had been an invalid for years prior to his 
death. Mi - . Lowell was an upright, honorable man in 
all his dealings and leaves many friends to mourn his 
loss. 



If some millionaire would but essay to get the world's 
polo record to sensational figures it would have a 
splendid effect in many ways. It has been 2:12} since 
1892, and no really first class pair of race trotters have 
ever been tried as a team regularly. A man who 
organizes a 2:10 or 2:09 team of trotters can readiiy 
engage them after they were to show high form. 
Teamwork ever appeals to the wealthy, and invariably 
interests tho more humble enthusiasts.— Exvhumie. 

I have been told that Mr. E. Smathers intends 
starting his $10,500 purchase, Lord Derby 2:004, in the 
matinee races, and has determined to try his "hand at 
bringing tho Boston Cup to Now York. At a meoting 
of a part of tho Road Drivers' Association directors, 
held at tho Rossmore, it was decided to hold a public 
meeting within two weeks to consider plans for form- 
ing a matinee club hero this season. This means 
possibly securing of Empire City track as no other is 
available, seemingly.— "j'ea t/" in X. V. Telegraph. 

^ During the season of 1901 the Kansas City Driving 
Club made the following record: Number of events 
in matinees, 98; number of heats, 241; number of start- 
ers, 380; fastest heat trotted, 2:10; fastest heat paced, 
2:15: average time of all heats, 2:244; horses owned by 
members and started in matinees, 57; membership of 
club, over 300. Not included in above was the exhibi- 
tion mile of Cresceus in 2:09}, on October 24th, estab- 
lishing the world's record for one-half mile track. 
Jas. A. Patton is president of this prosperous matinee 
society. 

Sam Gamble writes us from l'leasanton that he de- 
sires "to claim tho name Allegro for his black colt by 
A.xteli2:l2 at three years old ; first dam by Simmons 
2744, second dam (dam of Jeanette 2:22) by Artillery 
750, record 2:214: third dam, that grand broodmare 
Lizzie Hayden by Peavine 513; fourth dam Lizzie 
Brinker (in great broodmare list) by Drennon, thor- 
oughbred." Mr. Gamble has a great'young stallion in 
this fellow, hut will have to guess again for a name, as 
there aro already two stallions registered by the name 
"Allegro." 

Henry Glide, of Sacramento, is trying to fill an order 
from Mexico to purchase a carload of standard bred 
stallions. They must be sound young horses, three or 
four years old, and must weigh from 1100 to 1200 
pounds when matured. Speed nor records are required, 
but size and good looks. Mr. Glide's order also calls 
for a carload each of Holstein cattle, Dovons and 
Jerseys (the latter in particular) and a carload of 
blooded sheep. Any of our readers who have animals 
of the desired kind for sale should address Mr. Glide 
at once at/ the general postoffice, Sacramento. 

Among the California mares that will be bred to 
Cresceus 2:02} this year are Miracle by McKinney. 
She is a full sister to Coney 2:02 and is owned by Mr. 
John W. Gardner, of San' Francisco, who bred her. 
Miracle is now at the Ketcham Farm at Toledo, hav- 
ing gone East in tho car with Cresceus. Little Maid 
2:18, a pacing mare by Rockwood owned by mine host 
C. A. Harrison, of tho Abbotsford Inn, Los Angeles, 
also went to Toledo in tho car to be bred to the cham- 
pion. Mr. Geo. Fox, of Clements, who leased his 
stallion Silver Bow to Mr. Ketcham, has arranged to 
send his mare Kitty Fox by Pancoast to Cresceus this 
spring. 

Z, E. Simmons, for forty years ono of the most 
promising horsemen in tho country, is lying seriously 
ill at the home of his brother-in-law, Daniel J. Beru- 
stein in New York. Mr. Simmons owned George 
Wilkes 2.22 when the famous horse trotted his first 
race under tho name of Robert Fillingham at the 
Fashion track, on Long Island, in 1801. Six years 
later he backed Ethan Allen and running mate to beat 
Dexter in single harness, and put something like 
$50,000 in his pocket when the old stallion vanquished 
his rival in 2:15. Mr. Simmons has lived on his brood- 
ing farm near Lexington, Ky., for twenty years or 
more. He is 72 years old. 



Palmer Clark rightly claims that tho matches for 
$20,000 between Boralma, Lord Derby and The Abbot 
will not decide which is the superior race horse. He 
holds that as one horse or the other may not be in 
condition on the day of the match, the race may be a 
walkover for the other. Mr. Clark suggests that a 
series of contests in which all three horses would com- 
pete in each race would be much more satisfactory. 
While there is no doubt as to this let us not ask too 
much. If an owner puts up his money and loses it 
because his horse is not in condition the man that has 
one little lone dollar to see the raco should not howl 
loud enough to be beard in the next county. The 
match races may result in the two greatest races ever 
B3en, and they may not, but the public should con- 
sider that tho chances of not getting a dollar's worth 
are very remote. 

James Berry man is at work on three promising 
horses belonging to Nowlands k Reardon of Oakland. 
He has tho six year old stallion, Charles Marvin, a full 
brother to Don Lowell 2:144, that is a very handsome 
large horse and an excellent trotting prospect. Charles 
Marvin will bo permitted to serve a few mares this 
spring and then placed in training for the first time. 
Mr. Berryman thinks he has a prize in a dimutivo bay 
mare by McKinney out of a Sidney mare. She is a 
trotter with a gait that is about perfection and shows 
bursts of speed that look to be of tho 2:15 variety 
The sorrel mare, Maud R. by Jim C, is another good 
prospect that Mi-. Berryman has in charge. She is a 
pacer without a record and will be raced in the slow 
classes this year. Mr. Berryman is a careful man and 
says he does not propose moving any of these horse9 
fast for some time yet. He has taken them to the 
Alameda track and has plenty of stall room for a fow 
more which he will train at reasonable terms. 



On a hot day drink Jackson's Napa Soda lemonade 
and bo refreshed. 



JanuaryJ25. 1902| 



American Candidates For English Derby. 

[BY J. J. BURKB ] 

For tho first time in its history the famous Epsom 
Derby, to be run on Wednesday, June 4th, will in all 
probability have as competitors for the glorious "blue 
ribbon of the turf, "as Lord George Bentinek described 
it to Benjamin Disraeli, at least four American turfmen 
of renown. 

It is peculiarly appropriate, too, that thi9, the "Cor- 
onation Derby," should be the occasion of a concerted 
effort by Americans to win it, just twenty -one years 
after the late Mr. Pierre Lorillard's Iroquois should 
have added this coveted trophy to the many which 
adorned the home of his owner at Rancocas. 

For the first time since the death of the Queon it is 
declared that the royal colors will be seen in public. 
Those colors are purple, gold braid, scarlet sleeves, 
black velvet cap with gold fringe. The recent an- 
nouncement that Lord Marcus Beresford has been 
appointed manager of the King's racing stud makes 
this more than probable. 

There are two colts in this year's Derby who were 
nominated by the King while he was still Prince of 
Wales, and it is only reasonable to expect that, whether 
these colts have a chance to win or whether they have 
not, one or both may be started in order to lend eclat 
to the occasion. 

It would be no new thing to see those colors in front 
in the Derby. Twice have they been in the van, once 
on Persimmon in 1896, and again on Diamond Jubilee, 
his full brother, in 1900, both winners bred by their 
owner, this fact alone being quite as much cause for 
congratulation as the actual winning of the great race, 
for to breed even an ordinary stake winner affords the 
keenest pleasure to the real sportsman. 

It is against such turfmen as tho King of England, 
Duke of Devonshire, Lord Alington, Duke of Port- 
land, Lord Bradford, Lord Durham, Lord Falmouth 
(nephew to the more famous nobleman of the same 
name), Lord Rosebery, Baron Rothschild, Mr. Leopold 
de Rothschild, Duke of Westminster and some of the 
very highest class French turfmen that our own Amer- 
icans will this year send their representatives. 

If any of the quartet should be fortunate enough to 
win the great race no ordinary language would suffice 
to describe the real feelings of such a man. Some 
slight idea may be had when it is recalled that last May, 
at the local Gravesend track, when news of the victory 
of his leased English colt, Volodyovski, in the Derby, 
reached Mr. Whitney he at once gave carte blanche to 
the caterer at the track to open wine for all comers. 

Most important to American lovers of the best class 
of racing is the shipment by Mr. Whitney of his colt 
Nasturtium to run for the stake. He was accompanied 
by a stable companion, but few really imagine that 
this colt, Intruder, a juvenile of no known form, was 
sent over with any real hope of being a dangerous con- 
tender. 

Experts agree that it would have been far better if 
the American colt had been sent across the Atlantic 
last September or October, but, as is well known, the 
intentions of his owner were not then centred on this 
enterprise, and it was only after consultation with the 
trainer at his English stable that Mr. Whitney decided 
to take all the risks that a midwinter journey implied. 

James R. Keene's best known candidate for the 
Derby is Kearsarge by Kingston, out of Flying Squad 
ron. This colt was bred by Mr Keene at his Kentucky 
farm and sent to England as a yearling, no doubt after 
having shown good trials, which have to some extent 
since been confirmed by his double victory on two con- 
secutive days, his more important victory being a race 
called the Prendergast Stake, which requires a colt of 
class to win. 

There i9 a stable companion of Kearsarge called 
Choiro, by Horoscope out of Veva, who has never run, 
and about whom little is known. He is a Derby candi- 
date also, bred in this country by Mr. Keene, and sent 
over in company with Kearsarge. These two, with all 
of the horses now in England the property of the 
Messrs. Keene, have recently been placed in charge Of 
another trainer, Felix Leach, whose brother is a 
famous Newmarket veterinarian. 

Mr. Richard Croker's nomination for the Derby is 
called Stanhope. He is a big coarse colt, and Jacob 
Pincus, who trained Iroquois and who has spont some 
recent years in England, compares him to Tom Ochil- 
tree, the great cup horse owned by George Lorillard 
and raced a quarter of a century ago. 

Stanhope is the produce of tho King's horse, Florizel, 
mated to an American mare called King's Daughter, 
sent to England by J. E. McDonald in 1890 and now 
owned by Mr. Croker. This mare is a daughter of the 
late Mr. August Belmont's grand horse Kingfisher, 
who as far back as 1871 was actually *,imed a mile in 
1:40 in a race at two and a quartor miles, ho and Long- 
fellow practically running each other to a standstill, 
so that. a9 Pincus says, "a yeller dog" might have 
beaten both at the finish but for the /act that they 
were the only starters. 



zp'&zzhev nub gtyu v ig mcttt 



The full timo was 4:02:}, which would make the last 
mile and a quarter in 2:22?, or about fourteen seconds 
slower than tho average time of a race at this distance, 
showing how the pace of the first mile told. This was 
thirty years ago, and thestatoment was recently made 
by Kingfisher's trainer at that time that he was good 
enough to have won the English Derby of his year. 

Stanhope, Mr. Croker's colt, i9 a grandson of King- 
fisher, but whether ho is a oolt of the same class as his 
ancestor is open to question. Mr. Croker thinks he is 
a good one, but, many cold-blooded observers of bim at 
Newmarket think otherwise. His late trainer, Enoch 
Wishard, has stated that he has shown speed as good 
as half a mile in 51 seconds, up hill part of the way. 

An intensified international flavor attaches to tho 
Derby of this year by tho fact that Mr William K. 
Vandorbilt has a colt callod Ellsmere engaged. This 
youngster was foaled in France, the produce of an 
American mare, Ella Pinkerton, who was sent over to 
that country in foal to the dead Hanover, whose pre- 
mature death was one of tho groatest blows the turf of 
this country has ever sustained, Mr. Vanderbilt has 
been a consistent purchaser of American mares for his 
stud in France, and only recently he bought tho stall- 
ion Halma, a son of Hanover, the purchase of this 
horse having undoubtedly been prompted by the 
promise shown by Ellsmere, who was among the best 
colts of his age on the French turf in 1901. 

His notable victory at Maisons Lafitte in October 
last, when he defeated afield comprising two and three 
year olds at seven furlongs and ran at if he liked a long 
race, certainly entitles him to great respect. The colt 
is also in the Grand Prix, to be run only a few days 
after the Derby, and the winner of the English stake 
is sometimes at a disadvantage in trying for the French 
prize so soon after the Derby. 

Mr. Vanderbilt has, however, a very strong stable 
this year, judging from their performances in 1901, 
and one thing which may be in their favor is that there 
is no two year old racing in France until August 1st- 
It should be a source of gratification to Americans to 
know that all of Mr. Vanderbilt's best colts and fillies 
are the produce of American mares purchased from 
Mr. Pierre Lorillard in 1895. Among them may be 
mentioned Blush, Ildico and Dolinka, all familiar to 
students of our stud book. 

Nasturtium is beyond doubt the colt in which most 
interest is felt, because of the great odds ho encounters 
in his attempt. Not alone must he be of good enough 
class to bo able to win if ho had no setbacks of any 
sort, but he must survive all tho chances of sickness 
and changes of climate that lurk upon the heels of a 
race horse. His predecessor, Tommy Atkins, sent over 
a year ago on a similar errand — viz., to win the blue 
ribbon — died almost immediately after landing. Killa- 
shandra, a filly, met the same fate. 

On the other, Kilmarnock, Elizabeth M., Elkhorn, 
St. CI oud, Voter and many others landed safelv and 
most of them raced up to their known form. St. 
Cloud was within a short head of winning one of tho 
big Fall handicaps. Voter was a failure in England* 
but a success here; St. Cloud a sitccess in England, a 
failure in America. Kilmarnock was a real good horse 
in both countries, and from the tone of John Hoggins, 
his trainer, there is not a horse upon the English turf 
that has a better chance for the honors to be won in 
the Ascot Gold Cup and Alexandra Vase, to say 
nothing of the other valuable races in which he is 
engaged. 

As to the public form of Mr. Whitney's candidate, 
racing critics liked the manner in which Nasturtium 
won the Flatbush Stakes at Sheepshead Bay, seven 
furlongs, run in 1:25 3-5. But it was over the new or 
nearly straight seven furlongs, and did not rank as 
good a performance as was that of Requital in 1895, 
when he ran around the turn in 1:26, defeated tho 
good colt Ben Brush, ran the first five furlongs in one 
minute flat, and wont on tho full mile in 1:40, as timed 
by a number of experts at the time. This was tho 
most notablo public trial ever shown, and when David 
Gideon, who owned him at that time, was recently 
asked if such a colt as Requital couid have won this 
year's English Derby he emphatically declared that 
he could have won "fifteen Derbys. " 

The same good judge was asked how he liked tho 
chances of Mr. Whitney 's colt for the Derby and ho 
answered that if ho was as good a colt as he appoared 
to be in this country ho would bo a dangerous com- 
petitor, but that it, would have helped his chances very 
much if he could have been landed safely in October 
last. 

James Rowe, Mr. Keone's trainer', who ought to 
know what sort of a colt it took to win tho Derby, 
said that he was influenced by the fact that John 
Huggins was very much of the opinion that Nastur- 
tuum's chances were socond to none. Jacob Pincus, 
who trained Iroquois when ho won tho Dorby of 1881, 
was confident that Nasturtium had a good chance to 
win, but he had never seen him run, and hence was 
dependent upon the opinions of his friends, some of 



whom thought that the colt had bad action for one 
who would bo required to win over thc'poculiar Derby 
course. "But Kingfisher had bad action, too, " said 
Mr. Pincus, "and ho could have won any Derby, and 
might have beaten Longfellow in 1871 in the three- 
mile race that was to follow the Cup of that year, but 
old John Harper refused to run Longfellow against 
Kingfisher, who had a walkover." 

John W. Rogers, trainer of Nasturtium during the 
season of 1901, has expressed tho utmost confidence in 
tho colt, claiming that for speed ho had no superior in 
America, and ho was certain that ho would go tho 
Derby route. 

And finally John Huggins, tho man who is to train 
the Derby colt, is of the opinion that in five months' 
training he will bo able to fit Nasturtium to run a race 
good onough to win the Derby if his class is equal to it. 

Just what tho Derby is and the sort of course the 
winner has to run over to achieve this great honor are 
interesting to Americans who are familiar with the 
circular tracks of this country. As an event, no race 
in tho world surpasses it in drawing power. It is 
declared that a million people see tho race or some 
part of it. This may be an exaggeration, however. 
The transportation facilities to Epsom are not really 
first class. London supplies a greater part of the 
crowd, yet the attendance is much more cosmopolitan 
than those at the now inclosed courses at Sandown or 
Kempton Park. 

In good weather the "going" is all right, fjut in 
times of drought it becomes dry and hard. The 
course, a milo and a half, is a great test of merit, 
although the turn at "Tattonham Corner" is con- 
demned as dangerous. Thero is not a long "run in," 
considering this turn, yet it is said that the Derby 
fields seldom run wide. The shape of tho course is 
not unlike a horseshoe. The first half milo is up hill 
somewhat, then a long descent to "Tattonham Corner. '' 
For the last throe furlongs of tho raco there is a gentle 
rise. Good shoulders are essential for a Derby colt. 

This year will be the 122nd running. It was first 
raced for in 1780, and its winner, Diomed, imported to 
America. In five crosses Lexington, • tho greatest 
horse of his time, went back to Diomed as follows: 
Lexington, Boston, Timoleon, Sir Archy and Diomed. 
Not once in fifty years is the Derby winner less than 
the best of his year, although it has sometimes hap- 
pened that the best of the year was disqualified 
through the death of his nominator, or because he was 
not entered in tho stake. Frequently a Derby winner 
has been retired at tho close of his three year old form 
and begun to earn enormous fees for his owner. 

Immense prices are often realized for Derby winners 
when sold. Thus Ormonde was bought by a young 
.Californian for $150,000, and two years ago his grand- 
son, Flying Fox, was sold for over $187,500 — a record 
never yet equaled. His present owner is M. Blanc, 
the famous continental turfman. 

More than once it has been charged that horses 
more than three years old have won it, and it was 
proved to be true in one instance — that of Running 
Rein, in 1844. In 18(i7, Hermit won at long odds, it 
having been reported that he had burst a blood vessel 
several days before tho race. The winner of 1868, 
Blue Gown, was purchased by Mr. James R. Keene in 
1876, but died at sea on his way to America. Thoro 
have been two dead heats for the race in its entiro 
history — 1828 and 1884. Mr. Pierre Lorillard was the 
only turfman who won with an American horse. L. 
Reiff was the only American jockey to ride a Derby 
winner — Volody>vski — New York Henthl Jan., Igth. 



Will Ride Across the Continent. 

On our front page to day is a picture of Mr. G. von 
Zodlitz-Noukirch of this city, formerly an officer in 
the Gorman army, and a gray horse ho proposes riding 
from San Francisco to Now York. Tho gentleman 
purchased the horse from Mr. H. B. Goeckon, tho well 
known hay and grain merchant of this city, who bred 
and raised him at his farm near Livermoro. He is 
called Young Roland, and was sired by Mr. Goecken's 
stallion Roland, a son of tho Electioneer stallion Junlo 
and tho running bred mare Oregon Bello. Tho dam 
of Young Roland was a full sister to Sweotbriar 2:26}, 
theroforo by Eugene Casserly, a son of tho old twenty 
milo trotter Gen. Taylor, and out of Peanuts by Geo. 
M. Patchen 31. Young Roland is full of trotting 
blood, is a good weight packer and a very hardy horse. 
He will get a pretty severe tost on tho trip as his rider 
weighs about two hundred pounds. The trip will be 
begun about March 1st. 

Owen Brothers' good racehorse Grady, winner of 
many stakes and races at all distances, died at tho 
farm of his owners in Fresno county last week. He 
was by Three Choers out of Gold Cup and ono of tho 
fastest and most consistent thoroughbreds that over 
raced in California. 

Sober up on Jackson's Napa Soda. 



6 



[January 25, 1»02 



THE WEEKLY 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

F. W. KELLEY, PROPRIETOR. 

Turf and Sporting Authority of the Pacific Coast. 

— OFFICE — 

36 GEARY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

P. O. BOX 2300. 



Ternii— Oue Tear #3, Six Month* SI. 75, Three Month* SI 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Money should be sent by postal order, draft or by registered letter 
addressed to F. W. Kem.ey, 36 Geary St., San Francisco. Cal. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's name and 
address, not necessarily for publication, but as a private guarantee 
of good faith. 

G. G. TDKRI & CO., Agents. Subscription and advertising. 

Salisbury Building, Melbourne, Australia 



San Francisco, Saturday, January 18, 1902. 



Stallions Advertised. 

TROTTING BKEU. 

?2£ N tI E d 2^ E , C £ 2:05!4 V C L - Griffiths Pleasanton 

REY DIRECT 2:1(1 Los Angeles. Geo. A. Davis, Pleasanton 

WILKES DIRECT fcSB* T. VV. Barstow, San Jose 

MCKINNEY 2:111* c A . Durfeei Sau Jose 

NEIL W H. F. R. Vail, Santa Barbara 

6IDNEY DILLON Frank Turner, Santa Rosa 

THOROUGHBREDS. 

08SARY James McDonnell, Portola, San Mateo Co 

.ST. CARLO James McDonnell, Portola, San Mateo Co 

HACKNEYS 

GREEN'S RUFUS The Baywood Stud, San Mateo 



■"THE PRINCIPAL SUBJECT of conversation among 
■ breeders of harness horses on this Coast at the 
present time is the Special Stallion Stake announced 
by the California State Agricultural Society for the 
get of stallions that stood for service in 1901, the races 
to be trotted and paced by the three year olds in 1905, 
A wager has already been made by a prominent horse 
breeder that the stake will exceed $20,000 in value- 
Without doubt it is one of the best stakes ever devised 
and that it should have been inaugurated by the State 
Agricultural Society is a matter of pride for Califor. 
nians. Every stallion owner that has visited the office 
of the Breeder and Sportsman this week has 
asserted that ho will name nis stallion in the stake and 
endeavor to have as many of the stallion's foals of 1902 
named as possible. After the stallions are named on 
February 15th, it is certain that breeders will perusethe 
the list carefully who in 1901 sent their mares to be bred, 
as they will naturally wish to know whether the colts 
that appear this spring will be eligible to the stake 
which will doubtless be the richest stake ever trotted 
or paced for thi9 sido of the Mississippi river. We 
presume all our readers are familiar with the condi- 
tions of the stake, but if not we refer them to our ad- 
vertising columns where they are fully set forth. 
There is no standard bred stallion in California, that 
was in the stud last year, whose owner can afford to 
keep out of this stake, as the winner of either division 
will hardly bring more fame and reputation to its sire 
than any other event will do that is trotted or paced 
on this Coast in 1905. The owners of the sires of win- 
ners will not only be paid $250 each out of the stake, 
but their horses will receive a very greatly increased 
patronage the following spring, as "breed to the sires 
of stake winners" is getting to be a rule with harness 
horse breeders as it is with the breeders of thorough- 
breds. Every stallion owner in the States and Terri- 
tories in which stallions are eligible should name hi9 
horse in this stake. 



TWENTY-FOUR BROODMARES, one stallion and 
■ two geldings from Palo Alto Stock Farm will be 
sold at auction at the Occidental Horse Exchange, 721 
Howard 9treet, next Thursday. This announcement 
should be sufficient to attract to the sale every man in 
California who intends devoting any of his time and 
attention in the next few years to the breeding of light 
harness horses. Palo Alto i9 the greatest breeding 
farm ever founded, and has done more to increase the 
value of California horses than any other venture. 
The horses that now comprise this famous stud are to 
be dispersed during the year, through sales in San 
Francisco, Sacramento, Cleveland and New York. 
The mares and stallions that will be offered here in 
California are among the best on the farm. There are 
many producers and great individuals among them, 
and their breeding is choice. This is the time and the 
opportunity for breeders to get something good and 
choice and it should not take long to dispose of this 
first consignment. The mare Bell Bird 2:22 as a two 
year old, a daughter of Electioneer and Beautiful 
Bells, is in the catalogue. She should bring thousands 
of dollars. Elsie by Gen. Benton is another. She is 
the dam of Palita 2:10, Rio Alto 2:16i, Novelist 2:27, 
Mary Osborne 2:28J and Salvini 2:3C, all colt trotters 



and is out of Elaine 2:20, dam of four in the list. Ella, 
2:29, a full sister to Helena 2:11}, is another. Lady 
Well 2:16J, a daughter of Electioneer that has pro- 
duced a 2:20 three year old is to be sold. Coralie, a 
young mare by Boodle 2:12*, out of a full sister to 
Anteeo 2:16}, Antevolo 2;19A, and others will go to the 
highest bidder. Lady Nutwood, daughter of the 
greatest producing sire in the world, is in the cata- 
logue. She has produced Ned Thorne 2:111 and three 
others with records, and was stinted to Mendocino last 
May. Sabling, a full sister to Sable Wilkes 2:18, and 
Laura Drew, dam of the first yearling to beat 2:30, 
will be sold. Azmoor, one of the best representatives 
of the Electioneer-thoroughbred cross, is the only 
stallion to be offered at this sale. He is a producer 
of extreme speed and a high class horse. The sale 
will begin on Thursday morning next at 11 o'clock at 
721 Howard street. Send for a catalogue to William 
G. Layng, auctioneer, at the above address if you have 
not already received one, look it over carefully and be 
there ready to bid. There will be many of the animals 
sold for less than they are worth. 



TTHE GREAT DISPERSAL SALE of the thor- 
1 oughbreds and other stock on the Sonoma Stock 
Farm will be held at the salesyard, 1732 Market street, 
on Tuesday, February 4th, beginniusr at 10 a. m. 
This sale is by order of the court and is held that the 
estate of the late J. B. Chase (who was one of Califor- 
nia's leading breeders of thoroughbreds) may be 
settled. There are nineteen highly bred broodmares, 
nine yearlings, eleven two year olds, one three year 
old and eight four year olds. Among the producing 
mares are Catalina, dam of Centella and Randwick, 
Mischief, the dam of Amanda; Rosedale, dam of Man- 
zanillo; Rebecca, dam of Isaline, Daniella, Misfortune, 
Fortuna and Glorianna; Miss Lou, dam of Glengaber; 
Mary E., dam of Antoinella and others. Among the 
mares that have won races are Amanda by Warwick, 
Mischief by Thad Stevens, Marigold by Milnor (winner 
of the best long distance race ever run in California, 
holding the record of 7:20] at four miles, which is the 
world 's race record for mares), Centella by Joe Hooker'- 
Rosedale by Joe Hooker, Phcebe Ann by imp. Friar 
Tuck, Constance M. by Joe Hooker, Mystery (winner 
of three De'-bys) by Three Cheers, Miss Lou by 
Volturno, Mary E. (never beaten) by Ironclad, Fare- 
well bj imp Glenelg and Miss Pollard by imp. Idalium 
brother to Sir Mod red and Cheviot. There is much 
of the celebrated Katy Pease and Hennie Farrow blood 
in the mares and their produce to be sold at this sale, 
and the colts and fillies are by such horses as imp. 
Trentola, Eolo, Del Norte, Dare, Primrose and other 
well bred horses. Mr. Chase, in establishing the 
Sonoma Stock Farm, laid its foundation in the lines 
that had produced long distance race winners, and l.e 
met with much success. Few breeding farms in the 
world have turned out a greater proportion of winners 
to the number bred. As a side issue he also bred 
roadsters, giving particular attention to size and good 
looks, and among the twenty horses of trotting blood 
to be sold at thU sale are many very handsome and 
stylish individuals. The sale is absolute and without 
reserve and buyers will have the best opportunity to 
get horses at their own prices that has been offered in 
San Francisco for years. 



MR. FRANK P. KENNEY, Secretary and Manager 
of that sterling publication the Kentucky Stock 
Farm, has sold his interest in the paper to Mr. Charles 
L. Monsch, President of the company, and retired 
temporarily from journalism. Mr. Kennoy is such an 
active business man that he will not be long out of 
harness, and as he prefers the journalistic end of life's 
game, and has a natural aptitude for it, will doubtless 
remain in that line. The Stock Farm, under his man- 
agement, has been greatly improved and has ahead of 
it a very properous year. It is one of the best papers 
devoted to horse interests that is published. 



THE ONLY OBJECTION that can be offered to the 
proposed change in the rules that will permit 
three races to be sandwiched instead of two, is that it 
will allow more than the regular 25 minutes between 
heats where there is considerable scoring. This should 
not be weighty enough to prevent the change. If the 
time in some cases is drawn out to 40 minutes between 
heats, it will probably result in a closer contest in the 
following heat, and if the forty minutes is taken up by 
a couple of good heats in other races, the public will bo 
pleased. 

SEVERAL STALLION ADVERTISEMENTS that 
reached us too late for this issue of the Breeder 
and Sportsman will appear next week. The breed- 
ing season will begin on the 1st of February and 
owners should have their advertisements in by Wed- 
nesday next that they may appear in the first edition 
in February which will be printed next Saturday. 



r T , HE RETURN TO AUCTIONS AND MUTUALS 
1 as the system of betting on harness races, which 
has been so long desired by owners and breeders of 
harness horses in California, may be accomplishsd this 
year, and if so there should be a most successful cir- 
cuit. The State Board of Agriculture has taken the 
first step, and at its meeting in Sacramento on the 8th 
of February will in all probability decide that no 
books can bo made at the State Fair on harness rac- 
ing. Secretary Geo. W. Jackson has, during the past 
week, sent out a request to all the harness horsemen 
in California that they send to the Board their opinion 
as to the most desirable system of betting for harness 
races. This request is made upon a return postal card 
and the recipient has but to fill out the blauks on the 
same and drop the card in the mail. There should be 
no delay in the matter and we hope, for the credit of 
harness horse owners and those interested in the busi- 
ness in any way, that every card sent out by the Sec- 
retary will be returned as requested. The Board is 
ready to act as the majority of the horsemen desire. 
If the State Board abolishes the evil of book betting 
on harness races, the district boards will be encour- 
aged to do the same thing and with fair purses the 
circuit of harness racing will be ahead of anything seen 
in California for years. 



REPORTS ARE PUBLISHED in all the San Fran- 
cisco dailies of an Eastern plunger who is break- 
ing the books and winning such loads of money at 
Oakland every day that it requires the services of 
several assistants to carry it home. $80,000 is the 
amount he is said to have won Thursday. The prob- 
abilities are that he did not win one-tenth that sum, 
but the crowd of suckers that will read the story and 
try to emulate him will lose more in a day than he 
wins in a week. 



MR. B. S. KREHE reached Agricultural Park, San 
Jose, this week with his two handsome stallions, 
Alcyo 2:10 by Alcyone, and Pistol, a son of Lancelot. 
The performances and breeding of these horses, both 
of which wore purchased in the east last fall by Mr 
Krehe, were printed in our holiday edition, together 
with half tone engravings of both. As they are fine 
individuals and bred in fashionable lines they should 
be well patronized. 

CARTRIDGE AND SHELL. 



It is fair to assume, that in the light of experiences 
during the past two seasons, the days of professional- 
ism at the traps are numbered.- Amateurs and pro- 
fessionals are drifting further and further apart, and 
at the opon-to-all shoots nowadays no big attendance 
can be look-id for unless there is considerable added 
m.mey to draw a crowd. At many shoots last year 
there was but a small gathering of shooters at the 
"open"traps. The reason was not far to seek: There 
was company at those traps that was far too hot for 
the average amateur to back up against; as a natural 
result he was not present, and the manufacturers' 
agents had it all to themselves. Only a few years ago 
an average of thirty entries was quite an ordinary tour- 
nament; now an average of twenty-five in all the pro- 
gram events is considered good, and very few shoots 
attain that standard. Undoubtedly much of this is 
due to the introduction of professionalism, that is, the 
sending around to tournaments men hired by manu- 
facturers of and dealers in sporting goods to show off 
and expound the good qualities of the articles manu- 
factured by their employers. At firtt this was a small 
thing, but it grew very rapidly until "de gang" got to 
be recognized as such, and when that time came the 
amateurs grew wiser and tightened their purse strings. 
Having once learned the lesson they never forgot that 
they had no chance to come out even in a contest with 
a man whose business it was to shoot, and who, by 
constant and assiduous practice, had reduced trap- 
shooting to a very fine science. 



A few days ago, says a correspondent in Shootinq 
and Fishing, I asked an old hunter and trapper where 
was the best place to shoot a bear, elk, or cougar. 
"In shooting large game, "he replied, "such as elk, 
bear, cougar, and even deer, I have, whenever it was 
possible, shot them through the shoulders. That is, 
in my opinion, the best place. Oh, if you could always 
put a bullet through the brain or heart, that would 
be all right, but one can't always choose the target. 
I use a 40, 44, or 45 calibre. If you smash a big animal 
through the shoulder and break the bones, you gener- 
ally disable it so that it can't get away or do you any 
damage. That has been my experience, and I have 
hunted and trapped for many years through the 
mountains of northern California and southern Ore- 
gon. I have met all sorts of big game there I have 
neverfailed yet to bringan animal down when Ismashed 
his shoulders; yes, and he generally stayed down. If 
you have any show at all, you stand a good chance of 
putting a shot through the shoulders. If you go for 
the head or heart you may miss, and then the animal 
will escape or else will make things hot for you. I 
make it a rule of shooting through the shoulders. 
You will knock out a bear or cougar almost every 
time, or an elk. Remember, you want a gun with a 
big bullet — a 50 calibre is the best." 



January 25, 1902] 



The Money is Up. 

New York, January 22.— Articles of agreement for 
tho two match races for $20,000 asido between Thomas 
W. Lawson's Boralmaand E. E. Smathers' Lord Derby 
and John J. Scannell's The Abbot were signed to-day 
by the owners, thus consummating what promises to 
be two of the greatest trotting races ever docided on 
the turf. 

The agreement was s : gned by Mr. Lawson and for- 
warded to Messrs. Smathers and Scannell, and as the 
conditions were satisfactory to tho latter, both geutlo- 
men affixed their signatures without delay. 

The conditions named in the articles are the same as 
those accepted by the owners of the racers when they 
posted their forfeit of $5000 each. The Boralma-Lord 
Derby match will take place first and the Boralma-Tlio 
Abbot race be decided on a date to be selected not 
earlier than two weeks subsequent to tho Boralma- 
Lord Derby match. The following is a copy of tho 
articles signed by Mr. Lawson and Mr. Smathers 
to-day. The agreement between Mr. Lawson and Mr. 
Scannell is practically the same, except that the 
Boralma-The Abbot race will not take place until two 
weeks after Boralma meets Lord Derby. Mr. Smathers 
would like to have his match decided at Brighton 
Beach, because he believes there is more interest taken 



Cresceus Reaches Home. 



Cresceus 2:021 ilna " Ms party arrived home in Tolodo 
last night, says the Toledo lice of January 10th. 

"Is Cresceus in good condition?" was asked of owner 
and driver Georgo Ketcham. 

"Good condition? Well, I should say he was. 
Why, we were fifty-four hourson tho road from Waco t 
and when wo took Cresceus out of the car last night 
for a time I was afraid he would get away from tho 
boy who was loading him. The rest of the horses in 
the car were pretty well tired out, but not Cresceus — 
he's a wonderful horse. 

"Cresceus is in as good condition now as he was 
when ho loft Toledo in tho spring. The man who put 
new shoes on him this morning said that his logs wore 
in finer condition than ever. I am going to have him 
weighed to-day to seo how much he has gained. To- 
morrow he will be taken out to tho farm. 

"The hoalth of all tho members of our party is ex- 
cellent," said Mr. Ketcham, "and we didn't miss a 
feed. I never had such a good time in all my life and 
I never was so glad to get back home, either." 

"Cresceus has trotted his last race," continued his 
owner, "but not perhaps his last fast milo. Possibly, 
next August, I shall go after 'em again." 

When asked as to the close of his trip, he said: 




THE ABBOT 2:03 1-4. 



in the race there than in any other place. The articles 
governing the contest follow: 

This agreement, made and entered into this day 

of January, 1002, between Mr. Thomas W. Lawson of 
Boston, owner of Boralma, party of the first part, and 
Mr. E. E. Smathers of New York, owner of Lord 
Derby, party of the second part. 

1. The parties of the first and second part hereby 
agree to have the said Boralma and the said Lord 
Derby meet in a special match race at a time between 
the l'jth of July and tho 1st of September, 1002, which 
is to bo hereinafter mutually agreed upon by the 
parties of tho first and second parts. 

2. The said race is to be trotted at a track to be 
hereinafter agreed upon between said owners, said 
track to bo agreed upon to be that track which shall 
offer the best inducements for said race. 

3. The bids for said race will be received up to 
March 1, 1002. 

4. Trotting associations desiiing to secure the said 
race are instructed to send their offers to Harry 
Beecher, sporting editor of tho New York Journal, who 
will forward tho same to the parties of tho first and 
3econd parts for final action. 

5. The parties of the first and second parts further 
agree that tho special match ^ace in which said 
Boralma and Lord Derby will contest shall bo tho best 
three (3) in five (5) heats. The race to bo decided 
under the National Trotting Association rules of 1001. 

6. The said match race between the said Boralma 
and said Lord Derby to be for the sum of $20,000 a 
side and all additional moneys. 

7. Five thousand of the $20,000 to bo deposited 
upon the signing of said agreement. The second 
$5000 to be deposited on July 1, 1902, and tho balance, 
$10,000, to be deposited tho night before tho date 
selected for said match. 

8. It is mutually agreed upon by tho parties of tho 
first and second parts that all forfeits and said side 
stake shall be posted with Harry Beecher, sporting 
editor of the New York Journal. 

Thomas W. Lawson, 
E. E. Smathers. 
Witnesses: For Thomas W. Lawson — Charles C. 
Clapp; for E. E. Smathers— J. V. Smith. 

California favorite hot weather drink— JacksOD's 
Napa Soda. 



"The tracks were very bad in Texas and the fact is I 
did not care to waste any more time thore, and besides 
I was not able to close the dates rapidly enough." 

The horse will now be put in the stud. 

The Cresceus car was attached to the Katy flyer, 
and besides the mascot dog, Bob Cresceus, Cresceus 
himself and Mike tho Tramp, the trotter's pacemaker, 
there were four other horses brought back from the 
West to become temporary residents at tho Ketcham 
farm. These were: Silver Bow by Robert McGregor 
2:16J, a stallion owned by Mr. George Fox, a Californian, 
and leased by Mr. Ketcham. Silver Bow is a large 
horse; sixteen and a half hands high, a dark bay with 
no white on him. 

Loudenia Wilkes 2:14.j, a trotter by Ashland Wilkes-, 
dam by Patohon Wilkes, owned by Henry Bing, of 
Denison, Texas. 

Miracle, a full sister to Coney 2:02, pacer; owned by 
John W. Gardiner, of San Francisco. 

Littlo Maid 2:18, pacer, by Rock wood; first dam by 
Pocahontas Mambrino: ownod by C. A. Harrison, Los 
Angeles. 

Others that are coining in tho very near future aro 
Kitty Fox by Pancoast, from Clements, Cal.; B. K. 
Walker by Dictator, first dam by King Reno, from 
Denver, Col.; Lucy Carr 2 : 1 4 J , trotter, and Adoboll, a 
full sister to Adbell, tho champion yearling trotter; 
ownod by Alexander McLaren, Quoboc, Canada. 

Cresceus wont a milo over the Dallas, Texas, track 
in 2:07 J on New Year's Day, tho fastest milo trotted 
ovor any track at that timo of tho year. Mr. Ketcham 
was asked if he regarded that as the most remarkable 
milo trottod during tho trip. He said that it would bo 
hard to decido what was the most remarkablo milo, 
but he himself thought best of tho milo at Pueblo, 
Col., in 2:10}, which was covered ovor a very poor 
half-mile track. 

"The westorn tracks as a rule are very poor, and 
without plenty of water there's no way of keeping tho 
tracks in good condition." 



Apropos of this some funny conditions wero met 
with in the west. The track at Waco was so bad that 
no exhibition was given there at all, there being no 
fence around part of tho track. At Denison, on Janu- 
ary 4th, a milo over tho half-mile track there was cov- 
ered in 2:14, in spite of the deep sand which covered it. 

At Tucson, Ariz., a dandy was run across, there 
being as much as eight inches of sand in tho stretches, 
whilo on tho turns the wind swept it clean and the 
track thore was a rock, and had been covered with 
shavings as a sort of mediator. 

At Albuquerque, N. M., on Christmas Day a mile 
was covered over a half-mile track in 2:16}. It hap- 
pened that near the track was a spring. Tho spring 
became lively and Hooded the track, but tho mile was 
made in pretty good timo after all. 

Something like twenty-two exhibitions wero given 
since Cresceus left Tolodo. The Columbus mile still 
stands first at 2:02J, and that over the half-mile track 
at Kansas City in 2:09] is the best since the horso left 
Toledo. 

Mr. Ketcham brought back with him a number of 
trunks filled with valuable and beautiful trophies given 
him in honor of Cresceus. This morning a valuable 
bridle camo from Phoenix, Arizona, braided entirely of 
black and white horse hair, a very valuable and unique 
specimen indeed. 

It was an interesting trio that came down Adams 
street this morning— Cresceus, the fastest trottor in 
the world, led by Eddie Mitchell, who has worked 
with the horso for tho past three years, and tho littlo 
snub faced Bull Terrier mascot, which has followed 
the successes of the ereat horse all over the country. 

Eddie Mitchell was all smiles, and it kept him busy 
greeting his friends; tho mascot seemed to be glad to 
be home again, too; Cresceus, wrapped up in a fine 
blanket, green and yellow trimmed, the gift of John 
Wanamaker, the Philadelphia Sunday school teacher, 
aloneseemed to take his new environment with coolness. 

The Ketcham party arrived last night at 10:1(0 over 
the Clover Leaf, coming direct from Waco, Texas, 
after a trip of about two days. The party consisted 
of Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Ketcham, Miss Rachel Ketcham, 
Tim Murnane, Cashier Greene, Eddie Mitchell, Peter 
Driscoll, who had charge of Mike the Tramp, Cresceus' 
running mate, and Tom Caffrey, a helper. 

Cresceus was taken to Mr. Ketcham's stable on 
Eleventh street this morning and fitted out with 3ix 
ounce road shoes. vVhile at the forge on St. Clair 
street he was the attraction which led many to give 
him a formal call. 

Cresceus is certainly a horso with a good disposition, 
and was brilliant enough to keep discreetly silent. 

He nibbled apples given by Eddie Mitchell, and 
when fitted out with his new shoes, stood for a picture 
and was taken back to the stable. 



Geo. Borry, the officiont superintendent of the 
Spreckels Stock Farm at Napa, is looking with groat 
pride upon a colt that was introduced to him one 
morning last week by tho imported Australian maro 
Candid by Splendor. Candid was a stake winner in 
Australia and California and this colt by her is sired 
by tbat good horse imp. St. Andrew, sire of many 
winners and one of the best sons of St. Simon over 
brought to America. The youngster is largo and 
very activo and a handsomo fellow all ovor. 



Tho Occident Stake for 1004 has 84 ontrios. 



Warranted 

to give satisfaction. 




GOMBAILT'S 

CAUSTIC BALSAM 

A safe, speedy and 
positive cure lor 

Curb, Splint, Sweeny, Capped Hock, 
Strained Tendons, Founder, Wind Puffs, 
and all lameness from Spavin, Ringbone 
and other bony tumors. Cures all skin 
diseases or Parasites, Thrush, Diphtheria. 
Removes all Bunches from Horses or 
Cattle. 

a * n HITMAN KI M I'll Y for Rhea- 
nt:i t l«m. M|»rjiin», .Nor<* I hi ,..,(. tic. . it 

i. invaluable 

Even bottle ..« < :iu«lle H:iI«iiiii lold i- 
Warranted I.. five sntlsl... imn I', i... * 1 .an 

per bottle, Sold by druavlKte. or Mot by ex 

|'| « — . rlifiryes pnid. vvllli full diriM-Moiis fur It* 

nee. Semi for deecriptlve clnBuJa.Ee, teettino* 

nlnKctc. Address 

THE LAWRENCE-WILLIAMS COMPANY, Cleveland, Ohio. 



1 ROD, GUN AND KENNEL. i 

1^7=1 Conducted by J. X. I>e WITT. VM 



Coming Events. 



liench Shows. 

Feb. 4, 5, 6— Rhode Island Kennel Club. Annual bench show 
Providence, R. I. George D. Miller, Secretary. 

Feb. 11, 12 13, M— Westminster Kennel Club. James Mortimer 
Superintendent, New York City. 

Feb. 26-March 1— Duquesne Kennel Club of Western Pennsyl- 
vania. F. S. Stedman, Secretary, Pittsburg, Pa. 

Field Trials. 

Jan 80— United States Field Trial Club. Annual trials. Grand 
Junction, Tenn. W. S. Stafford, Secretary, Trenton, Tenn. 

Feb. 3— Alabama Field Trial Club. Fifth annual trials. Madi- 
son, Ala. T. H. Spencer, Secretary-treasurer. 

Feby. 8— Continental Field Trial Club. Annual trials. Grand 
Junction. Tenn. Theo. Sturgis, Secretary, Greenfield Hill, Conn. 



Pacific Coast Derby and All-Age. 



[REPORTED BY ALBERT BETZ. J 

The nineteenth annual trials of the Pacific Coast 
Field Trials Club were held at Santa Maria, Santa Bar- 
bara county, beginning on Monday morning, January 
13th, and were completed on the afternoon of Wednes- 
day, the 15th inst. But two stakes were run: The 
Derby with seven starters and the All-Age with fifteen- 
The small number of Derby starters was a disappoint- 
ment, there having been thirty-five original nomina- 
tions and twenty-ono having paid second forfeit; but 
death and disease played havoc with the young dogs, 
and, as a matter of fact, the older ones did not entirely 
escape. 

The Derby purse was $350, of which 50% went to 
first, 30° to second and 20"„ to third. The All-Age 
purse footed up $340 and was divided up in like manner. 

Prof. John A. Balmer, of Cle-Elum, Wash., officiated 
in the saddle; and it was at once apparent that a bettor 
choice could hardly have been made. His decisions met 
with the general approval of those present who under- 
stood what field trials were for, and no adverse com- 
ment was heard concerning his rulings. 

Cuba Jr., the winner of first in the Derby, was by 
all odds far ahead of any of the other Derby dogs; but 
he mot with defeat when up against the seasoned dogs 
in the All-Age. Dr. Daniels and Pearl's Jingle, the 
winners of first and second in the latter event, are 
Pointars hard to surpass, and Prof. Balmer compares 
them favorably with some of the best Pointers he has 
seen in the Eastern trials. Peach Blossom and North- 
ern Huntress, who divided third in the All-Age, were 
but little behind the winners of first and second. They 
go with great speed, have a wide range, hunt diligently 
and have a merry way of going. Blossom's bird work 
was not the best, but with another season's work she 
will be a bitch hard to beat. Huntress has had but 
little work on California quail and should improve 
wonderfully with more experience. 

While iho weather conditions on the particular days 
the events were run were rather favorable than other- 
wise, the extreme dryness prevailing made it difficult 
for the dogs to locate birds. Many were found, but 
they seemed to emit little or no scent. Notwithstand- 
ing, the trials wero very successful and the attendance 
was good, many of the local residonts taking as much 
interest therein as the members of the club. Had 
there been a rain a few days previous to the time the 
trials were held the grounds and conditions would have 
been ideal. Residents of Santa Maria did all in their 
power to make them a success and to provide for the 
comfort of the visiting sportsmen. 

The annual meeting of the club was held on Wednes- 
day evening, January 25th, and the following officers 
were elected: J. E. Teriy, of Sacramento, President; 
Hon. W. W. Van Arsdale, of San Francisco, First 
Vice-President; Hon. H. W. Keller, of Santa Monica, 
Second Vice-President; Albert Betz, of San Francisco, 
Secretary-Treasurer. Executive Committee— Hon. C. 
N. Post, W. S. Tevis, Clinton E. Worden, John H. 
Schumacher and T. J. A. Tiedemann. It was decided 
to run the next trials commencing on the second Mon- 
day of January, 1!»03, the place of holding the trials to 
be determined later by the Executive Committee. The 
same stakes are to be run as were scheduled for this 
year. 

The question of selecting and maintaining permanent 
grounds was discussed at length, and it is hoped that 
within a few months such selection will be made. 

The following named gentlemen were proposed for 
and elected to membership: F. J. Stone, of Fresno; 
Geo. H. Anderson, of San Jose; Dr. C. W. Hibbard, of 
San Francisco, and R. L. Jones, of the Hart Hotel, 
Santa Maria. 

A vote of thanks was extended to Prof. Balmer for 
his services to the club and for tbe efficient manner in 
which he judged the trials. 

The following were noted amongst those in atten- 
dance: J, E. Terry of Sacramento, Cap't Roland of 
Nevada, Geo. H. Anderson of San Jose, Mr. McCaffrey 
of San Luis Obispo, Mr. McDaniels of Paso Robles, 
Hon. H. W. Keller of Santa Monica, F. W. Emery of 



Buena Park, John H Schumacher and A. Marquis of 
Los Angeles, Dr. Bagby, R. L. Jones, Thos. Cooper, 
Mr. Elliott, Mr. Trott, Mr. Blosser, Dr. Lucas and 
others of Santa Maria, Hon. W. W. Van Arsdale, J. 
M. Kilgariff, H. T. Payne, Dr. C. W. Hibbard. Chas. 
Douglas, Fred Butler, Geo. Whitney, W. A. Cutler, 
Frank Maskey, T. J. A. Tiedemann, Albert Betz of 
San Francisco, R. M. Dodge, Bakersfield, W. B. and 
Fred Coutts of Kenwood, J. E. Lucas, San Rafael, C. 
H. Babcock of McCloud and F. J. Stone, Fresno. 

The genial countenance of Judge C. N. Post, one of 
the organizers of the Club, who never failed to be 
present at all previous trials, was greatly missed by the 
members of the Club; official duties prevented his 
attendance. 

The Derby. 

The draw for the Derby was held on Sunday evening, 
January 12th. But seven entries paid the starting 
fee, and the order of running was as follows: 

Clinton E. Worden 's English Setter dog Wade Earl 
with W. B. Coutt's Pointer bitch Kenwood Rose. 

H. L. Batten's English Setter bitch Rod's Lark (in 
the string of W. W. Van Arsdale) with W. B. Coutt's 
Pointer dog Ned Funston. 

F. J. Stone's English Setter dog Diana's Rod field 
with Stockdale Kennels' Cuba Jr. 

W W. Van Arsdale's English Setter dog Oakley's 
Prido drew the bye. 

Monday, January 13th. The morning was quite 
cool, and weather conditions were more favorable than 
had been expected. After a drive of about six miles 
the Brat brace was cast off in a field adjacent to the 
river bed, the ground being extremely dry. 

Wade Earl — Kenwood Rose: Cast off at 9:15, in sage 
brush. Wade Earl was handled by John E. Lucas. 
W. B. Coutt's handling Rose. Soon after going down 
Wade Earl pointed a moment on running birds, which 
he flushed. Rose followed with a point on a single, 
being somewhat unsteady; then flushed and chased. 
Wade made another point on a single during the heat. 
Rose, however, had the better range and style, the 
Setter evidently being in poor condition. Ordered up 
at 9:55. (Wade Earl later died while en route to the 
kennels of his handler.) 

Rod's Lark — Ned Funston. Down at 10:15, the for- 
mer handled by C. H. Babcock, the latter by Coutts. 
After amusing themselves for some time chasing rab- 
bits Ned made a nice point and was quickly followed 
by Lark with a snappy point. Neither dog was well 
under control and they were an evenly matched pair. 
They ran until 10:50 but no further bird work was 
had. Both t ad good range and speed. This heat 
was run in the river bed where the going was rather 
difficult. 

Diana's Rodfield — Cuba Jr. Down at 11 A. M., 
Diana's Rodfield was handled by F. J. Stone, R. M. 
Dodge having charge of Cuba, Jr. The dogs were 
cast off in the river bottom where the going was rather 
difficult. Both dogs displayed good speed and range, 
the Setter for the first fifteen or twenty minutes out- 
ranging the Pointer and staying out better, but at the 
end of that time ho slacked up materially and the 
Pointer had the better of the heat. No birds were 
found, and the dogs were ordered up at 11:35. 

Oakley's Pride (a bye). Handled by Babcock Dur- 
ing the running of the Diana's Rodfield — Cuba Jr., 
heat, the byo dog, Oakley's Pride, was given a run of 
thirty-five minutes on ground adjoining the river bank. 
The judging was done by Mr. John H. Schumacher 
and Mr. T. J. A. Tiedemann. Some point work was 
done, one point on a single on the bank of the river 
being within view of all the spectators. His range 
was but medium and he slowed up materially before 
the end of the run. 

This ended the first series and a bountiful lunch 
which had been furnished by the hotel management 
was partaken of. 

SECOND SERIES. 

This series was run on new grounds, northwest of 
the scene of the morning's work, which were reached 
after a four mile drive. More birds and better cover 
were found and the work of the dogs considerably 
improved. The first brace of the second series was: 

Kenwood Rose — Rod's Lark. Down at 1:40. The 
dogs were in heavy brush, where birds were plentiful, 
but tbe work was rather poor. Few points were made. 
Rod flushed and cnased, Rose doing likewise but being 
steady to wing. Each dog was credited with a point, 
but many opportunities were lost. Up at 2:20. 

Ned Funston — Cuba Jr. Down at 2:32. Cuba soon 
found birds and pointed in fine style, being steady to 
shot. Ned backed honestly. Cuba quickly followed 
with several more points and acknowledged wing to 
flushed birds. Ned received credit for a point during 
the heat. Cuba outclassed his opponent and put up a 
fine heat, making no mistakes. They were ordered up 
at 2:55. 

Diana's Rodfield— Oakley's Pride. Down at 3 p. M. 
Oakley was the first to come to point; no birds were 
found. They had been seen to leave the ground over 
which he was working. Rodfield made a beautiful 
back while Oakley was on point. Rodfield was the 
better in style and range, though neither did much 
work and both missed chances. They were ordered 
up at 3:50. 

This was the last brace down for the day, and, as it 
afterwards appeared, the last brace in the Derby. At 
the conclusion of this heat the judge inquired of ihe 
handlers if any of them objected to being put down 
again, and objection being heard he announced that 
no more heats would be run on that day. In this 
series the dogs wero in charge of the same handlers 
who had them in the first series. 

After dinner the winners were announced as follows: 
Cuba Jr. first, Rod's Lark second, Ned Funston third. 



f J ANDARY 25, 1902 



SUMMARY. 

Santa Maria (Cal.), January 13, 1902. Pacific 
Coast Field Trial Club's nineteenth annual trials. 
The Derby — For Pointers and Setters whelped on or 
after January 1, 1900. Entrance $10, $10 additional to 
start. Thirty-five nominations, seven starters (four 
English Setters, three Pointers). Purse, $350. $175 
to first, $105 to second, $70 to third. 

I. 

Clinton E Worden's black, white and tan dog Wade Earl 
(Dave Earl-Aceelerando), bred by R. V Fox, Harrisburg. Ky ; 

whelped February, 1900 with W. B. Coutts' (Kenwood, Cal ) 

black and white Pointer bitch Kenwood Rose (Kris Kringle-Plain 
Sister), whelped September 1, 1900. Bred by owner. 

H. L. Betten's white, black and tan English Setter bitch Rod' s 
Lark (Rodtield-Count's Diana), whelped September 7. 1900. Bred 

by owner with W. B. Coutts' white and liver Pointer dog Ned 

Funston (Kris Kringle-Plain Sister), whelped September 1. 1900. 
Bred by owner. 

F. J. Stone's orange and white English Setter dog Diana's Rod- 
Held (Rodtield-Count's Diana), whelped September 7, 1900. Bred 

by H L. Betten with Stockdale Kennels' (Bakers-field) liver 

and white Pointer dog Cuba Jr. (Cuba of Kenwood- Florida), 
whelped March 13, l'JOO. Bred by owner. 

W. W. Van Arsdale's white, black and tan dog Oakley's Pride 
(Oakley Hill-Gypsy Queen), whelped June, 1900. Bred by C. VV. 
Tway, Irwin, O. A bye. 

II. 

Kenwood Rose with Rod's Lark. I Diana's Rodfield with Oakley's 
Ned Funston with Cuba Jr. | Pride. 

RESULT. 

First, Cuba Jr.; second, Rod's Lark; third, Ned Funston. 
All-Age Stake. 

The drawing for the All-Age Stake was held on 
Monday evening, January 13th, after the Derby win- 
ners had been announced, and fifteen dogs paid the 
starting fee. The order of the drawing resulted as 
follows: 

Stockdale Kennels' English Setter bitch Peach Mark 
II. with W. W. Van Arsdale's English Setter dog 
Count's Mark. 

Stockdale Kennelt' Pointer dog Cuba Jr. with T. J. A. 
Tiedemann's English Setter bitch Northern Huntress. 

W. W. Van Arsdale's English Setter bitch Shadow 
with Stockdale Kennels' Pointer dog Bow's Son. 

Stockdale Kennels' Pointer bitch Jacuba with W. 
W. Van Arsdale's English Setter bitch Peach Blossom. 

J. E. Terry's English Setter bitch Lady with Stock- 
dale Kennels' Pointer dog Cuba's Zep. 

Stockdale Kennels' Pointer bitch Nellie Wilson with 
J. E. Lucas' Pointer dog Alec C. 

W. W. Van Arsdale's Pointer dog Dr. Daniels with 
Clinton E. Worden's Pointer bitch Pearl's Jingle. 

J. E. Eucas' Pointer bitch Fan Go drawing the bye. 

Tuesday, January 14th. Conditions were even more 
favorable than on the preceding day, the sun being 
obscured by clouds, and a cool breeze blowing. Better 
bird work was the order of the day, though the dry- 
ness of the ground somewhat interfered with the dogs 
showing at their best. An early start was made and 
the first brace was cast off at a point near where the 
last heat of the Derby had been run. 

Peach Mark II. — Count's Mark. This was the first 
brace down, being cast off at 9:10. The former was 
handled by Dodge aud the latter by Babcock. Count 
found first after being down but a few minutes and 
pointed a bevy in a very creditable manner, being per- 
fectly staunch when the birds were flushed. The dogs 
soon got into tangled brush and were brought again 
to open ground, but though birds were seen no more 
bird work was done. Count had the better style, his 
range however being rather limited. Peach Mark II. 
appeared to be ailing and did not make much of a 
showing. Up at 9:55. 

Cuba Jr.— Northern Huntress. Down at 10:04, the 
former handled by Dodge, the latter by Coutts. Cuba 
was the first to find, pointing a bevy in comparatively 
open ground in full view of the spectators. This piece 
of work was much admired, as the dog caught the 
scent while in the act of leaping over low brush and 
staunchly held his point. Northern Huntress showed 
better range than the Pointer, also staying out better, 
and after boing out of sight of the judge for some little 
time was found on point. The birds flushed and she 
was steady to wing. In this heat both dogs missed 
opportunities to point, birds being plentiful and cover 
good. Cuba had the better of the heat on bird work. 
Up at 10:52. 

Shadow — Bow's Son. Down at 10:55. The former 
was in charge of Babcock, the latter in charge of 
Dodge. Soon after being cast off Bow's Son came to 
point and was nicely backed by Shadow. However, 
no birds were raised. He followed this by pointing 
and flushing a single. Shadow, while a speedy and 
easy moving bitch, seemed unable to locate, though 
many opportunities were given her. Up at 11:35. 
Little work on birds in the heat. 

Jacuba — Peach Blossom. Jacuba handled by Dodge, 
Blossom by Babcock. Down at 12:32 in rather heavy- 
cover. Blossom, a very speedy and stylish bitch, was 
soon out of sight in the high brush. She was found 
by the judge in the vicinity where birds bad been seen 
to flush, and upon sighting the judge stiffened into 
point. Sent on scattered birds Blossom made a point 
on a single and was staunch. Both dogs had flushes. 
Blossom in range, style, speed and stamina outclassed 
anything seen up to that time and had much the better 
of the heat. Up at 1:05. 

Lady — Cuba's Zep. Lady was handled by Coutts, 
while Dodge looked after Zep. Cast off at 1:30 in 
pasture land, covered in places by high brush. Zep at 
first showed great speed and ran»e. He hunted with 
a low nose, but worked diligently, having two or three 
points on singles to his credit at the end of the heat. 
Lady nicely backed one of Zep's points and both dogs 
were steady to shot. Lady did not display anything 
like her form of last year. Up at 2:07. 

At the conclusion of this heat a move was made to 
the river bed grounds, four miles nearer town, and the 
first brace there put down was: 

Nellie Wilson— Alec C. Down at 3 P. M. Nellie 
Wilson handled by Dodge, Alec C. by Lucas. Nellie 
Wilson was suffering from a stiff shoulder, but held 
gamely to her work. The dogs were first cast off on 
open ground, but soon worked over to the river bank 
where the birds were hiding among the willows. In 
this heat Nellie made a number of nice points, being 
steady to wing and shot, and several times was backed 
by Alec. She retrieved a bird which her handler 



January 25, 1902J 



9 



killed. Alec also had several points to his credit, 
birds lying close, but did not take ad vantage of all 
opportunities offered. Alec had the better range. Up 
at 3:40. . mL _ 

Dr. Daniels— Pearl's Jingle. Off at 3:45. The Doctor 
was handled by Babcock, .Jingle by Lucas. They were 
put down in open ground and at once started with 
great speed and range. Both are stylish workers. 
This was the fastest and widest ranging brace yet 
down. After a gruelling race of forty-five minutes 
without finding birds, both dogs showing remaricable 
speed and range as well as stamina, often being from 
one-quarter to one-half milo from their handlers, Dr. 
Daniels found and pointed a bevy. He was so ex- 
hausted that he dropped flat on his point, rising to bis 
feet when his handler approached. Jingle camo up 
and backed honestly. Both were staunch when the 
birds were flushed. Ordered up at 4:20. 

At the conclusion of the heat the judge stated that 
in his experience he could only remember one or two 
races where a brace of dogs had made a finer showing. 

The bye dog, Fan Go, handled by Lucas, had been 
put down immediately after lunch under supervision 
of Mr. John H. Schumacher and had two points on 
sins-les to her credit. She had good speed and ranged 
well. 

This concluded the day's sport; and in the evening 
the judge announced that eight dogs would be carried 
into the second serie8. 

SECOND SERIES. 

Wednesday, January loth. An early start was 
made for new grounds among the foothills about eleven 
mil's east of town, where it was reported that birds 
were plentiful and cover good. This report was veri- 
fied when the grounds were reached. They were roll- 
ing and hilly, altogether dissimilar to those which had 
previously been used. Cover was good and birds were 
there in abundance. It was, however, impossible for 
teams to follow the dogs and the spectators either rode 
or followed on foot, sometimes being able to see an 
entire heat from some elevated position. Weather 
favorable. - _ 

Dr. Daniels— Cuba Jr. Down at 0:40. Dr. Daniels 
was the first to point on a single. A bevy was flushed 
and it seemed that one or other of the dogs should 
have located it. But little bird work was done although 
many birds were seen. Dr. Daniels had better range 
and stayed out better than Cuba, who did not show 
as well as he did in his Derby heats. They were 
ordered up at 10:45. 

Count's Mark— Northern Huntress. Down at 10:55. 
Huntress first found and hunted a bevy, Count imme- 
diately after pointing a single. He also made two 
flushes but stopped to wing on each occasion. Huntress 
had the better speed and range and worked better on 
birds. This brace was down nearly an hour. 

Peach Blossom— Pearl's Jingle. This was the first 
brace after lunch, being put down at 12:35. Both 
ranged wide and well and covered a great deal of 
ground. During the heat both dogs had a point on 
singles. Peach later slowed up and Jingle outranged 
and outlasted her, while Blossom was the more stylish. 
Little bird work was done, yet many birds were raised 
by those following. This brace was also down nearly 
an hour. 

Fan Go— Lady. Down at 1:38. Neither dog showed 
much speed or range in this heat. After being down 
for some time Lady made a couple of nice points on 
singles in good cover and was staunch. This was 
about the only bird work done in the heat. Both dogs 
missed opportunities. 

THIRD SERIES. 

Northern Huntress-Peach Blossom. This was the 
only brace down in the third series, and it was evident 
to those who had closely followed the trials that the 
two bitches were running for third place Blossom is 
better in style and range but was not the equal of 
Huntress in bird work, the latter having three points 
to her credit in the heat. This, in the opinion of the 
judge, fully offset Blossom's superiority in style and 
range. The dogs were in charge of the same handlers 
throughout the series of the stake. 

At the conclusion of the heat the judge announced 
his decision as follows: First, Dr. Daniels; second, 
Pearl's Jingle; third, Peach Blossom and Northern 
Huntress. 

The decision of Judge Balmer met with general 
approval, and no criticism whatever was heard rela- 
tive thereto. 

SUMMARY. 

Santa Maria, Cal., Jan. 13th, 14th, 1002. Pacific 
Field Trial Club's nineteenth annual trials. Ail-Ago 
Stake, open to all. Nineteen nominations, fifteen start- 
ers (nine Pointers, six Setters). Entrance at $10, $10 
additional to start. Purse, $340. $170 to first, $102 to 
second, $68 to third. 

I. 

Stockdale Kennels' lemon and white English Setter bitch Peach 
Mark II (Ch. Count Gladstone IV.-Peach Mark), whelped March 

2, 1899. Bred by W. W. Van Arsdale with W. W, Van Ars- 

dale's white, black and tan English Setter dog Count's Mark (Ch. 
Count Gladstone IV -Peach Mark), whelped March 2, 1899. Bred 
by owner. 

Stockdale Kennels' liver and white Pointer dog Cuba, Jr., (Cuba 

of Kenwood-Florida), whelped March 13, 1900. Bred by owner 

w ith T. J. A. Tiedemann's English Setter bitch Northern 

Huntress (Ch. Joe Cummings-Mecca II.), whelped August 29, 1899. 
Bred by W. W. Titus, West Point, Miss. 

W. W. Van Arsdale's white, black and tan English Setter bitch 
Shadow (Ch. Count Gladstone IV.-Peach Mark), whelped March 2, 

1899. Bred by owner with Stockdale Kennels' liver and 

white Pointer dog Bow's Son (Sam's Bow-Countess V.), whelped 
May ?, 1899. Bred by E. B. Horning, Marysville. 

Stockdale Kennels' liver and white Pointer bitch Jacuba (Culm 

of Kenwood-Jacquina), whelped July 18, 1899. Bred by owner 

w ith W. W. Van Arsdale's white and tan English Setter bitch 

Peach Blossom (Ch Count Gladstone IV.-Peach Mark), whelped 
March 2, 1899. Bred by owner. 

Jos E. Terry's lemon and white English Setter bitch Lady (Ch. 
Count Gladstone IV.-Peach Mark), wholped March 2, 1899. Bred 

by W. W. Van Arsdale with Stockdale Kennels' black and 

tan Pointer dog Cuba's Zep (Cuba of Kenwood-Jacquina), whelped 
January — , 1899. Bred by owner. 

Stockdale Kennels' liver and white Pointer bitch Nellie Wilson 
(Plain Sam-Dolly Dee II.), whelped January 20, 1898. Bred by Dr. 

Daniels with Mt. View Kennels' liver and whito Pointer dog 

Alee C. (Glenbeigh-Saddlebags), whelped January 5, 1898. Bred 
by A. F. Colvin. 

W. W. Van Arsdale's lemon and white Pointer dog Dr. Daniels 
(Plain Sam-Dolly Dee II ), whelped May — , 1898 with Clinton 



E. Wordeu's Pointer dog Ponrl's Jingle (Young Jingo-Pearl's Dot 
(II.), whelped August 6, 1899. Bred by Geo. Gray. 

Mt. View Keunels' white and tan Pointer bitch Fan Go (Young 
Jingo-Abdallah Kan), whelped July 10, 1800. Bred by J. B. Turner, 
Chicago. A bye. 

II 

Dr Daniels with Cuba Jr. I Peach Blossom with Pearl's 

Count's Mark with Northern Jingle. 
Huutress. I Fan Go with Lady. 

III. 

Northern Huntress with Peach Blossom. 
RESULT. 

First, Dr. Daniols: second. Pearl's Jingle; third, Peach Blossom 
and Nortuern Huntress. 



Field Trial Notes. 

The winning dogs in the All-Age at Santa Maria 
last week are mentioned as follows by one of the gen- 
tlemen present: 

Dr. Daniels, winner of first, is a handsome, wide- 
ranging dog, which hunts his ground vvith ease and 
judgment and is high class in every particular. His 
work has shown he is the equal of any of the Eastern 
Pointers, and it is likely he will bo sent on the circuit 
next year. 

Pearl's Jingle is also stylish and wide-ranging and 
runs with a high head, although not as fast as Dr. 
Daniels. The two Setters, Peach Blossom and North- 
ern Huntress, are very much alike in color and size. 
They can hardly be distinguished one from the other 
while in action. Blossom, however, has a bit the best 
of Huntress in style and seems a trifle more earnest 
in her work, otherwise there seems little to choose 
between them. 

When Dr. Daniels and Pearl's Jingle were put down 
it seemed as if the best had been kept for the last, for 
this brace of Pointers put up one of the finest races 
ever seen in a field trial. They ran at a side-splitting 
pace for forty-five minutes, ranging from one-quarter 
to one-half mile and finished with Dr. Daniels on a fine 
bevy point, Jingle backing beautifully. The judge 
complimented the handlers on the fine showing made 
by the dogs. 

Dustproof Harry, the irrepressible, had to be re- 
minded several times during the heats that he was not 
running the meeting; in fact, the judge once, in a 
gentlemanly and courteous manner, suggested that 
the club committee appoint one man to give orders 
and direct affairs and he would know what to do. He 
added, in deserved sarcasm, that until that arrange- 
ment was made he preferred to and would do the judg- 
ing himself. A jackass does love to eat thistles. This 
diet is palatable and fattening to the jack himself, and 
is also a source of intense amusement to the observant 
genus homo. 

Apropos of the insatiable habit of the "Special 
Agent" to "butt in," we cannot refrain from recount- 
ing the story of the eminent kennelauthority when he 
was honored by an unsuspecting and indulgent club of 
Eastern sportsmen, who, to their lasting chagrin, 
courteously allowed the Coast visitor to preside 
in the saddle. The story told by the judge (?) 
upon his return is entirely different from that 
recounted by a Los Angeles sportsman, "who was 
present at the Eastern Field Trials three or four 
years ago and had, on his return here, an amusing 
story to relate concerning the self-constituted Pacific 
Coast authority on field trials. The Coast wise man 
and field trial authority had attended the club trials 
a year or two previously and being an unknown quan- 
tity, save for the persistent heralding of his great 
abilities, coming from his own spout and pen — he was 
given the opportunity of acting as one of the judges. 
'Fools rush in where angels fear to tread.' When the 
local Dogberry arrived here again his stories were 
bombastic and grandiloquent and a few of those who 
did not know him were inclined to think he was 'some 
punkins on bird dogs.' Tho gentleman who pricked 
the bubble on his return from Newton had heard noth- 
ing but self-praising eulogistic stories and when he met 
the Eastern sportsmen and spoke of our windy friend's 
judging according to his information, he was heard 
with astonishment which was followed by hearty 
laughter. One and all the Eastern sportsmen were 
unanimous in saying that the judging by our Coast 
oracle was the most ludicrous exhibition of field trial 
judging and absolute ignorance of tho sport that it had 
been their misfortune ever to witness. After what 
they had been led to expect and understanding the 
standard required of a judge of field trials, their in- 
dignation and astonishment at the conceit and pre- 
sumption of the Pacific star of dogdom was supremo. 
Even at this day it is only neeessary to remotely refer 
to the great man's work in the saddle to provoke the 
sarcastic risibilities of those familiar with tho history 
of the trials that year. In mentioning this incident 
wo will be at the pains of explaining that we do not 
refer to H. II. Briggs, who has judged several Eastern 
trials with distinction and ability." 



Distemper has taken hold of a number of tho dogs 
that wero at Santa Maria. It is behoved the disease 
emanated from a stable whoreseveral dogs were placed 
for a night or two when tho handlers arrived at Santa 
Maria. An ailment, distomper, it is claimed, was somo- 
what prevalent among the Santa Maria horses. The 
theory has been advanced that tho dogs caught the 
distomper from the horses. It is a well known fact 
that colts and' horses aro subject to distemper and 
other similar sicknesses, whether it is transferable or 
not, by contagion, from the equine to the canine, is a 
matter we will not horo attompt to go into, it ia cer- 
tain, however, that several good dogs died of dii- 
temper, caught at Santa Maria, and some other dogs 
are now down with it. 



Jackson's Napa Soda is sold in every city, town and 
hamlet in the State. 



Verona Cash, a handsome stylish littlo bitch, owned 
by Armand De Courtoux, is down with dropsy and 
will probably soon succumb to the sickness. 

The first two days' trials wore held on tho Oso Flaco, 
and tho third day on Section 16, southeast of town, 
which was found to be the hotter location of the two. 



Fox Terrier Fanciers Meet. 

The Pacific Fox Terrier Club hold a regular meeting 
upon last Monday evening at No. 41 Sutter street, N. 
H. Hickman in the chair and Messrs. Harley, Moore, 
Ford and Martin present. J. G. Morgan and J. L. 
Cunningham of San Francisco and W. B. Fechheimer 
of Portland, Oregon, wero elected members. 

Tho special prizes won by members' dogs at the 
recent Oakland show were distributed as follows: $5 to 
C. K. Harley's Vibo; $5 to W. W. Moore's Vina Belle; 
$5 to J. W. Murphy's Woodlawn Two-Spot. 

The entries for the second division Produce Stakes 
closed with the following: 

1. C. K. Harley's Quoen Dance (Norfolk Victorious- 
Norfolk Valse) whelped July 15, 1901, to Vibo (Visto- 
Egssford Dora) five dogs and one bitch. 

2. C. K. Harley's Carmencita (Cambridge Punch- 
Maybelle) wholped July 25, 1901, to Champion Aldon 
Swagger (D'Orsay-Dusky Pearl) five dogs. 

3. W. F. Foster's Lillian Sage (Warren Sage-Lillian 
Stroller) whelped July 12, 1901, to Norfolk Trueman 
(Champion Norfolk Veracity-Norfolk Jewel) three 
dogs. 

4. Robert Armstrong's Golden Spattor (Warren 
Sage-Blemton Spinaway) whelped July 5, 1901, to 
Champion Aldon Swagger, one dog and four bitches. 

5. G. J. M. E. D'Aquin's Aldon Kitty (Von Voit- 
Dusky Pearl) whelped July 17, 1901, to Aldon Artist 
(Wawaset Actor-Aid on Radiance), two dogs and two 
bitches. 

6. J. P. Brown's Richmond Favour (St. Leger- 
Richmond Luck) whelped July 6, 1901, to Raby Duval 
(Claude Duval ) two dogs and four bitches. 

7. E. Courtney Ford's Eclipse Blanche (Bend d'Or- 
Hedford Birch) whelped to Norfolk Trueman 

8. N. H. Hickman's Irene (St. Vigilant-Elmwood 
Grace) whelped July 29, 1901, to Warron Sceptic 
(Claudian-Warren Spray) three dogs and three bitches. 

9. N. H. Hickman's lone (Scorcher-Lillian Sage) 
whelped October, 1901, to Norfolk Trueman three 
bitches. 



DOINGS IN DOGDOM. 

A fine litter of Fox Terrier puppies is reported from 
Wandee Kennels. They were whelped on December 
29th last and muster two dogs and three bitches nicely 
marked. The dam is Wandee Delight, she by Norfolk 
Victorious out of Norfolk Tattors. Tho sire of the 
youngsters is Vibo. 

Dogs in India are subject to dangers from which 
their English brethren are exempt. Colonel Anderson 
of Worlee lost his favorite fox terrier, Lucy, under 
somewhat peculiar circumstances. The bitch "spot- 
ted" a fine big cobra making for the roots of a tree in 
the Colonel's compound, and promptly dashed off to 
kill the reptile. Unfortunately Lucy seized the snako 
just as it had got its head into the hole, but rather 
low down the reptile's back, and in drawing it out of 
the holo to give it a shake and break its back, the 
snake just managed to get its head round and inflict a 
bite on the plucky little dog's cheek. Poor Lucy 
rolled over on her side and died within a minute of 
being bitten, and the snako got away into the roots of 
the tree. It is gratifying to learn that tho Colonel 
had the tree cut down there and then, and after some 
hours of steady digging the snake was unearthed and 
promptly dispatched. 

Another quite recent Indian dog story is tho account 
of a curious accident that befell a fine English Grey- 
hound. This dog, with another, had been exercised 
by the kennel boy, one being on tho chain, tho other 
loose. The latter spied a young kid in a field, and be- 
ing newly imported and therefore not used to tho 
Indian " Bakhri, " startod off to course it. Catching 
it up in a fow strides the hound cleverly picked it up 
and treated it as a hare in the most approved style, 
threw it up, dislocating its spine and killing it on the 
spot; but in so doing the hound also broko its own 
spine, and whilst the kid rolled over on one side the 
hound did ditto on the other, and both lay dead in tho 
field. The death of the hound appears to have been 
caused in this instance through the weight of its 
quarry being too much for the hound, and thus caus- 
ing the dislocation and rupture of the spinal cord. 



County Game Laws in Force. 



The present State Game and Fish Laws are in force 
and unchanged in tho following counties: 

Alameda. Monterey, Solano, 

Colusa, Santa Cruz, San Joaquin, 

Contra Costa, San Benito, Sonoma. 

Merced. 

The following counties have adopted ordinances in 
regard to fish and game, and which are now in force 
as follows: 

Fresno— Quail, Nov. 1 to Feb. 1. 

Marin— Male deer, Aug. 1 to Sept. 15. Quail, Oct. 15 to Jan. 15. 
Shooting on county roads or in cemeteries prohibited. Tho use of 
"pump" gun, repeating shotgun or any kind of magazine shotgun 
for hunting in the county is prohibited. 

Monterey— Sea gulls and blue cranes, killing of prohibited. Use 
of guns of larger calibor than 10-gauge prohibited. 

Santa Clara— Quail. Oct. 8 to Fob. 1. 

San Mateo-Quall, Nov. 1 to Dec. 1. Rail, Oct. 15 to Nov. 15 
Shooting from boats at blgh tide prohibited. 



10 



[January 25, 1902 



Hunting Notes. 

On Tuesday next most sportsmen will have put away 
their field guns until the fall open season is in again- 
Those who still desire a few days' further shooting 
will h ve an opportunity on English snipe and geese, 
there being no close season on these birds. 

The dry season has given the duck hunter many 
chances for a good shoot. The birds left the dry in- 
terior for the baited ponds and feeding grounds in the 
marsh and tidelands contiguous to the bay shores, and 
also the tule sections of the Sacramento and San .loa. 
quin basins. 

One of the best shoots noted for some time was the 
lucky experience of James Maynard and a guest at 
the Canvasback Gun Club's ponds on last Sunday. 
The rain of the previous evening deterred the other 
members from making a visit to their preserve. Results 
the next morning proved that they had made a wrong 
guess concerning the movements of the birds. Ducks 
were plentiful enough to have allowed two guns in each 
of four ponds with an assurance of the limit bag to 
each shooter by 10 o'clock in the morning. 

The party left the club house before daylight on 
Sunday morning; walking down the railroad track 
they soon reached the shooting ground. Maynard 
selected Pond No. 1 for his shoot and leaving his guest 
in charge of Keeper Dan Sweeney was soon lost to sight 
in the darkness as he struck off to the right over the 
sedgy morass, following a familiar trail to where his 
boat was located. The other shooters soon arrived at 
their rendezvous and taking a tule-splitter the two 
push-polod through a short channel and across the 
shallow pond, where the guest was soon installed in a 
comfortable box blind and Keeper Sweeney then placed 
out a big bunch of decoys, afterwards getting into 
another box blind close to his companion. 

Ducks were in evidence from the start, when the 
two hunters left the track and walked ten yards to the 
boats, their ad vent caused hundreds ol ducks to fly 
away from the pond, in fact until it was light enough, 
legally, to shoot, the presenco of many birds was con- 
stantly indicated by the whistling of their pinions as 
they flew about in many directions. The soft tenor 
piping of the teal was answered by the guttural quack 
of the spoonbill and later on the sprigtail added its 
querulous notes to the concert. Mudhens, impudent 
and plentiful, were on hand at all times. 

While the decoys were being placed out the teal 
commenced to pitch into the water, alighting in sev- 
eral instances within a few feet of the boat and its 
occupant. During the morning teal would alight fre- 
quently among the decoys and not more than twenty 
feet from the concealed shooter, who had the oppor- 
tunity of studying their movements and watching 
them for some little time. A number of doubles were 
made by the shooter who suddenly arising in the 
blind, the teal Would take to wiug, generally giving a 
straight away shot and another easy one when the 
bird selected for the second barrel would commence to 
climb after the report of the first barrel. 

Later on in the morning the sprigtails came in and 
worked to the decoys in bolter style than they could 
be trained for it, were such a thing possible. Flying 
high at first and with craning neck and head carried 
first to one side then to the other, the bird would 
sweep around in two or three wide but diminishing 
circles and then come in over the pond just about 
thirty yards high — when a careful sighting and proper 
lead would enable the shooter to drop the bird right 
in the pond. In this pond the limit was shot before !> 
o'clock. Maynard also shot his limit in No. 1 pand by 
8:30. 



San Francisco Kennel Club. 

At a mooting of the San Francisco Kennel Club held 
on Tuesday evening the following officers were elected 
for the ensuing year: A. B. Spreckels, President; John 
E. de Ruyter, First Vice-President; E. Courtney Ford, 
Second Vice-President; N. H. Hickman, Secretary- 
Treasurer; Chas. K. Harley, Director. The Board of 
Directors will constitute the Bench Show Committeo 
which committee will appoint the superintendent for 
the next bench show. The Superintendent, it is pro- 
posed, will have full and complete charge of the busi- 
ness and every detail pertaining to the arrangement 
and conduction of the show, with the exception only 
of selecting the judge or judges. 

The Bench Show Committee were to meet yesterday 
for the transaction of some preliminary business, 
selecting dates for the spring show and the appoint- 
ment of a superintendent. 

The selection of the judge or judges and also of the 
superintendent of the next show is speculative up to 
this dato, however we do not believe that we are 
straining a point in mentioning the names of Mr. J. J. 
Lynn as in line for Fox Terrier judging and L. A 
Klein as judge of somo other breeds. It would not be 
a great surpri-'e should Mr. Klein be requested to act 
in the capacity of superintendent. 

An effort will be made to have the show this year at 
an earlier date than heretofore. It is claimed that, as 
a rule, just about the time in May when our local show 
is held many people have either left town or are getting 



ready to go. If the show dates were made for two or 
three weeks earlier, in April, this would induce not 
only a larger entry of dogs but an increased gate 
attendance. 

The arguments advanced b- Mr. Hickman in this 
respect we believe to be good ones. 

The club might also take the initiative in not follow- 
ing another stereotyped custom, and that is, instead 
of having a four-day show, to cut it down one or even 
two nays. The most indifferent analysis of this prop- 
osition is almost convincing that there is no necessity 
out here for a four-day affair. The saving in expenses 
of hall, light, help, etc., is alone a feature that should 
make the innovation acceptable. Since the club has 
been organized there has not been a single paying 
bench show. There is no reason why the club mem- 
bers should always be called upon to contribute their 
quota, or a part of it to the guaranteed fund. Bench 
shows, under far less auspicious patronage and advan- 
tages than the present club has enjoyed, have been 
paying ventures in the past and under proper man- 
agement could be again. 

A number of prominent members of the club pro- 
pose to send their dogs to the northern shows this 
year, showing under P. K. L. rules. This is in a 
friendly sportsmanlike spirit and will be done for the 
mutual interest of Coast fanciers. 



A communication from Manager R. M. Dodge, of 
Stockdale Kennels, says: "Everything goes on nicely 
here at the kennels, and I expect a fine litter of pup- 
pies about the 23d inst. They are by Cuba of Ken- 
wood -Petronella. She is by Young Jingo-Florida; 
she is half sister to Cuba Jr. I expect to breed four 
rooro bitches in a few days, and if the demand for 
Pointer puppies keeps up I will have no trouble in 
disposing of them. The Pointers are on top this year, 
and if they keep on improving as they have in the 
last few years the Setter will nave to look out for his 
laurels.'' 



Striped Bass Notes. 

The sport of striped bass fishing will receive a new 
impetus when the salt water enthusiasts become aware 
of the big catches of the gamey fish 3aught on Friday 
by W. Li. McFarland and on Friday and Saturday 
laft week, by Al M. Cumming. McFarland fished San 
Antonio slough from 10:30 in the morning until about 
3 P. M. and landed a catch of twelvo fine fish. The 
largest bass scalled pounds. The total weight o 
the catch was 80J pounds. When he left the slough 
to catch a train for the city the fish were still eagerly 
taking the trolling spoon. During the time these fish 
were caught, it was comparatively low water — tho last 
of the ebb and the first of the flood tide. They were 
all taken on a Wilson spoon. 

Mr. Cumming and Frank Ireland were fishing in tho 
sair.o water on Friday and at the time McFarland left 
had not landed many fish. During that afternoon and 
a part of tho day following, tho total catch was twenty 
fish, which turned the scales at 110 pounds. Cumming 
claims that the best time to hook the bass is the time 
three hours before and three hours after low water. 



A number of anglers will try San Antonio creek 
again to-morrow for bass. 



Tho San Francisco Striped Bass Club held the annual 
meeting and banquet on Tuesday evening. A number 
of prizes won during the past season were given to the 
various successful fishermen. 



Steelhead Fishing Notes. 

The anglers on Russian river have had a merry 
time of it up to the middle of the present week. The 
record for two day's fishing, Saturday and Sunday, 
we believe, was 02 fine fish. The female fish were full 
of roe but were hardly ripe for spawning. It has been 
a noticeable fact that of the comparatively few fish 
which fought tho anglers on the river, the females 
were the ones who cut out the pace for the fishermen. 
For some reason, unknown to the angler, the buck 
steelheads this Boason show no more spirit than just 
so many lumps of liver. 

Since the seizure of the six nets by Deputies Cross 
and Welch the fish have had an opportunity to go up 
the river and loaf about the pools, waiting for the 
rising of the river after the rains. 

Another net was taken near the mouth of tho river 
by Cross on Sunday night last. The nets already 
taken were worth several hundred dollars. 

Last Sunday, in one pool the fish wore striking in 
nice manner. The first boats were soon joined by the 
whole river flotilla, some twenty boats in all. The ex- 
hilarating spectacle of nearly every rod being at work 
at tho same time was a scene to warm the cockles of 
an angler's heart. 

Among the lucky fishermen who landed fish were. 
Al Wilson and Alex T. Vogelsang, twelve fish; John 
Butler and Frank Marcus, twelve; Hart Williams, six; 
Mr. and Mrs. Davis, seventeen; M. J. Geary and 



Donald McRae, nineteen; J. B. Gilbert, four; J. O'Neil, 
five, L. Rondeau, eight. J. Gibson, ten on Saturday; 
J. A. Pariser and James Watt, eight; O. W. Jackson 
and Ed Painter five. 

The rains this week will materially break up the 
best fishing season on Russian river for the past four 
years. 

Several good sized steelhead have boon taken out of 
the ''White house" pool at Point Reyes recently. Re- 
ports from many Coast streams showed that the run 
of big steelheads was a large one, distributed over 
most of the available streams. 



The many friends of Secretary Horace Smith of the 
San Francisco Fly-Casting Club will be pleased to hear 
that the genial and esteemed sportsman was well 
enough this week to take a trip down town in a cab. 



Fishing at Bonnington Falls. 

[J. MAVNE BALTIMORE.] 

British Columbia affords a wide and fascinating field 
to the hunter and angler. To the nimrod, there is 
excellent hunting in many regions. British Columbia 
is noted topographically for its many lofty and rugged 
upheavals and the groat expanse of its forests. 

In tho mountains and woods are found noble as well 
as smaller game. Here are met the grizzly, bald-face 
and silver tip bear, the stately and graceful caribou 
other deer, the wolf, lynx, wildcat, wolverine and a 
variety of feathered game. 

But to the ardent angler, there is "ample scope" in 
which ho may fairly revel. There are all kinds of 
fishing except ocean angling. Of course, along the 
coast there is plenty of marine fishing; but we are 
speaking with special reference to inland water sport. 

Away from the Pacific Coast, British Columbia 
abounds in rivers, smaller streams and lakes. None 
of them are destitute of fish. On the contrary, the 
waters teem with speckled beauties. However, it must 
be said that of later years tho fish in some sections are 
very noticeably diminishing. Persistent fishing has 
drained tho finny resources of some of the streams and 
lakes; and now vigorous efforts ate being- made by tho 
authorities to put a check o:i the piscatorial ''record 
smashers." 

Probably one of the most favorite points in the 
Kootnais for casting the lure is to bo found at what is 
known as Slocan Crossing on Kootnai river. This is 
just below the famous Donnington Falls on that stream. 
The Kootnai is one of tho most beautiful and pictur- 
esque streams to be found in all British Columbia. It 
is a large stream taking its rise in the Kootnai lakes, 
and after many devious winding? pours its clear, cold 
floods into the lordly Columbia near tho international 
boundary. 

Excellent fishing is found in tho Kootnai lakes and 
Arrowhead lake but the best point is found at Slocan 
Crossing. 

A branch of tho Canadian Pacific Railroad extends 
from the great mining town of Rossland up to Nelson. 
This branch passes through the little smelter town of 
Trail, which is some eight miles east of Rossland. 
Slocan Crossing is about forty miles from Rossland and 
thirty from Nelson. The best point at which to fish is 
is just below the last of the famous falls. There are 
many large ragged rocks on both sides of the Kootnai 
river where safe footing may be found. The water is 
not very deep nor rough. At the proper season of 
the year great and exciting sport may be had below 
the falls. The fish rarely require any coaxing, they 
will jump at a hook almost as fast as it is dropped 
into the water. Both bait and flies are used. Trout 
from eight to sixteen inche9 long are caught almost by 
the ton. All, however, are not tho "Simon-pure" 
trout, a good percentage are salmon trout. They are 
a beautiful fish, and many esteem them as highly as 
either gennine lake or mountain trout. 

The fame of the fish caught at Slocan Crossing has 
spread far and wide, and there is an active demand for 
them. The fish supplies for Rossland, Nelson, Trail, 
Northport and other points come from the Kootnai, 
and actual tons are caught and shipped to these points 
during the season. 

A number of persons engage in supplying fish to the 
various markets during the spring and summer and 
do a lucrative business. Still, the Crossing is a favorite 
resort for the real sportsman — he who fishes for the 
pleasure and excitement without any thought of sordid 
gain or profit. 

The place is easily, rapidly and comfortably reached 
by rail. The region is a wild and picturesque one, 
and the view afforded by Bonnington Falls a sublime, 
magnificent one. Many during the heated term camp 
out near the stream and spend days in fishing and 
rambling though the woods and mountains which are 
near at hand. It has become of later years a favorite 
outing rendezvous. Large and small game are met in 
those regions. 

What has happened to the noble buffalo and other 
game animals may yet be repeated of the fish at these 
falls. Persistent and remorseless fishing will surely 
ere long exhaust the supply. It is noted that fish are 
growing scarcer each season. At no distant day even 
Slocan Crossing will bo literally "fished out." 

Jackson's Napa Soda untangles the feet. 



January 25, 1902] 



11 




THE FARM.* 



The Dairy Business in Kings County. 

[Hanford Sentinel.] 
We have received a careful estimate as 
to the amount of butter that was made in 
this county, or from milk produced in this 
county for 1901, and that estimate places 
the amount at 620 000 pounds, which at 
the average price realized amounts $142,- 
600. The cheese factory has probably 
paid to the dairymen for milk fully $25,000 
more, making an estimated distribution 
of money from the dairy for the season of 
$167,600. 

From thirty acres of ground in Lindley 
district, near Pajaro, John E. Trafton 
gathered 6543 sacks of potatoes — 218 sacks 
to the acre. It is a wonderful showing 
and it came in a year when such crops 
count— when spuds are of high value. 
The value of that crop is estimated at 
about $200 per arre. The I'ajaro valley is 
not given to blowing, but as some of her 
neighbors have been claiming records for 
field crops during 1901 this section has 
been offering a few '•exhibits" in the way 
i if enorTious crops per acre of apples, ber- 
ries, beets, onions, potatoes, etc., just to 
show that I'ajaro valley is yet a leader 
when it conies to crop records — and it ex- 
perts lo retain that distinction. — Pajuro- 
niun. 

FOR SALE. 

TTANDSOME 3-YEAR-OLD BAY STALLION, 
-CI COMBINATION by Diawood 2:11. dam by 
Wdkesdale 2:-.'W, second dam by Calabar 8559. 
This colt is uiceiy broken, has never been worked 
for speed but shows a wonderful way of going: can 
trot better than a 2:W clip. Price $225 if sold 
within 30 days. For further particulars address 
T. W. H YKM OW. San Jose. t ill. 

WANTED— TEAM OF MARES. 

pREAM COLOR OR (JOLDEN SORREL PRE- 
^ ferred. Must be stylish, well broken and 
speedy, perfectly sound and gentle, free from all 
vices. Give price and full particulars. Address 
A. A .careof Bkef.dkij and Sportsman, 36 Geary 
Street, San Francisco 

WANTED— A SINGLE FOOTER. 

"\ r ARE PREFERRED. PERFECTLY SOUND 
i.1 and gentle, free from all vices. Must be good 
size, very fast and easy; well broken to single foot. 
State price and full particulars. Address B. L., 
care of breeder and Sportsman, 36 Geary 
Street. San Francisco. 



A 




Burning , w 
Question 

NO LONGER. 

Chronic Scratches 
and Grease Heel.... 

Can be cured absolutely and permanently. 

VETERINARY PIXINE 



in its efficiency is a revelation. The highest trib- 
utes that can te paid are given to it as a cure for 
chronic and hopeless cases of Scratches, Sores and 
Skin Affections on horses and domestic animals. 
Sold under an absolute guarantee. Money back 
if it fails. 

2oz,25c; 8 oz , 50c; 5-lb. pkg., $4 

At all Druggists and Dealers, or sont prepaid 

A. W. HITT CO. 

PACIFIC COAST AGENTS, 

">!!) Mission St., San Francisco, Cal 

Troy Chemical Co., Manufacturers. Troy, N. Y. 



Percheron Stallions 



FOR SALE. 

Mufivp Snn foaled April 2*. It*: lie is a 

lauvc ouii, handsome black with brown 
points and was sired bv Raglan, 1st dam by 
Adolph, 2d dam by imp. Weluort, 3d dam by imp 
French Spy. Native Son is one of the most prom- 
ising young draft stallions in California, and is 
a sure foal getter. He was bred lo 23 mures last 
year and 21 of them are in foal. His six year 
old brother weighs 2<MS0 pounds, and Native Sou 
will be as largo at the same age 

Chief of Kneiphusen. gJ&SESS 

lion, bred by Joseph Blondin of Livermore, Ala- 
meda <?o., was sired by Raglan. First dam by 
Starlight, 2d dam by Adolph. 3d dam by French 
Spy. Raglan No 14,7311 was imported from France 
by Theo. Skillman Raglan was bred by Joseph 
Davignon of Grauctorie Department of Orue 
Three of Raglan's colts were shown in Livermorr 
on the 24th of February, l!KHl anil their average 
weight was 1856 pounds. Chief Kneiphusen was 
foaled March 5, IKH7, and took the first prize In the 
Sau Francisco and San Mateo Horse Show in 
Tanforau Park. He has been bred to T>2 mares and 
got 48 In foal. His colts can be seen at Livermore 
and at Redwood City When he is full grown hi? 
will weigh over 2100 pounds. 
For further particulars apply to or address 

II It GOECKEN, 

Hay, Grain and Feed Merchant, 
585-595 Fourth St., Sau Francisco. 



WANTED. 

A Gentleman's Driving Horse. 

'TROTTER OR PACER, FROM 10OO TO 1100; 

- 1 must be well bred, sound, kind and young, and I \ 
able to show a gait better than 2:30. State price, 
breeding, etc Address " Driver." care Breeder 1 
and Sportsman. i 

WANTED— A DRIVING MARE. 

■V1U3T BE GOOD SIZE, WELL BROKEN AND j 
speedy, perfectly sound and gentle, free from I 
all vices. State price and full particulars Ad- | 
dress B. L., care of Breeder and Sportsman, 36 | 
Geary Street, San Francisco. 



BOUGHT, SOLD AND EXCHANGED, 

f)N HAND NOW AT PARKER'S RANCH, 
" Lockeford. San Joaquin County 400 head of 
extra good Mules, from 3 to 8 years old, broken and 
unbroken, weighing from 900 to 1300 pounds. Ad- 
dress A. F. HOOKER, 327 SixthSt , San Francisco 



FOR SALE. 

AENT'S DRIVING MARE, AGE 6: COLOR 
^ Brown: height 16 hands; weight 1100: stand- 
ard bred; no mark: sired by Nushagak 25,939 at 
McLaughlin Ranch, Los Banos; trotting gait; 
thoroughly broke, kind and gentle; can trot very 
fast. Apply to 

NEVADA STABLES, 
1350 Market St., S. F. 



2:012 



2:02; 



HOW CAN YOU BEAT IT 
FOR THE MONEY? 

STAM B. 23444 

RECORD 2:1 1 ',. By STAMBOUL 5101, a trotting and show king; dam. Belle Medium 2:20. a 
great brood mare by Happy Medium, sire of the great all-round mare, Nancy Hanks 2:04, and other 
great ones: second dam by the hanosome sire Almont Lightning (sire of the dam of ZombroS*.!] and 
other great all-in-all animals, both on the turf and in the show rings; third dam by that sire of gamo, 
sound, handsome animals, Mambrino Patchen 58; fourth dam by that speed producing sire, Mambrino 
Chief 11: fifth dam by thatstylish and long distance racing horse, Mason's Whip. 

STAM B. is a line and suhstanaial upstanding bay, 15 3 hands tall, weighs llim pounds, and now 
rightly ranks among the most promising young sires of the land. That he is now in public service in 
California is a fact for which breeders may be grateful. He is already proving a sire of speed and 
gameness, together with size, superb style and high action, transmitting these qualities to every foal 
regardlessof dam. He is acknowledged by all who have seen him to be very near the real and ideal 
race horse and all-around sire. His racing qualities were beyond criticism, and all close observers 
know that in his blood are represented the kings and queens of the trotting turf and show rings. 

Payable at the end of June, with return privilege. 
Reduced rates to any one person breeding over threo 
Freight must be prepaid on all mares Season corn- 
No responsibility assumed for accidents or escapes. 



f 132,000 Deaths from 
! this alone. 

n One special danger menaces those who 
J' live well, who can use champagne and fine 
W liquors, and that is Uright's Disease. 
X Posted clubmen understand this so well 
"jf that many have tests made every few 
^ months Others drink nothing but dry 
wines. But still the deaths reported from 
Bright's Disoase and D ; abeies ate Increas- 
ing at a fearful rate. The last census re- 
ports show that since 1890 the increase has 
been nearly fifty per cent and that the 
deaths in the United Slates alone from 
above causes and diseases growing out of 
them last year reached the enormous num- 
ber of 132.000. 

Hence the importance of every clubman 
knowing thisono fact, viz.: That Uright's 
Disease and Diabetes are now lositively 
curable in about Wi% of all ca*e . The 
Fulton Compounds are now saving the 
lives of hundreds, and will, when better 
known, save the lives of thousands who 
are now with little hope. 
P Send for full descriptive pamphlets to 

I John J. Fulton Co. 

420 Montgomery St , 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Annual Clearance sale 

OF 

Ladies' Suits, 

Cloaks, Jackets, 

Capes and Waists 

At Tremendous Reductions. 

J. O'BRIEN & CO 

1144 Market Street. 



Terms for the Season, $40. 

mares. Pasturage for mares, $4 per month, 
mences February 1st and ends August 1, 1902. 
Address 

P. O. Box 121. 



SAMUEL GAMBLE, IMeasantoii, ( nl. 



2!04 



2:08 



THE STANDARD-BRED TROTTING STALLION 



BOODLE Jr. 



f BY BOODLE 2:12'/S, sire of Ethel Downs 2:10. 

Thompson 2:\4'4, and 4 others In 2:30 and hotter 
•( He by Stranger, sire of 33 in 2:30. 
Dam NINA II. by Electioneer, sire of Arion 2:07?4, Sunol 

2:08)4, Palo 2:08^, and 1(50 moro in 2:30 list. 



IIODDLE Jr. is one of the best bred, best looking and best stallions on the Pacific Coast. All of 
his get have size, style and speed. Ho will make the Season of 1902 at 

THE DAN PORTER LIVERY STABLE, WATSON VI LLE. 

Terms— S25 for the season ending July 1st. For further particulars address 

F. M. HAMMETT, WatsonvlUe, Cal. 



MANHAJISB 



RED BALL BRAND. 

It Positively Cures Colic, Scouring and Indigestion 



A n ii r,ie,i Gold ftfadal 
At California state 
Fair IH!»2. 

Every horse owner who 
values his stock should 
constantly have a sup- 
ply of it on hand. It 
Improves and keeps 
stock in the pink of 
condition. 

Manhattan Food Co. 

1253 Folaom St., San FrancUco 
ABk your grocers or dealers for it. 



COCOANUT OIL CAKE 

THE BEST FEED FOR 

STOCK, CHICKENS AND PIGS 

For sale in lots to su<t by 

EL DORADO LINSEED OIL WORKS GO. 

08 California Street). San Franoinoo. Cal. 

T. £. BOCK 

MANUFAOTUKKH AND DEALER IN 

Harness, Saddles, Blankets, Etc. 

Horse Boots made to order. 

Track Work a specialty. . . 
2 1 1) Ellis St , bet. Mason and Taylor, S. F. 
**-Tolephone: Folsom 2982. 



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Meet Your Friends 
at the Palace Hotel 

Tourists and Travelers who 
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not obtainable in any other hotel 
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tho fjrill rooms, telegraph and 
telephone ofllces, writing rooms, 
barber shop, billiard parlor, car- 
riage office, book stand and type- 
writer offices. 

On one side of this immense 
hotel— tho largest in tho world — 
Lb the wholesale and manufactur- 
ing district; on the other thea- 
tres, retail stores, clubs, railroad 
offices, banks and newspaper 
buildings. 

Street cars to all parts of tho 
city — depots, ferries, Cliff House 
and parks — pass tho entrance. 

American Plan. European Plan 




New California Jockey Club 

Season 1901-1902 

OAKLAND RACE TfUCK 

Racing MONDAY, TUESDAY, WEDNESDAY 
THURSDAY, FRIDAY and SATURDAY 
RAIN OR SHINE. 
Five or More Kaces Kach Day. 

Races start at 2:15 p. m. sharp 

Fern boats leave San Francisco at 12 m , 12:30, 
1:00, 1:30, 2:00, 3:00 p. m., connecting with trains 
stopping at the entrance to the track. Last two 
cars on train reserved for ladles and their escorts. 
No smoking Buy your ferry tickets to Shell 
Mound. All trains via Oakland mole connect with 
San Pablo avenue electric cars at Seventh and 
Broadway, Oakland; also all trains via Alameda 
mole connect with San Pablo avenue cars at 
Fourteenth and Broadway, Oakland. These elec- 
tric cars go direct to the track in fifteen minutes. 

Returning trains leave tho track at 4:15 and 4:15 
p m. and immediately after tho last race. 

THOS H. WILLIAMS Jr., Pres. 
CIIAS F. PKICE, Sec'y anil Mgr. 

J. GOLDSTEIN 
343 Third Street 

pAYS TIIE HIGHEST PRICES for Gentle 
L men's good Cast-off Clothing. Give him a trial. 

GOODS 
NETTING 
FENCING 

West Coast Wire and Iron Works 

I7-l» Fremont St.. San Francisco, Cal 




The only triCrlll^n 




Junction : • £ tARNy _| 

-GeA&XiJl 



BLAKE, M0FFITT & T0WNE 



ni; m.khs i\- 



65-67-60-61 First Street, 8. F 

Telephone Main 190. 



ONEfr^ONE 



Tablet 




Pint 



[LINIMENT. 



LEG AND BODY WASH 

For Fevered Less, inflamed tendons, 
sprained ankles, cracked heels and all skin 
eruptions. Will not blisteror affect the kidneys 
Unexcelled as a brace. 
The most effective, 
Themost economical [ 
The most convenient, ) 

One tablet furnishes more genuino Witch Ha- 
zel than, is contained in 40 callous of the best 
extract, besides possessing other valuable In- 
gredients In its makeup. 

Put upln metal boxes In two sizes. 
Regular or $2 size contains 120 tablets. 6 
boxes for $ I O. Small or $1 size contains 
SO tablets. 6 boxes for $5. 

Sent post-paid on receipt of price. 

BOYCE TABLET CO., Terre haute, INQ 

for tale by Druggitta and Dealer* in Hamaaa & Tur/Qoods. 



12 



[January 25, 1902 



California State Agricultural Society, 

SACRAMENTO, CAL. 

SPECIAL HARNESS STALLION STAKE FOR 1905 

For the Get of Stallions that made Private or Public Service, 
Season of 1901, for their Foals of 1902. 

To Close Feb 15, 1902. 

The Race to be contested at State Fair at Sacramento 
in I905, when Foals are three years old 

Entrance fee for stallions to be the price tbat they made ^toaervto^lng $*££»<''WI. 
All other stallions that did not make public service, ontrance fee to be JiO. Stallions to be named 

^UfoSraWWpi \ffbiam entered in this stake to be eligible to be entered on June 
| |M8 Entrance"* pleach, of which $5 must accompany the entry, with breeding and name if 
any of foal ami a further payment of $10 March 1 1904, and a further payment of $h> each May 1. 
t$k and li floal payment of **> on the first day of August, IMS, and all colts making this payment 
■hall be eligible to start. Starters to be named in writing through the entry box 4 P. M. day before 

the The e 'californla State Agricultural Society to add an amount equal to all moneys paid in by the 
nominators of the stallions, not to exceed one thousand dollars. 

Entrance moneys paid in for stallions and added moneys shall be divided 60"„ to the end for 
trotting colts and W% to the end for pacing colts. No nominator allowed to start more than one colt 

e The nominator of any colts shall on May 1, 1905. then declare as to the trotting or pacing end he 
desires to start his colts All moneys paid in on colts transferred to the pacing division shall be 
segregated and placed to the credit of the pacing stake, and all other payments shall be placed to the 
credit of the trotting stake. , , . .. , 

All payments not made as they become due declares entry out and releases subscriber from 
further liability. • . 

Hopples barred in both classes Mile heats, three in five. 

Nominator of the sires of the winning colts in each end to receive I960, to be deducted from the 
money added by the Society and the money paid in as entrance on stallions, balance of the stakes 
and added money to be divided 50, 25, 15 and lt}%. 

Right reserved to declare two starters a walk-over, for stakes paid in only. 

When only two start they may contest for all entrance money paid in, not heretofore provided for. 
to be divided per cent to the winner and 33 S percent to the second horse. A horse distancing the 
Held in either class shall be entitled to all moneys paid in and 2o°„' only of the money added by the 
Society, not heretofore" provided for. . . ... ~. „ 

Open to all Stallions that have made private or public service in any of the following States. 
California, Oregon. Washington, Montana, Idaho, Colorado, Wyoming, Utah, Nevada and Arizona 
during the season of 1901. ,. _ ,, ., , . . 

No entry will be accepted except under this condition: That all disputes that may arise in 
regard to the conditions or contest of this race, shall be settled by the Board of Directors of the Cali- 
fornia State Agricultural Society, or those whom they may appoint, and their decision shall be final. 



Remember the date of Closing for Stallions is FEBRUARY 15, 1902. 



GEO. W. JACKSON. 

Secretary. 

Office— New Pavilon, Sacramento. 



A. B. SPRECKELS. 

President. 




NEIL W. 30371 

By BUY WII.KKS, (bun VERONICA 2:89 
by Alcona 730; second dam, Foutana (dam of Silas 
Skinner 2:17, Flora Belle 2:25, etc.) by Almont 33; 
next dam Fanny Williams by Abdallah 15; 
next dam by Denmark, thoroughbred, 

Kill. MAKE THE SEASON AT 

SANTA ROSA STABLES, 

SANTA BARBARA 



TERMS: $25 FOR THE SEASON. 



For particulars address 

H. F. It. YAH., Santa Barbara. 

Return Privileges. 




I Ycur stable is not complete without Ouinn's 1 
I Ointment. Au infallible cure fur all ordi- 
g nary horse afflictions. Follow the example 
set by the leading horsemen of the world and 
your stable shelf will always hold a bottle of 

Quinn's Ointment 

A. L.Thomaa, Snpt. Canton Farm, Joliet, 111., remarks, 
I enclose j-oo amount for six bottles of Quinn's Ointment. 



After _one year's trial must confess it docs all yon claim for 
it. For Curbs, Splints, Spavins, Windpaffs or Bunches. 

Price $1.00 per package. 
Sold by all druggists, 
- or sent by mail. 

I W. B. EDDY & CO., Whitehall, N. Y. 



TRY IT. 



Great Sale of Thoroughbreds 

AND TROTTING STOCK. 

Eighty Head of Stallions, Mares, Colts and Fillies, 



-KISOM THE- 



SONOMA STOCK FARM, 

Notice is hereby given that under authority of an order of Court, made December 3(1, 11)01, J B. 
Walden Jr., administrator of the Estate of James K. Chase, deceased, will sell at public auction 

TUESDAY, February 4, 1902, at 10 a. m. 

AT STOCK YARDS. 1732 MARKET ST., SAN FRANCISCO, 

all the great thoroughbred producing brood mares, stallions, yearlings, two, three and four year old 
cnltsand fillies, Including the stallion Dare by imp. Darebin, and the mares Marigold, Centella, Mis- 
chief and many others all royally bred in producing line-;. Also K) head of well bred trotters. 
Catalogues now ready. Stock at yard Friday, January 31st. 

W. H. HORD, Live Stock Auctioneer, 

1732 Market Street, Sau Franclaco 



GRAND DISPOSAL SALE OF STANDARD 

Trotting: Brood Mares 



(ALL IN FOAL) 



FROM THEi 
CELEBRATED 



PALO ALTO STOCK FARH 



On THURSDAY, January 30, 1902, at 11 a. m. 

FOLLOWING IS THE LIST TO BE SOLD AT THIS AUCTION: 



Color 

& Bex 



ch m 
b m 
br m. 
b m. 
b m 
br m. 
b m. 
b m. 
b m. 
ch m 
bl m. 
b m 
b m. 
bl m. 
ch m 
ch m 
bl m. 
b m. 
b m. . 
b m. . 
bl m. 
gr m 
ch m. 
b m. . 
bl m . 



1885... 
1896. . . 
1890... 
1898.. 
1887... 
1896... 
1897... 
189-2. . . 
1884... 
1882... 
1895. . 
1881. . . 
1880 . . 
1886 , . 
1883. . . 
1887. . 
1888... 
1881... 
1880. . . 
1898... 
1892. . . 
1885. . . 
1894. . . 
1887. . 
1897 . 



NAME. 



Anselma 2:29)4 

Asombrosa 

Bell Bird 2:22 

Cecino 

Clarion 2:255£.. . . 

Clarionelte 

Coralia 

Corsica 

Ella 2:29 

Elsie 

Giacinta 

Lady Agnes 

Lady Nutwo'd 2:34'/ 

Ladywell 2:l6',i 

Laura Drew 

Lena 

Lilly Thorn 

Morning Olory 

Nellie Benton 2:30 

Ororose 

Sabling 

Sonoma 2:28 

Svlla Barnes 

Wildmay 2:30 

Zorilla 



SIRK. 



Ansel 2:20 

Azmoor 2:20'/4 

Electioneer 

Mendociuo 2:19(4.. . 

Ansel 2:20 

Dexter Prince 

Boodle 2-l2!4 

Dexter Prince 

Electioneer 

General Benton. . . 
Guy Wilkes 2:15^.. 

Electioneer 

Nutwood 2:18iS£ 

Electioneer 

Arthurton 

Dexter Prince 

Electioneer 

Electioneer 

General Benton. . . 
Ora Wilkes 2:11 ... 
Guy Wilkes 2:15'^ 

Electioneer 

Whips 2:27!4 

Electioneer 

Dexter Prince 



DAM. 



Elaine 2:20 

Ahwaga 

Beautiful Bells 2:29'4 

Cecil 

Consolation 

Clarion fcC5Jf 

Coral 2:18H 

by Corsican 

Lady Ellen tH% 

Elaine 2:20 

Sproule 

Lady Lowell 

Lady Mae 

Lady Lowell 

Molly Drew 2:27 

Lena R 



Stallion Bred to in 1901 



Monbells 2:13", 

Mendocino 2:19(4 

Iran Alto 2:12^ 

Exioneer 

Mendocino 2:19'4 

Mendocino 2:19(4 

Monbells 2:23's 

Exioneer 

Nutwood Wilkes 2:16!J 

McKinuev 2:11^ 

Azmoor 2:M% 

Exioneer 

Mendociuo 2:19(J 

Monbells 2:23'J 

Mendocino 2:19(4 
Mendocino 2:19(4 



Lady Thorn Jr Exioneer 

Marti 1 Exioneer 

Norma j Monbells 2:23'* 

Melrose Mendooino 2:19' J 

Sable) Iran Alto 2:12* 

Sontag Mohawk Exioneer 

/fames I Monbells 2:23'J 

May 1 Nazote 2:2814 

Lilly Thorn Exioneer 



Color _ , . 
& Sex Foaled 



bs .. 
br g 
ch g 



NAME. 



Azmoor 2:20(4. 

A 1 tower 

Menzie 



SIRE. 



DAM. 



Electioneer Mamie C 

Altivo 2:18(4 Wildflower (2) 2:21 

Mendocino 2:19(4 | Lizzie 



Sale takes place at OCCIDENTAL HORSE EXCHANGE 

721 HOWARD ST., NEAR THIRD, SAN FRANCISCO. 

These mares can be seen at the farm until January 27th, when They will be at the Kxchango 
Send at once for catalogue to 

WM. G. LAYNG, Live Stock Auctioneer. 

AMATEURS 

who wish to improve their average at the trap, or 
increase their bag of game, are advised to try 

BALLISTITE 




Cartridges loaded with BALLISTITE can be obtained from the leading 
Cartridge Companies, Gun and Ammunition Dealers, or the Sole Agents. 



J. H, LAU &, CO. 



75 Chambers St,, New York City. 

A postal brings " Shooting Facts." 



Importers and Dealers In Fire Arms, Ammunition and Fencing Goods 



HOLSTEIN CATTLE. 

SLEEPY HOLLOW RANCH, SAN ANSELMO, MARIN CO,, CAL. 

I OFFER FOR SALE 

Johanna Sth's PAUL DE KOL 22372 H.F.H.B. 

His dam, Johanna 5th, has official record at 4 years: milk 
89.3 lbs. one day, 16,186.5 lbs. one year: butter, 23.50 lbs. 
- one week. His sire's dam, Duchess Clothilde, has official 
record: milk, 88.6 lbs. one day, 18,046.9 lbs. one year; 
butter, 23.05 lbs. one week. He was bred by Gillett cfc Son 
of Rosendale, Wis. His pedigree includes the greatest cows 
in the world. Having a number of his daughters now in 
milk and many cows in calf to him, I let him go to make 
room for my other seven premier sires. 

For further particulars address 

R. M. HOTALING, 

431 Jackson Street, San Francisco, Cal. 




January 25, 1902J 



©he gveebci: tint* gtpovt&mcm 



13 



Bonnie Direct 2:054 

World's Record for Pacers in First 
Season's Campaign. 

Winner of fastest 5-heat race paced in 1900. Win- 
ner of Chamber of Commerce Stake at Detroit; 
Blue Hill Stake at Readville, and three other 
great races. Biggest money winner of "New" 
Facers of 1300, having $7,575 to his credit the first 
year out. 

S:red by Direct 2:05!, Sire of Directly 2:03]. 
Directum Kelly 2:08 j. Etc. 

Dam BON BON 2:26 (dam of Bonsilene 2:14^), 
by Simmons 2:28, sire of Helen Simmons 2:11^, 
New York Central 2- IS, etc. Also sire of dams of 
Owyhee 2:11. and Fereno 2:10%, as a three-year- 
old, and winner of last season's (19(H)) Kentucky 
Futurity 

Second Dam BONNIE WILKES 2:2(1, by George 
Wilkes 2:22. 

Third Dam BETTY VILEY, by Bob Johnson, 
thoroughbred son of Boston. 

RH1MIVIF niRFfT is a D,acl< stallion, lay hands high, weighs 1100 lbs. Is a good individual 
DvJIiniE UllvUVl has best of feet and legs, and is absolutely sound in every way. 

BONNIE DIRECT will serve a limited number of approved mares during season of 1002, at SlOO 
the season, with return privilege if mare proves not with foal, and horse is alive and in my possession. 
Money due at time of service or upon removal of mare. Every care taken to prevent accidents or 
escapes, but no responsibility should any occur. Pasturage for maros at reasonable rates. 

Address 

C. L. GRIFFITH, 

PleasentOD, Tel 




Summary of Three of Bonnie 
Dlreot'a Racee. 

Chamber of Commerce Stakes. $5,000, at Detroit 

Bonnie Direct 9 5 8 1 I 1 

Annie-Thornton 14 1 12 2'' 

Hal McKwen 1 11 2 8 4dis 

Pussy Willow 8 3 II 3 3 ro 

George C. 3 4 3 4 5 ro. Cobbett 4 7 4 5 dr. Duchess 
11 13 5 6 dr. Joo Wheeler 12 9 7 7 dr. Fred Wilton 
2 2 9 dis, Mt Clemens Hoy 5 8 6 dr. Louis E Mid- 
dle ton 6 8 12 dr, Snort 7 10 10 dr. Gamecock 10 12 
dr, Connie 13 dr, Little Frank dis. 

Time— 2:10'/4, 2:12M, 2:13y, 2:13, 2:12M, 2:l2y. 

2:13 Class, pacing, purse $1,500, at Columbus. 

Bonnie Direct 2 5 111 

Johunv Agan 1 1 2 2 3 

Lady Piper 3 2 3 4 2 

Freilmont 5 3 i 3 4 

Red Light 4 4 5 dr, Prince F.xum dis. 

Time-0:31. 1 :02V. 1:34, 2:05><(; 0:88— , 1:05'4, 1:38«, 
2:10^; 0:32, 1:03'/,, l:34V4, 2:07^: 0:31(4, l:04'j, 1:37%, 
2:08y: 0:31 M. 1:08%, 1:3ft. 2:08K- 

Bluo Hill Stalio, $3,000, at Readville. 

Bonnie Direct 1 1 I 

Sallie Hook 2 2 8 

Evolute 5 3 2 

Annie Thornton 4 4 3 

Paul Revere 3 5 4, Dark Wilkes 6 7 5, Tommy 
W. 7 8 7, Argo Director 8 8 6, Lady Allright 9 9 9, 
Beauty Spot dis, P. H. Flynn dis 

rimo-2:07y. 2:09J4, 2:I0!<. 



TRAIN YOUR HORSES 

AT NAPA TRACK. 

VO SAFER OR BETTER TRACK IN CALI- 
i ' forula on which to work and train horses. 
Large, roomy box stalls in first-class condition for 
rent at $2 per mouth. A reduction made in rental 
accordiiiL' to number of stalls taken. The best 
climate on earth. Miles of clean, dry roads to jog 
on duriug rainy season Transportation by oar or 
boat to San Francisco Hay and grain of best 
quality at low prices. Correspond with 

AKTIIl'It II. BROWN, Napa, Cal. 



CALIFORNIA 

Photo Engraving Company 

IIICII CLASS ART 

IN 

Half T>i:i aii L'.h-, Engraving 
Artistic Designing. 

513 Market Street, San Francisco 



Fi 



FOR SALE 



HI inn REGISTERED NO 9438. Weight 
IIUULI. 1850: bred bv J. D Patterson. O.xnard, 
Cal: foaled April 18, 1898. Sire, Leopold 4250 by 
imp Louis 3299- dam, Henrietta II 5779 by imp. 
Montebelle 3298; second dam, imp. Lady Henri- 
etta I 2449 

MADnillC REGISTERED NO 9017. 
ITIAKVUIC. Weight 1800; bred by .1 D. Pat- 
terson, Oxnard. Cal.; foaled March 25. 1895, Sire, 
imp. Montebelle 3298 by Ciesar; dam imp. Maria 
I 2450 by Hercules. 

These Stallions are tirst-class and their sires 
and dams are among the noted prize-winners in 
Europe. For price and further particulars ad 
dress AMERICAN BEET SUGAR CO., 123 Cali- 
fornia Street. San Francisco. 



High Class Saddle Horse 
FOR SALE. 

BAY GELDING, 6 YEARS OLD, ABOUT Hi 
hands, weighs about 1050 lbs. Stylish, hand- 
some, perfectly gentle and perfectly gaited; can 
travel all day. Call or address. CAPT MELL- 
DORFER, San Francisco Riding School, Pacific 
cvenue, near Polk. 



The Highly Bred Stallion 

WILKES DIRECT 2:221 

Full Brother to John A. McKerron 2:06 3-4 to Wagon. 

By NUTWOOD WILKES 2:lft!4. sireof John A McKerron 2:06%, Who Is ItS:l0}<, 
Stanton Wilkes 2: IO'/ 2 , Claudius 2: 18%, Georgie B 2A2H. Bob Inger.soll 2:14y and other 
standard performers 

Dam Ingar (dam of John A McKerron 2:06%, Wilkes Direct 2:22V, and Thursday 
2:24) by the old champion Director 2:17. sire of Directum 2:05){. Direct 2:05(4, Direction 
2:10M, Evangeline 2:1 Ivi, Margaret S 2:1214 and others: second dam Annie Titus (dam 
of Annie C 2:25) by Echo 462, sire of Echora 2:23'/4 (dam or Direct 2:05",,) and |f> others 
in list; third dam Tiffany mare (dam of Gibraltar 2:2214, sire of Our Dick 2:10!^. 
Homestake 2:H\4 and others) by Owen Dale, sou of Williamson's Belmont. 
W/ll WF^ niRFCT ' s a dark bay, 15 3 hands and weighs 1200 pounds; well 
VYILMjO LMI\CV/I formed and of kind disposition Will make the season of 
1902 at the stables of T. W. Barstow on the Alameda Avenue 

Near Race Track, San Jose, Cal. 

FROM FEBRUARY 1st TO JUNE 1st. 



TERMS, 



$40 THE SEASON. 



Good pasturage $3 per month No wire fencing Every care taken to prevent 
accidents or escapes, but no responsibility should any occur Address 




T. W. 



Telephone No.: West 141. 



BARSTOW. 

San Jose. C.il. 



WILKES DIRECT 2:22 1=2. 

Full Brother to John A. McKerron «:0<i3-4. 



The Thoroughbred Stallions 



SEASON OF 1902. 



Ossary 



Ben d'Or 



Ormonde. 



( Doncaster 
I Rouge Rose 



Breed to the Champion of the World 
McKINNEY 2:11i 



( Counteno Langden 



! , .. « f Macaroni 

[Lily Agnes , rolly Agne8 

.... „. ( King Tom 

fK.ngcraft | Woodcraft 



| . ( Adventurer 

[Joysan ^ , ady LaI)g( 



gden 



OSSARY will make the season of 11102 at the Menlo Stock Farm, San Mateo County Cal. 
approved mares only. He is a superb animal and undoubtedly the best son of Ormonde in the st 
(barring of course, Orme. to whom he yields nothing in appearance and pedigree). 

Terms and particulars on application. 



St. Carlo 



St. Blaise. 



f Hermit. 



I Newmingter 
| Seclusion 

J Marsyas 
( Vesuvienne 



[Carina. 



rizi .-a (Lexington 
| Kingfisher , j Ktnan 6 La8g 

LCarlta j 



The Ill-Used 
Camilla 

ST CARLO won the Great American at Brooklyn, the Foam Stakes at Ooney Island, the White 
Plains Handicap, was second to Chaos for the Futurity and won about J2U.00C I as a two-year-old He 
is a wonderful young Sire, among his get being Ruinart (winner of the Burns Hand, cap, Palace Hotel 
Handicap and *ll,65ti), Zamar II (winner of 19 races as a two-year-old and 87995), Joan, February, 
Cuthbert St Calatini, Count of Flanders' Lord Marmion, May Boy, Our Climate, Glendinning and 
many others 



TERMS FOR THE SEASON, 



$100. 



For further particulars in regard to abDve Stallions apply to 

james McDonnell, 

PORTOLA, San Mateo Co., Cal. 



McKINNEY 

SIRE OF 

Coney 2:02 

Jennie Mac 2:09 

Hazel Kinney 2:00% 

Dr. Book 2:10 

Zolock 2:!0!4 

Zombro 2: 1 1 

Charlie Mc 8:11% 

You Bet 2:11^ 

McZeus 1:13 

Osito 2:134 

Juliet p 2:18M 

Mcliriar 2:14 

Sweet Mario (mat) 2:14 

Harvev Mao 2:1454 

El Milagro 2:14K 

Sola 2:14'4 

Geo W. MoKinney 2:I4 1 / S 

McNally 2:15 

Monica 2:15 

McKinney at 14 years old 
has 

4 in the 2:10 list 
19 In the 2:15 list 
28 In the 2:20 list 
unequalled by any sire 

at the same ago 

1 I 

Telephone: Green 898, 



BY ALCYONE; DAM ROSA 
SPRAGUE (grandam of Fereno 
(3) 2:10',) by GOV. SPRAGUE 



By the percentage of his performances in the 2:15 and 2:20 lists he 
the Champion Sire of the World at any age. 

A Race Horse Himself. He started in 28 races, won 
25, was second twice and third ouca. 

He is a Sire of Race Horses. Every ono of his 

get in the 2:20 list secured their records in races and 
are all race winners. 

He is the Champion in the Show Ring, Champion on the 
Race Track and Champion in the Stud. 

His get bring better prices than the get of any other Stallion on 
this Coast. Nine sold in 11101 for from $1000 to $7500 each, an 
average of $3160 each, and $10,000 was refused for a young 
McKinney stallion 

He is a Complete Outcross to all California Hares. 

In l'.iOO his get won first second and fourth money in the Pacific 
Breeders Futurity, first and second money In the Occident 
Stake and llrst, second and third money in the Stanford Stake. 
The McKinneys are stake winners. 

WUL MAKE THE SEASON OF 1902 AT 

SAN JOSE RACE TRACK 

Beginning Feb. 1st until further notice. 

Terms for the Season, $100. 



In ease of failure to 
get mare with foal she 
may be roturned froe in 1903 if I still own the horse. All bills 
must be paid before removal of mare. 
Good pasturage for mares at reasonable ratos. For further par- 
ticulars address 

C. A. DURFEE, 

8 Magnolia Ave , SAN JOSE, CAL. 



SIDNEY DILLON 23157 

Sire of DOLLY DILLON 2:07 (the fastest niaro of 1901), 
I! s. DILLON 2:25 and CAPTIVITY 2:28>/ s , 

Will make the Season of 1902 at 

SANTA ROSA STOCK FARM, SANTA ROSA, CAL. 

TERMS FOR THE SEASON, 835 

SIDNEY DILLON was sired by Sidney 2:l9)i; dam Venus (dam of Adonis 2: 1 1 '/,, Leah 2:24)4 
C^mMiVi^otvdmll^.U'i,. pJyoheVl6K anS Lottie Parks 2: IBM and she was also damn 
Juno, the dam of Mercury 2:21 and Ida 2:30) by Venture 2:27'*. sh-e o dam i of D 

dam s. t b. by Algerine, son of Whipple's Hambletonlan SIDNEY DILLON s a mo le o s mmetry 
and imparts his grand individuality, inherent speed and excellent disposition to all W 

Best of care given mares, but no rjsponsibility for accidents or escapes Usual return privileges 
if horso is still in my possession. , 

For pasturage and other information regarding shipment of mares aauress 

FRANK TURN Kit, Superintendent Santa Rosa Stock farm, 
Or PIERCE BROS , 728 Montgomery St., S. F. SANTA ROSA, CAL. 




The Fast and Game Race 
Horse 

REY DIRECT 2:10 

By Direct 2:05J, Sire of Directly 2:03}, and 

'25 others in standard time. 
Dain Vera (Dam of Roy Direct 2:10 and Do 
Veras 2:1 1|) by Kentucky Volunteer. 

Will Make the Season of 1902 at 

LOS ANGELES 

TERMS FOR THE SEASON, *0O, 

Payable at time of service, with return privilege. 
Roy Direct is as sure a foal getter as any horse In 
America. 



For tabulated pedlgroo and full particulars, address 



GEO. A. DAVIS. Pleasanton. Cal. 



PedigreesT abulated and Typewritten, Ready for Framing. 



Write for prices. BREEDER and 
Sportsman, 36 Geary St., S. F. 



14 



JANUARY 25, 1802 




THE BAYWOOD STUD 

THE BUNGALOW, SAN MATEO, CA L. 
(Property of John Pabbott, Esq.) 
Devoted Exclus.vely to tbe Breeding and Training of 

High Stepping 
Hackney-Bred 
Harness Horses 



VETERINARY. 



HERE'S AN OPPORTUNITY 



STANDARD BRED 
MARES AND FILLIES 

FROM $40 UP. 

Many of Them are Registered and Nearly All Can Be. 
Write for Prices and Particulars. 

The owner, Hon. JESSE D. CARR, Salinas, wants to sell them immediately. 
Is not in need of the money, but is getting too old (87) to keep on breeding Horses. 
Will sell one or more and will give any one a big bargain that will take them all 
This is the best opportunity ever offored in California to get big values for money- 



Almeda C— Brown filly, foaled January, 1893. 

Sire, Gabilan; dam, Emma Registered in 

Vol. 13, Rule 7, as standard. Bred to Boodle Jr. 
Delight— Bay flllv, foaled February 15, 1897. Sire, 

Eugineer; dam, Flossie. No marks. Bred to 

Boodle Jr. 

Berth*— Dark brown mare. Sire, Carr's Mam- 
brino; dam, Emma. Has not foaled' yet. 

Bella— Black Ally, foaled March 20, 1893. Sire, 
Alpbeus Wilkes; dam, Lady Nelson. Bred to 
Boodle Jr. 

Trlx-Black filly, foaled April 20, 1899. Sire, Ecce; 
dam, Belle. 

Necessity— Light bay filly, foaled February 88, 
1897. Sire, Magenta: dam, Unique. 

Dora— Bay filly, foaled April t, 1890. Sire. Reno; 
dam, Martha. Bred to Major 

Epha— Bay filly, foaled April 24. 1892. Sire, Eugi- 
neer; dam, Puss. Registered in Vol. XIII. 
Bred to Boodle Jr. 

Elsie— Light bay filly, foaled March 25, 1895. Sire. 
Boodle; dam, Mary C. Bred to Nutwood 
Wilkes. 

Eda— Chestnut sorrel filly, foaled April 19. 1895. 
Sire, Hambletonian Wilkes; dam, Gabilan 
Maid. Bred to Boodle Jr. 

Flossie— Brown mare. Sire, Carr's Mambrino; 
dam, Gray Eagle mare brought from Ken- 
tucky. Vol. XIII. Bred to Boodle Jr. 

Gabilan Girl— Brown filly foaled April 8, 1892. 
Sire, Gabilan; dam, Clara. Vol. XIIL Bred 
to Major 

Queen Bess-Brown filly, foaled April 3, 1900. 

Sire, Boodle Jr.; dam, Gabilan Girl. 
Little Ora— Brown filly, foaled March 17, 1897 

Sire, Eugineer; dam Lilly B. 
Jane— Bay mare. Sire, Carr's Mambrino; dam 

Ballot Box. Bred to Major 
Juanlta Bay filly, foaled March 26, 1896. Sire, 

Bay Rum; dam Lucky Girl. Bred to Boodle Jr. 
ltty S.— Sorrel Oily, foaled April 22, 1900. Sire, 

Nutwood Wilkes: dam, Flossie. 
Flora— Bay Ally, foaled February 24, 1892. Sire, 

Reno; dam, Lady Palmer. Bred to Major. 
Fanchon— Bay filly, foaled April 13, 1898 Sire, 

Ecce: dam, Jane. 
Lady Palmer— Bay mare. Sire, Carr's Mam- 
brino; first dam by Luciona, he by Whipple 

Hambletonian. Vol. XIII , Rule, 7. Bred to 

Major. 

Llldlne— Bay filly, foaled March 28, 1894. Sire, 

Boodle; dam Gabilan Maid. Vol. XIII., Rule, 

VI. Bred to Nutwood Wilkes. 
AUegra— Bay filly, foaled April 27, 1899. Sire, 

Ecce; dam Jane. 
Martha— Bay mare. Sire, Mambrino Jr.; dam, 

Gabilan Maid. Bred to Major. 



Lilly B— Black mare (16 hands). Sire, Homer 

dam, Maggie Lee Registered as standard in 

Vol VI. Bred to Major 
Lucky Girl-Bay filly, foaled May 24, 1889 Sire, 

Carr's Mambrino; dam, Flossie. Bred to 

Boodle Jr. 

Miss Judy— Bay filly, foaled April 4, 1900 Sire, 

Boodle' Jr.; dam, Jane. 
Nancy — Bay mare. Sire. Mambrino Jr.; dam, 

Gabilan Maid. Bred to Boodle Jr. 
Peerless— Bay filly, foaled April ft, 1891. Sire, 

Gabilan; dam. Jane. Bred to Major. 
Comfort— Brown filly, foaled May 25, 1898. Sire, 

Magenta; dam Janet. 
Surprise-Brown mare. Sire, Abbotsford, son of 

Woodford Mambrino; first dam. Minnie by 

Ladd's Kentucky Hunter. Bred to Boodle Jr. 
Sausal Maid— Dark brown filly, foaled January 8. 

1892. Sire, Gabilan; dam. Flossie. Vol. Xill, 

Rule VI. Bred to Boodle Jr. 
Taddle J - Sorrel filly, foaled April 2. 1896 Sire, 

Bay Rum; dam, Mary C. Bred to Boodle Jr. 
Mary C— Bay mare, foaled April 8, 1898. Sire, 

Antevolo 7648; dam, Gabilan Maid. Bred to 

Boodle Jr. 

Ruby M — Bay filly, foaled March 28, 1898. Sire, 

Ecce; dam, Flora. 
Jenny Wren— Bay filly, foaled April 21, 1900. 

Sire, Boodle Jr,; dam. Flora. 
Claire— Bay filly, foaled May 10. 1899. Sire, Punch: 

dam. Lady St. Clair 
Beatrice Golden— Chestnut sorrel filly, foaled 

April 20, 1900. Sire, Boodle Jr.: dam, Lady 

Comstock Jr. 
Ontiirlo-Bay filly, foaled April 21, 1898. Sire, 

Magenta; dam, Lucky Girl. 
Miss Nobody— Gray filly, foaled March 26, 1897. 

Sire, Magenta: dam, Martha. 
Julia Dean— Bay filly, foaled April 13, 1898. Sire, 

Ecce; dam, Martha. 
Pobreclta— Black filly, foaled April 9, 1900. Sire, 

Boodle Jr.; dam, Martha. 
Helen Gould— Bay filly, foaled March 29, 1900. 

Sire, Boodle Jr.; dam. Miss Beauty. 
Miss Nan— Dark gray filly, foaled March 6, 1897. 

Sire, Magenta; dam, Nancy. 
Delta -Dark bay filly, foaled March 21, 1900. Sire, 

Boodle Jr.; dam, Nancy. 
Queen Mab— Sorrel filly, foaled April II, 1900. 

Sire, Nutwood Wilkes; dam, Nina B. 
Little Dorrlt— Gray filly, foaled March 14, 1897. 

Sire, Magenta; dam, Rita V. 
Adelaide— Dark gray Ally, foaled February 20, 

1897. Sire, Magenta, dam, Surprise. 
Evening Star— Black filly, foaled March 28, 1898. 

Sire, Magenta; dam, Sausal Maid. 



Ira Barker Dalziel 

VETERINARY DENTIST 

Fancy Carriage. Saddle and Road Horses for Sale 

Office and stable: 60S Golden Gate Avenue, San 
Francisco, Cal. Telephone South 651. 

Dr. "W/ ixi, F". B'gau. 

M. R. C. V. S., F. E. V. M. S. 

VETERINARY SURGEON. 

Member of the Royal College of Veterinary 
Surgeons, England; Fellow of the Edinburg 
Veterinary Medical Society: Graduate of the New 
Veterinary College, Edinburgh; Veterinary Sur- 
geon to the S. F. Fire Department; Live Stock 
Inspector forNew Zealand and Australian Colonies 
at the port of San Francisco; Professor of Equine 
Medicine, Veterinary Surgery, Veterinary Depart- 
ment University of California: Ex-President of 
the California State Veterinary Medical Associa- 
tion; Veterinary Infirmary, Residence and Office, 
San Francisco Veterinary Hospital. 1117 Golden 
Gate Avenue, near Webster St., San Francisco: 
Telephone West 128. 

BREEDERS' DIRECTORY. 



HOLSTEINS— Winners of every 7 days' butter 
contest at State Fair 1899 1st & 2d for aged cows, 
4-yr., 3-yr. and 2-yr.-olds; 21 Jerseys and Durhams 
competing. 5th year my Holstcins have beaten 
Jerseys for butter. Stock for sale; also pigs. F. 
H. Burke, 636 Market St., S. F. 



TKKBA BUENA JKKSEYS— The best A.J 
C. C. registered prize herd is owned by Henrj 
Pierce, San Francisco. Animals for sale. 



JERSEYS, HOLSTKIN8 AND DURHAMS. 

Dairy Stock specially. Hogs, Poultry. Estab- 
lished 1876. William Niles & Co. Los Angeles, 
Cal. 



A YRSHIRES— Young Hulls. Cows and Heifers. 
Registered. From prize winning families. 
SHORTHORNS-Of the famous Golden Drop 
family. All stock registered and sold on both 
blood lines and individuality. Brown & Brandon, 
Petaluma, Cal. 



Address JESSE D. GARB, Salinas, Cal. 



ASTHMA CUR E FREE! 

Asthmalene Brings Instant Relief and Permanent 

Cure in All Cases. 

Sent Absolutely Free on Receipt of Postal. 

There is nothing like Asthmalene. It brings 
instant relief, even in the worst cases. It cures 
when all else fails. 

The Rev. C. F. Wells, of Villa Ridge, 111., says: "Your 
trial bottle of Asthmalene received in good condition. I can- 
not tell you how thankful I feel for the good derived from it. 
I was a slave, chained with putrid sore throat and asthma for 
ten years. I despaired of ever being cured. I saw your ad- 
vertisement for the cure of this dreadful and tormenting dis- 
ease, asthma, and thought you had overspoken yourselves, 
but resolved to give it a trial. To my astonishment the trial 
acted like a charm. Send me a full-size bottle " 

We want to send to every sufferer a trial treatment of 
Asthmalene, similar to the one that cured Mr. Wells. We'll 
send it by mail POSTPAID, ABSOLUTELY FREE OF 
CHARGE, to any sufferer who will write for it, even on a postal. Never mind, 
though you are despairing, however bad your case, Asthmalene will relieve and 
cure. The worse your case, the more glad we are to send it. Do not delay 
Write at once, addressing DR. TAFT BROS.' MEDICINE CO., 79 East 130th St., 
N. Y. City. Sold by all : Druggiat8. 



SUNSET 
LIMITED 

One of the most magDificent 
trains ever built. For 1901-1902 
tri-weekly via Coast Line and 
Sunset Route for 

NEW ORLEANS and 
NEW YORK 

Leave SAN FRANCISCO 4:50 p m. 

Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays 

Leave LOS ANOELES 8:30 a, m 

Tuesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays 

Arrive NEW ORLEANS 7:20 p m. 
Thursdays, Saturdays. Mondays 



Among tho world's noted High- 
ways of Travel not one equals 
the route of this train. 
Get tho little book, "Wayside 
Notes," from any agent of the 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC 

Initial trip of Sunset Limited 
Friday, Dec. 6, from San Francisco 




To cure a Bruise or Strain quickly, 

proceed as follows: Wring out a 
sponge in boiling hot water and hold 
on the affected part, keeping the 
sponge hot by repenting the op- 
eration, for from 15 to 30 minutes. 
Rub dry and apply 

ABSORBINE 

rubbing it in well. Use the 
hot water steaming process 
once a day and apply the Ab- 
, sorbine from three to|four 
{•%Zg5f pJ- 1 times a day. One or two days 
I ->.?/v^i/> % •«• usually cures fresh cases. 
Absorbine is unequalled in removing bunches 
caused by a bruise or strain from animal or man- 
kind. Vet. size S3 per bottle, for mankind SI per 
bottle, delivered or furnished by regular dealers. 
Write for pamphlets. Manufactured by 
W.F.YOUNG.P.D.F Springfield. Mass. 

For sale by Mack & Co., Langley & Michaels Co , 
Redington & Co., J. O'Kane, and J. A. McKerrou, 
all of San Francisco. 




HEALDS 



BUSINESS COLLEGE 
24 Post Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

The oldest, the largest, the most popular com- 
mercial school on the Pacific Coast. 18,000 gradu- 
ates; 25 teachers: 00 typewriters; over 300 students 
annually placed in positions. Send for catalogue. 

K. P. HEALD, Preslden 



KENNEL ADVERTISEMENTS 



FOX TERRIERS AT STUD. 

VIRO Vteto 

i iuu Eggesford Dora 

Stud fee SI0. 

WANDEE JESTER{SSffi«!rtS; 

Stud fee, $5. 

WANDEE BE BE{S£&£K 

Stud fee, $5. 

PUPPIES AND BROOD BITCHES FOR SALE 

For particulars address 

Wandee Kennels 

844 HARRISON ST., S. F. 



(Tbe World's Champion Bull Terrier) 

AT STUD 

L. A. KLEIN 

JJ570 <ieary St., San Francis.-,, 



Apply to 



AT STUD 

CUBA OF KENWOOD 

(Ulauheuin Jr. — ->i*-1.h i 
SAM'S BOW 
(Pialn -*m— D ill] ln-e II) 

STOCKOALE KENNELS 

K. M. DODOS, M„.,ai<.-r, 
K»li«r«fi..|(l, Kern f.,.. 

Boarding Pointer Puppies and w.-llbrokeu 

Dogs for sale. 



Do^ Diseases 



-AND 



3EE#r> xrv to 37" ood 

Mailed Free to any address by the 
author, H. Clay Glover, D. V. S 
1278 Broadway, New York. 



ff^aM&jNTE^r-' • D0G5 WITH nAHQl 



H. F. LORQUIN 

TAXIDERMIST 

Dealer in Naturalists' Supplies 

(SCIENTIFIC MOUNTING OF BIRDS. RUGS 
w Heads, Animals, Fishes, Reptiles, Insects 

310 Kearny St. (upstairs) San Francisco. 

Phone. Black 5332 



15 Cents 



Send 15 cents in 2 cent postage stamps A 

and secure a copy of our largo V 

A Blue Ribbon Holiday Edition 

to be published Jan. 15, 1902. Thirty- ft 

S six pages beautifully illustrated arid v 

U replete with information. H 

U Sl.OO will secure the large Blue Ribbon Q 

p. Holiday Edition and the weekly Spirit ft 

x of the West one year. Address ^ 

J Spirit of the West, Des /lolnes, Iowa 9 



Mark Levy & Co. 



MARK LEVY 
Expert Cutter 
ind Filler... 
fine Suits 
from 

K5.00 up 




Only the 
Beit Help 
Employed... 
AH work \^ 
done on the 
premtteV*.'/' ■ 



JkJGeery U., J. F. Rooms tff-20 Phone t'lnt IS# 



Coast Agents 

McMURRAY'S 
Sulkies, Carts and Speed Wagons 

WHEELS TO ORDER 

FOR SULKIES AND CARTS 
at 818, SSI and S25 per pair. 

Phone KENNEY BICYCLE CO., 

White 81 S31 Valencia St., San FranrUco 



ANUARY 25, 19021 



15 



INTERESTING and VALUABLE 

HORSE BOOKS 

MAKE YOUR SELECTION. 

Any of the following Books will be sent Postpaid for the price named : 



THE PRACTICAL HORSE KEEPER 

By George Fleming, If,. D. , F. R. C. V. S. 



A guide to those who have to do 
with horses, containing chapters 
on Breeding. Purchasing, Stable 
and Stabling, Feeding and Gen- 
eral Management, Riding, Hunt- 
ing, Breaking and Training, Har- 
ness and Driving, Shoeing and 
Diseases of the Foot, Injuries, 
Lameness, Diseases of the Hor se, 
the Ass and Mule, etc. Bound 
in cloth. Size, 5£ x 7$ inches. 
90c. 




THE 

AMERICAN 
PACING 
AND 
TROTTING 

HORSE 

T.COATES 



A SHORT HISTORY OF THE AMERICAN 
TROTTING AND PACING HORSE 

By Henry T. Coates. 

The book, besides treating of 
Driving Horses, gives a con- 
densed history of the best horses 
in this country, with mention of 
their best performances. It is 
invaluable in its suggestions to 
horse trainers, and is the latest 
book on this subject published. 
Illustrated with 4 fine pictures. 
Size, 5} x "i inches. Bound in 
cloth 90c. 



YOUATT ON THE HORSE 




The Horse. IJy Wm Youatt. 

Together with a General 
History of the Horse and a 
Dissertation on the American 
Trotting Horse and an essay 
on the Ass and the Mule, by 
J. S. Skinner. With an en- 
graving on steel and 58 illus- 
trations on wood. Bound in 
full cloth. Size, 5| x 8£ 
inches $1.15 



THE HORSE IN THE STABLE AND IN 
THE FIELD 



His management in health 
and disease By J. H. Walsh, 
F. R. C S. (Stonohenge). 
Illustrated with over 80 en- 
gravings from photographs. 
Handsomely bound in cloth. 
Size, b\ x 7i inches $1 .15 




DISEASES OF THE HORSE AND HOW TO 
TREAT THEM 

My Robert Chan-ner. 

New Edition and Concise Man- 
ual of Special Pathology for 
use of Horsemen, Farmers, 
Stock Raisers and Students of 
the Agricultural Colleges. 
Fully illustrated. Bound in 
cloth. Size, 5} x ~\ inches 
Cloth $1 25 




■•It is an unpretending treatise 
free from technicalities, and well 
adapted for the use of farmers and 
stock raisers. The object of Dr. 
Chawner was to make a popular and 
reliable nauubook in that department of veterinary science which 
treats of the horse and his diseases and in this object he has 
succeeded and supplied a practical want. There is no extraneous 
matter. Information is imparted with commendable brevity and 
in language plain and simple enough to be understood by all. The 
fallacies of the old school are rejected, and the treatment pre- 
scribed is that of modern practitioners."— Turf, Field and Farm. 



THE AMERICAN 



STABLE 




GENTLEMAN'S 
GUIDE 

The American Gentleman's 
Stablo Guide, containing a de- 
scription of the American Sta- 
ble and Method of Feeding, 
Grooming and the general 
management of horses, to- 
gether with the directions for 
the care of carriages, harness, 
etc. Fully iliustrated. Pocket 
Edition. Size, 5x7 inches. 
Bound in cloth $1 .15 



"The book contains a familiar description of the American 
stable, the most approved method of feeding, grooming and general 
management of horses, together with directions for the care of 
carriages, harness, etc. The whole is founded on the careful study 
and experience of many years of the author's life, and forms a val- 
uable manual for any one who has charge of the noblest of man's 
irrational servants. Its low price and great value should give it 
general circulation among horsemen "—Indiana Farmer. 



HOSRE BREEDING RECOLLECTIONS 



By Count H.ehenoU>rff 



IN(j 



(ECOLLECTIOJiS- 



The Manager of the Govern- 
ment Stud of Germany, who 
has made a special study of 
the intricacies of horse breed- 
ing, and in the volume before 
us embodies the result of years 
of careful study. While all 
may not agree with his con- 
clusions, nono will dispute the 
value of his observations. 
Size, 5} x 81 inches Bound 
in full cloth $1.15 



" The recital of his experiences and the suggestions which ho 
furnishes will undoubtedly prove of value to all who are interested 
in equine matters. Everyone so interested ought to own a copy of 
this valuable vade mecum." 



THE TROTTING HORSE OF AMERICA 

How to Train and Drive Him, with Reminiscences 
of the Trotting Tuif. 

By Hiram Woodruff, 

Edited by Charles J. Foster. 
Including an Introductory 
Notice by Goorge Wilkes and 
a Biographical Sketch by the 
Editor. With a steol portrait 
of the author and six engrav- 
ings on wood of celebrated 
trotters. 12mo. Size, 51 x 1\ 
inches. Cloth, extra.. $1.25 




' The author was one of the most 
noted horsemen of this country, and 
in the work before us has given 
to the public the best thoughts, 
founded on years of experience in the feeding, handling, breaking 
and training of colts with a view to securing their best perform- 
ances. Besides treating of driving horses, it gives a condensed 
history of the best horses in this country, with a mention of their 
best performances. It is invaluable in its suggestions to horso 
trainers, and its rules laid down and suggestions given are as good 
as the day they were written." 



BOOK OF THE FARM 

Or the Handy Book of Husbandry 

Containing Practical Infor- 
mation in regard to Buying 
or Leasing a Farm; Fences 
and Farm Buildings, Farm- 
ing Implements, Drainage, 
Plowing, Subsoiling, Manur- 
ing, Rotation of Crops, Care 
and Medical Treatment of 
the Cattle, Horses, Sheep, 
Swine and Poultry; Manage- 
ment of the Dairy; Useful 
Tables, etc. By George E. 
Waring Jr. of Ogden Farm, 
author of " Draining For 
Profit and For Health," etc. 
New edition, thoroughly revised by the author. With 
100 illustrations. 12mo. Size, 5J x 1\ inches. 542 
pages. Cloth, extra $1.25 




■' The farmer who wants to succeed in these days of busy compe- 
tition must do his farming in the most intelligent manner, and 
realize that the cultivation of the earth is a science as well as an 
industry. No farmer ought to be without this book, for it contains 
much that every farmer and his family need to know. It tells 
about buying a farm and gives ample directions about buildings, 
improvements and everything pertaining to the crops, the farm 
animals and the management of the business."— Sunday Magazine. 



JERSEY, ALDERNEY AND GUERNSEY COWS 

Willis IV Hazard. 

Their History, Nature and 
Management. Showing how 
to choose a good cow; how to 
feed, to manage, to milk and 
to breed to the most profit. 
Edited from the writings of 
Edward P. Fowler, George E. 
Waring Jr., Charles L. Sharp- 
less, Prof. John Gamgee, Fr. 
Guenon and others. Illustrated 
with engravings and diagrams, 
etc. Bound in full cloth. Size, 
5J x 8J inches $1.15 




BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, 36 GEARY ST., S. F. 



Pedigrees Tabulated, 

Stallion Cards and Folders, 

Stallion Service Books 
BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 36 GEARY ST., S. F. 



©he gvecbev mtfr *&pnvt&maxt 



[January 25, 190^ 





HORSE BOO TS 



San Francisco, Cal. 



Walter Winans 



Vice President of the National 
Rifle Association of Great Britain 



makes the following statement in his recent book, 
"Art of Revolver Shooting." 




.44 



prefer this 
yards, as I 

" unaccount- 



The U. M. C. Co., IT. S. A., have supplied me with large quantities of 
gallery ammunition loaded with both round and semi-round bullets. 

These have a small charge of black powder, and I should 
ammunition for self-defense as well as for competition up to 20 
find it the most accurate for exhibition shooting. 

I think the U. M. C. gives slightly less recoil and fewer 
ables" than the English equivalent. 

They also load these cartridges with smokeless powder, which I have used and 
with which I have made my bests on record in the rapid fire competition. 

Send for now U. M. C. Illustrated catalogues for further information concerning these modern 
Short Range or Gallery Cartridges, which are coming into wide use among 
experts and others. Game Laws and Shooting Rocords Free. 

The UNION METALLIC CARTRIDGE CO. 



\ v38-44 S&W 
TARGET 



AGENCY: 
313 Broadway, N.Y. 



Bridgeport, Conn. 



IIEI'OT: 
435 Market St., S.F.,Cal 





NUMBER 5 RIFLE 

A High-Power Arm adapted to Smokeless Powder Cartridges. 

OUR REMINGTON-LEE SPORTING RIFLE 

Without an Equal for Long Range Target and Big Qame Shooting. 

Frank H. Hyde shot with a Remington-Lee Ritle and won 
The All-Comers Match, Seagirt, New Jersey, Sept. 10, 1901. 

Send for Catalogue describing same and Target Pistols, Shotguns, etc. 

REMINGTON ARMS GO. 



ILION, N . Y. 



PACIFIC COAST DEPOT: 

425-427 MARKET ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



The "Old Reliable" Parker 



once more proves its 
right to the title, 
the Grand Ameri- 
can Handicap of 
1900. 



1st— H. D. Bates, with 59 straight kills. 
2d— J. R. Malone, with 58 straight kills. 
3d— Phil Daly Jr., with 31 straight kills. 
All used the "Old Reliable." 



SMITH GUNS 

At the Cal. Inanimate Target Association 
May 25-26, 1901. 

71 Shooters, 20 used Smith Guns. 

There were 11 Individual Trophies offered. 
Shooters using SMITH GUNS captured 9! 
Coast Record made by Edward Schultz, 112 Straight. 

Edgar Forster, high average, 95%. Ed. Schultz and Otto Feudner, 92%. 
Webb, 911%. E. Feudner, 89J%. Varien, 88%. F. Feudner, 87*% 
Flickinger; 87%. Shields and McCutchan, 86$%, Williamson, 86%. 

They all shot L. C. Smith Guns. 

Catalogue on application to 

HUNTER ARMS CO., Fulton, N. Y. 

HIL. B. BEKEART CO., San Francisco, Coait Representative. 

Du Pont Gun Powder 

SMOKELESS 

SHOT GUN ana 

MILITARY POWDER 

Black Powder for Sporting and Blasting Purposes 
The Reputation of a Hundred Years is the Guarantee of 

DU PONT POWDER 

C.A HAIOHT. AKent, - - - 236 Market Street, San FrancLco ' 




Also, as the official records show. 54 per cent of the 
entire purse won with Parkers; 37.5 per cent of all the 
guns winning money were Parkers: and 34.6 per cent of all guns entered 
were Parkers, which proves that the Parker is unquestionably the most 



popular and " reliable" eun in the world. 

PARKER BROTHERS 



N. Y. Salesroom: 32 Warren St. 

MERIDEN CONN 



DU PONT 

* E. C." 
SCHULTZE 
HAZARD 



You can get 'hese Smokeless Powders in 

FACTORY CUTI I O 
LOADED . . On LLLO 

SHOTGUN RIFLEITE 
BALLISTITE 
LAFLIN & RAND 



What More do you Want? 



COAST RECORD. 

Made with SHOTGUN RIFLEITE 

EDWARD SCHULTZ 

112 Straight Targets. 

Ingleside, May 28, 1901. 



WORLD RECORD. 

Made with E. C. No. 1 
w. R. CROSBY 

345 Straight Targets. 

New York, April, 1901. 



Manufactured by THE AMERICAN "E. C." and "SCHULTZE" Gunpowder Co., Ltd. 

PHIL. B BEKEART CO.. PaclBo Coast RepresenUtlra 



Clabrough, Golcher & Co. 



GUNS 
Gun Goods 



**-8end for Catalogue. 




FISHING 
Tackle 



538 MARKET STREET, S. F 



2 



(The gveebev ctxxb gtportemcm 



[February 1, 1902 



Palo Alto Broodmares at Auction. 

Palo Alto's 9ale of broodmares which came off as 
per announcement at the Occidental Horse Exchange, 
on Thursday of this week, showed very conclusively 
that the revival of interest in the breeding of trotting 
horse is something more than newspaper talk. At 
least five hundred persons crowded the salesring and 
buyers were present from all parts of tho United States 
and a few from foreign countries. The stock sold 
were all in that splendid condition so typical of every- 
thing that comes from the groat Palo Alto farm, and 
the prices received were good. The highest price 
received was paid by Mr. Henry Pierce, of the Santa 
Rosa Stock Farm, for the Gen. Benton groat brood- 
mare Elsie, that had a five hours old colt by McKinney 
2:11 J at her side. Mr. Pierce's bid was 8775 and was 
made after C. A. Durfee had offered $750. Mr. Pierco 
stated that ho purchased the mare for Dr. Hamilton, 
of Boston, Mass., who had telegraphed a limit of $1000 
as a bid for the mare. Elsie is twenty years old and 
one of the youngest looking animals for those years in 
the country. She is the dam of Palita (2) 2:10, Rio 
Alto (3) 2:16* and three more in the list. This mare 
was a great bargain. 

Bell Bird, yearling record 2:20], two year old record 
2:22, by Electioneer out of Beautiful Bells, and a mag- 
nificent individual 15.3 hands high and a beautiful 
brown, went to the nod of H. S. Hogoboom of Sacra- 
mento, who, it was rumored purchased for Mr. Fred 
Raschen, a wealthy business man of the capital city. 
Bell Bird is twelve years old and has been in the stud 
since 1895, producing a colt that year by Dexter Prince, 
fn 1898 she foaled a colt by Wildnut and in 1900 a filly 
by Dexter Prince. She is now in foal to Iran Alto 
2:l2j. Although she has not produced a standard per- 
former as yet, she is comparatively young for a brood 
mare and being a member of one of the greatest fami- 
lies in the world colts and, fillies from her will be valu- 
able. Mr. Hogoboom immediately booked her to Nut- 
wood Wilkes 2:16J and sent her to Nutwood Stock 
Farm where she will be kept until dropping her .Iran 
Alto foal and then bred to Mr. Carter's great horse. 
This should prove a speed nick and Mr. Hogoboom 
has already had an offer for the result of this mating- 

The twenty year old stallion Azmoor 2:20A went for 
a low price, Rancho del Paso securing him for $210. 
He will be bred to some of this farm's best mares this 
year and will be a very profitable investment. While 
Azmoor cannot be said to be fashionably bred, being 
•jut of a thoroughbred mare, ho would have been a 
profitable investment for some one at three times the 
money be brought. 

The prices realized and the parties purchasing were 
as follows: 

Bell Bird 2:22, br m, 1890, by Electioneer-Boautiful 
Bells by The Moor; H. S. Hogoboom, $750. 

Clarion 2:25j|, b m, 1887, by Ansel 2:20-Consolation 
by Dictator; John Rowen, $250. 

Elsie, ch m, 1882, by Genjral Benton-Elaine by Mes- 
3enger Duroc; Santa Rosa Stock Farm, $775. 

Ella 2:29, b m, 1884, by Electioneer- Lady Ellen by 
Carr's Mambrino; C. X. Larrabie, 1800. 

Lady well 2:101, blk m, 1886, by Electioneer-Lady 
Lowell by St. Clair; Santa Rosa Stock Farm, $325. 

Asombrosa, b m, 18<)ti, by Azmoor-Ahwaga by Gen. 
Benton; J. Wright, $300. 

Nellie Benton 2:30, b m, 1880, by Gen. Benton-Norma 
by Norman 25; J. Faris. $200. 

Zorilla, blk m, 1897, by Dexter Prince-Lily Thorne 
by Electioneer, F. Gommet, $475. 

Wild may 2:30, b m, 1887, by Electioneer-May by 
Wildidle; D. Hamra, Seattle, $340. 

Cecino, b m, 1898, by Mendocino-Cecil by Gen. Ben- 
ton; Jamos Duncan, $185. 

Coralie, b m, 1897, by Boodle 2:12i-Coral by Elec- 
tioneer; D. Hamm, $400 

Clarionette, br m, 1896, by Dexter Prince-Clarion by 
Ansel; L. Lassell, $200. 

Anselma 2:29i, ch m, 1885, by Ansel-Elaine by Mes- 
senger Duroc; C. X. Larrabie, $200. 

Sylla Barnes, ch m, 1894, by Whips-Barnes by Elec- 
tioneer; J. Wright, $260. 

Lily Thorne, blk m, 1888, by Electioneer-Lad v 
Thorne Jr.; C. F. vVhite, $275. 

Lady Agnes, b m, 1884, by Electioneer-Lady Lowell 
by St. Clair; Santa Rosa Stock Farm, $450. 

Lady Nutwood 2:341, b m, 1880, by Nutwood-Lady 
Mac by American Boy Jr.; C. X. Larrabie, $200. 

Ororose, b m, 1898, by Oro Wilkes 2:ll-Melrose by 
Sultan; C. Christainscn, $210. 

Sabling, blk m, 1892, by Guy Wilkes 2:15}-Sable by 
The Moor; C. E. Fredericks, $350. 

Giacinta, blk m, 1895, by Guy Wilkes-Sproule by 
Le Grande; E. R. Realties, $175. 

Corsica, b m, 1892, by Dexter Priuce-Corsican (thor): 
S. J. Crooks, $125. 

Morning Glory, b m, 1881, by Electioneer-Marti by 
Whipple's Hambletonian; R E. Steele, $150 

Laura Drew, ch ra, 1883, by Arthurton Molly Drew 



by Winthrop; S. J. Crooks, $100. 

Azmoor 2:20}, b s, 1882, by Electioneer-Maraie C. by 
imp. Hercules; Rancho del Paso, $210. 

Menzie, ch g, 1889, by Mendocino-Lizzie by Wildidle! 
L. Bowman, $160. 

Altower, br g, 1898, by Altivo-Wiid (lower by Elec- 
tioneer; E. W. Flannery, $105. 

Total for tho sale $7590, an average of a little over 
$292 per head for tho 26 horses sold. 

At the conclusion of the Palo Alto sale, a few horses 
and colts belonging to other parties were sold as 
follows:' 

Essie, b m, 1884, by Nephew-Eva Clay by Clay; $300. 

Bay colt, 1900, by McKinney 2:1 1 4, dam She 2:12A 
by Abbotsford; F. W. Covey, $500. 

Lottie Kisber. br m. 1893, by Kisber-Flossie by 
Prompter; J. C. Bocarde, $105. 

Bessie, b m, 1896, by Richards Elector; Club Stables, 
$127.50. 



Meetings Announced. 

It begins to look as if the California circuit ol 11902 
will be the best seen in this State for years. The 
Breedek and Sportsman received word from the 
Napa Agricultural Society this week that the dates 
August 11th to 16th were claimed by that association 
and that within a short time twelve purses for harness 
horses, ranging from $600 to $800 would be offered. 

Secretary C. F. Thomas, of tho Woodland Associa- 
tion, also writes claiming the week prior to the State 
Fair as the Woodland dates. Mr. Thomas says the 
association will soon advertise two stakes of $1000 each 
for the slow class trotters and pacers, to be followed 
by one of the most att ractive harness programs ever 
offered by this popular association. 

Bakersfield, the centre of the oil belt, will get into 
the circuit this year, and the Secretary of Agricultural 
District No. 15, located there, has officially claimed the 
week prior to the Los Angeles meeting. Bakersfield 
citizens will do everything in their power to make this 
one of the best meetings ever held in California. The 
driving club proposes to donate $2500 to the cluh, the 
business houses of the town will add $3000 more and 
tho State appropriation of $2500 is available. This will 
give a guaranteed fund of $8000, which will insure a 
good fair and race meeting. 

The State Fair will hold a two weeks meeting a 
usual and if the Board's plan of no books on harness 
events is carried out, trotters and pacers will have a 
better chanco than for many years past. 

The P. C. T. H. B. A. will give one or more meet- 
ings and the outlook is most favorable all along the 
line. 

Horse Show at Haywards. 

The people of Haywards, Alameda county, propose 
giving a horse show on the 8th of March this year for 
the purpose of showing to the breeders of that section 
and all who may lend their presence to the occasion, 
the sort of stallions that will be in service this year in 
Alameda county. The show, however, is not to be 
confined to stalliors, but all sorts of horses will be wel- 
come to take a placo in tho parade. No prizes are to 
be given, but the show is to be on the lines of the 
historical Court Day in Kentucky, when hnr<e owners 
from miles around bring their animals to a county 
seat or other town and show or offer them for sale. 

The Haywards people will make the date of this 
horse show a general holiday and will have a fine band 
of music and other entertainment to amuse and edify 
all who attend. 

Mr. Geo. Oakes, editor of the Hay wards Journal, has 
been chosen Secretary of the Horse Show Committee 
and all who desire information in regard to it should 
address him. Further particulars will be g'.ven in 
these columns later on. 



Oakland Baron Sold for $17,500. 

New York, Jan. 30.- Jacob Ruppert, Jr., nought 
Oakland Baron, 10 years old, trotter, by Baron Wilkes, 
dam Lady Mackay, for $15,700 at the Fasig-Tipton 
sate to-day. Oakland Baron is a brown stallion with 
a record of 2:09}. He will be raced, but will also be 
used for stud purposes at Poughkeepsie. Oakland 
Baron was consigned by the Philadelphia Brewing 
Company. 

Lady Mackay, the dam of Oakland Baron, was bred 
in California. She is by Silverthread, he a son of The 
Moor out of Gray Dale (dam of Longworth 2:19) by 
American Boy Jr., a son of Williamson's Belmont. 
Lady Mackay's dam was Fleetwing, tho dam of Stam- 
boul 2:071. Lady Mackay is in the great broodmare 
list, being the dam of Lucy H. 2:18], Oakland Baron 
2:09} and Semi Tropic 2:24 

California favorite hot weather drink — Jackson's 
Napa Soil a 

Boyce Tablet a will relieve soreness quicker than anything yoti 
can use. 



Barondale Has Arrived. 

Tom James, formerly of Des Moines, Iowa, but now 
a resident of San Jose, was pleased one day last week 
when a car rolled into the Garden City depot contain- 
ing his stallion Barondale 2:11], two broodmares and a 
colt. The latter is by Barondale and a very handsome 
piece of young horseflesh. Barondale stood the trip 
well and came out of the car as though he had not 
been in it longer than overnight. He is a very hand- 
some horse, and Mr. James, who was in this city last 
Thursday, informs us that Barondale is on view at till 
times and that he will be pleased to show him to 
breeders or any others that admire a good horse. 

Barondalois one of the best bred horsesever brought 
to California and as Mr. James has put his stud fee 
down to the very low figure of $40, there is no doubt 
at all that the stallion's book will bo filled very early. 
Barondale has a race record of 2:11], obtained as a 
four year old and made in the third and fourth heats 
of a race. He was a good race horse and a good win- 
ner, and although not put into the stud until six years 
of age, has already produced race winners. Ho is by 
Baron Wilkes 2:18, one of the truly great sires and 
race horses. His dam is that great producing mare, 
Nathalie (that is also the dam of Grand Baron 2:12], 
own sister to Clarinda, dam of two, and half sister to 
Prodigal, Patron and Patronage) by Nutwood; second 
dam Beatrice, that prolific dam of speed and speed 
sires, bv Cuyler: third dam Mary Mambrino (founder 
of a great family) by Mambrino Patchen: fourth dam 
by Embry's Wagner, thoroughbred, and thence on 
through the best four-mile blood in the American 
Stud Book. 

A Protest Sustained. 

Every secretary of a trotting association is embar- 
assed and annoyed by the lax and slip-shod methods 
of a certain class of horsemen in making entries. 
These people are generally illiterate and fail to make 
their entries correctly or in such a manner that their 
purpose can be clearly understood. The wise secre- 
tary will east such an entry out or else send for further 
information, but tho too eager man will accept it and 
supply its deficiences from his imagination. A case 
before the Board of Appeals of the American Associa- 
tion at its recent sessions shows how such a man is 
liable to overstep himself. A horseman entered a 
horse at a western meeting last summer in the 2:40 
class, without specifyihg whether the animal whs a 
trotter or a pacor. Tho secretary, finding there was 
no 2:40 class for pacers, placed the name of the horse 
in the 2:40 trot After the entry list was published 
the secretary discovered that the horse was a pacer, 
and permitted him to start in the 2:35 pacing class, in 
which he won third money. A keen-eyed competitor 
in the race noUd the fact that the horso's name was 
not in the published list of entries to the 2:35 elass and 
protested the money. When tho case came before the 
Board of Appeals tho above facts were brought out, 
and the board promptly sustained tho protest and 
ordered the money redistributed. The owner of the 
horse deserved to lose his money for his slovenly way 
of making the entry, and it would servo the greedy 
secretary right if he was compelled to lose the en- 
trance fee. — Ex. 



Of the eleven trotters that were added to the 2:10 
list in 1901 only four started the season with records 
better than 2:12: throe had records better than 2:15 
and not so good as 2:12, two had records better than 
2:30 ;ind not so good as 2:15, and two had no records 
at all. Those of the latter class are Eloata, that 
trotted to a record of 2:08} and Captor that went into 
winter quarters with a mark of 2:09]. The greatest 
reduction of record shown by any of the newcomers to 
tho list was by May Allen, that lowered her previous 
mark of 2:25 to 2:09], a reduction of 15} seconds, and 
All Right is next, having reduced his record 10 sec- 
onde, from 2:19} to 2:09}. The best showing, made by 
the greon class was by Eloata 2:08}, Captor 2:09]. 
Country Jay 2:10}, Col. Cochran 2:lo], and Neva Sim 
mons 2:11}. These trotters not only distinguished 
themselves by taking fast records, but are numbered 
among tho largest money winners of tho past season. 
Eleata is not only the fastest greon trotter of 1901, but 
was, all things considered, the best race mare seen on 
the Grand Circuit last season. 



President H. I. Wilson of the Montana Jockey Club 
made the following announcement this week: "The 
Montana Jockey Club has decided to open its summer 
meeting at Butte on Saturday, June 14th. Racing 
will continue at Butte and Anaconda for at least sixty 
days. We guaranteo no purses loss than $250. It is 
our aim to carry cn high class racing, and also to 
secure the very best of officials, which will guarantee 
these results Our stakes will bo announced by Feb- 
ruary 20th." 

Ai.i.ston, Mass. 
lir. * .1 TutUU I was troubled with a severe attack of rheii 
ma t ism. and WM unable to walk After applying your Elixir a 
few times I became entirely well. I can recommend it as the bust 
liniment I have overseen Respectfully yours, 

Miss E. M. Stockwkli, 



February 1, 1902] 



3 



Notes and News, m 

Napa has claimed its dates. 




Woodland has done likewise. 



Bakersfield claims dates and is in line. 



The modern buyer's motto is "Show me.' 



Dates for the North Pacific Circuit have been claimed 
and announced. 

The State Fair will give the best meeting this year 
ever held in Sacramento. 



Old Joe Patchen 2:01}, it is said, has been perma- 
nently retired from the turf. 



Thirty mares have been mated with Dan Patch 2:04 
since he closed the campaign of 1901. 



Goshen Jim 2:10] sold for $750 at the John Splan 
Chicago sale. His new owner is John Hyan, of Minne- 
apolis. 

Charley Doble is wintering at Binghamton, N. Y., 
with Red Seal 2:10, Jack IX 2:101, Thompson 2:14.1 and 
others. _ 

There are 632 horses to pass through the Midwinter 
sale held by the Fasig-Tipton Company in New York 
this week. 

Eddie Rice states that he is ready to match Ana- 
conda 2:01if against Prince Alert 2:00f for any sum up 
to $10,000. 

As soon as the Breeders Association selects its dates 
it will announce its purses. There will be many of 
$1000 each. 

Fair Lawn, Ash Grove, Woodburn and Palo Alto 
will soon be named among the groat breeding farms 
of the past. 

The National Trotting Association's treasury bal- 
ance on Nov. 1, 1901, was reported by Secretary 
Gocher as being $20,044.26. 



Fenella, the dam of Janice 2:08} foaled a colt by Mc- 
Kinney 2:11 1 at the Meek Ranch, Haywards, one 
night this week, but the foal was dead when found. 

The Terrace Farm stable, of Titusville, Pa., includ- 
ing the $17,500 Beauseant and Terrace Queen 2:09}, in 
charge of trainer L. D. Shatter, will soon be shipped 
to Memphis. 

Andy McDowell promises to have a good stable of 
horses out this season. He will again race Martha 
Marshall 2:07}, besides several other record horses of 
prominence. 

The Northern California circuit will soon be organized 
and dates and purses announced. There will be plenty 
of racing for harness horses in the northern end of the 
State this year. 

Napa claims the week of August 11th to ltith in- 
clusive. Twelve purses for harness horses, ranging 
from $600 to $800 each, will be announced soon. Get 
your horses ready. 

Ed Sunderlin, of Lebanon, N. H., drove 60 races this 
past season, and was back of the money only four 
times. His best winner was the Governess 2:19], who 
won a piece of the purse in 15 races. 



Robert I. by Hambletonian Wilkes is at tha Alameda 
track. He has shown a quarter in 32 seconds without 
hopples and is a candidate for the 2:10 list this year 
that has a good chance of being elected. 



Welcome 2:10o, the handsomest stallion in California, 
will be in the stud again this year at the Meek Farm, 
Haywards, at $25 the season. The first and only Wel- 
come ever started, Iloilo, got a record last year 

Hope So, the dam of Heirlooms 2:11:|, Strathsc 2:13 
and Strathbelle 2:14}, also the grandam of Strath- 
meath 2:10} and Josephine P. 2:274. by Blue Bull, died 
recently at Delavin, Wis., the property of Phillips 
Bros. 

Geo. Gray, Superintendent of the Meek Estate at 
Haywards, has three very handsome and largo draft 
stallions for sale. They are all sure foal getters and 
will be money makers in any good location. See ad- 
vertisement. 

Boralma2:07 has about the biggest contract to fulfill 
of any horse that will be out this year. To defeat two 
such horses as Lord Derby 2:064. and The Abbot 2:03}, 
is an undertaking that about equals any of tho jobs 
given to Hercules. 

The early closing events for Read ville's Grand Cir- 
cuit meeting are: The Massachusetts, 2:12, trotting, 
$10,000; The Blue Hill, 2:30, trotting, $5,000; 2:24, pac- 
ing, $5,000; 2:10, pacing, $3,000; 2:16, pacing, $3,000; 
2:25, 2-year-olds, trotting, $2,000. 

A good broodmare should have size for the offspring 
is influenced largely by the dam in this respect, and 
she should have a cheerful and pleasant disposition, 
with plenty of vim. If she has speed all the better for 
the foal, but one cannot get a good driver out of a 
sluggish stumbling dam. 



William Harold 2:13}, sire of that great race mare 
Janice 2:08}. winner of the big race at Memphis last 
year, will make the season of 1902 at the Mick Farm, 
Haywards, at $40. This is one of the most promising 
sires of extreme speed in America. 



That old timo Grand Circuit trotter, So Long 2:131, 
formerly a bread-winner for Budd Doble and W.J. 
Andrews, has been sold by II. G. Kilkenny of Lowell, 
Mass.. to W. S. Adams of North Chelmsford. The 
son of Erelong is now 20 years old. 



One who has been down the big line several times 
says: " Don't monkey with the Grand Circuit unless 
you know your trotter can put iu five heats in 2:12 or 
better and your pacer can last through a long race 
whore the heats are all better than 2:10." 



George Starr will campaign Emma Winter by Di- 
rectum on the Grand Circuit this year. Since she 
took a three-year-old record of 2:14:} in 1890 Emma 
Winters has developed wonderfully, and Starr consid- 
ers her one of the highest class mares now in training. 



Uosa Sprague, the dam of McKinney 2:11}, will have 
another grandaughter in tho list this year barring 
accidents. The dam of Fereno 2:10j has a four year 
old by Allie Wilkes that is said to be tho pacing 
wonder of Yarmouth, Mass , and capable of a 2:10 
record. 

Twenty-three head of Mr. Billings" horses are in 
training at Memphis, including Lucille 2:07, Little Boy 
2:01.',, Franker 2:11, Ma/.ctto 2:04',, Hontas Crook 2:074, 
Free Bond 2:04}, Frazier 2:07}, Dr. Monica] 2:09|, Cap- 
tor 2:09',, Battleton 2:09^, D"r. Book 2:10, Jaymaker 
2:154 and Louise Jefferson 2:17} 



"The Brighton Beach plan," which is the name 
given by the Eastern journals to the plan that sends 
all horses to the stables thatdo not win a heat in three, 
is being exploited as a new thing. Tho California 
State Agricultural Society has followed this plan for 
several years with success acd satisfaction. 



Fred W. Thompson of this city, who for several 
years held the position of Secretary of the Golden Gate 
Park Driving Club, has again been chosen to fill that 
position. Mr. Thompson is a painstaking and efficient 
officer, and very popular with the members of tho 
club. A better choice could not have been made. 



At the time Directum was purchased by Mr. Savage, 
of Minneapolis, he also bought a weanling filly by that 
horse, hi^ dam being Janie T. 2:14, as a two year old. 
They havo been leading it some since getting it home, 
and have discovered that it has more speed on the trot 
than a pacer they have with a record of 2:22, it having 
on several occasions been able to outfoot the pacer in 
question, 

While book-betting has always been subordinated 
to auctions and mutuals on the Eastern trotting 
tracks, it has been getting in its deadly work until 
there is a genoral outcry against it from horsemen 
and turf writers. It would be a good thing to abolish 
the evil altogether, and the N. T. A. and A. T. A. 
could do no better act than to make a rule prohibiting 
book-betting on harness races. 



Ashland Wilkes heads the list of sires of new stand- 
ard performers for 1901, with twenty to his credit. 
Axtell stands second with fifteen and McKinney third 
with twelve. Allerton, Direct, Expedition and Sphinx 
are next with ten each. Of the forty-three sires with 
five or more to their credit, all but six have standard 
records. Breeding to trotters seems to be the popular 
and successful plan of getting them nowadays. 



To become a successful trainer requires the most ex- 
cellent judgment, the greatest amount of skill and an 
almost perfect knowledge of tho horse, his disposition, 
temperament and constitution. The work that one 
horse must have to condiiion him would kill another, 
and to make this distinction requires an ability pos- 
sessed by few in the business. Thoso that do possess 
it have risen to the front rank in tho profession. 



C. K. G. Billings has announced his intention of 
sending the world's wagon pacing champion Little 
Boy 2:014, against Star Pointer's record of 1.69}. 
Scott McCoy, trainer of tho Billings stable, will be 
allowed to race Little Boy against Star Pointer's long 
long standing mark. Tho attempt will be made at one 
of tho grand circuit meetings, and if unsuccessful an- 
other attempt will be made at the fail meeting at 
Memphis. 

It is stated that Mi'. E. 10. Smathors purposes to 
start Lord Derby in tho matinee races this summer, 
and that ho will endeavor to wrest tho Boston Cup 
from Harry Devereux. It will be necessary for Mr. 
Smathers to belong to a matinee club that is a mem- 
ber of tho League of Amatour Drivors before ho can 
participate in these events, and it is probable that ho 
would bo ineligible to compete for the Boston Cup in 
any event. 

Bell Bird, daughter of Electioneer and Beautiful 
Bells, sold for $750 at tho Palo Alto Sale. Sho wont to 
tho bid of II. S. Hogobo-mi of Sacramento, who im- 
mediately booked her to Martin Carter's great stallion 
Nutwood Wilkes 2:16}, sire of John A. McKerron 2:06| 
to wagon, and tho foal" will bo worth two or three times 
tho amount paid for the mare. Belle Bird is now in 
foal to Iran Alto 2:12}, and this foal will be worth a 
lot of money. Mr. Hogoboom has for many years 
been one of tho most energetic and enterprising horse* 
men in California and though ho has had his share of 
bad luck and probably a little more, ho has never 
cried quits but is still in the ring. That he is on tho 
right track now is as certain as taxes. 



Mr. M. E McHenry, the reinsman whose name and 
fame are intimately associated with Anaconda, Search- 
light, Dan Patch and a host of other equino celebrities, 
writes Mr. E. J. Tranter, as follows, viz: "Replying 
to your letter of Jan. 2, will say when wo left Califor- 
nia with the Keating string of hoi 'sos, the spring of 
1899, Agitato could beat both Searchlight 2:03}, and 
Anaconda 2:0Iij. and had he not been taken sick :it 
Denver, I think he would have won every race he was 
entered in." 

It is said that Senator Frank Jones, proprietor of 
the Maplewoo.l Farm in New Hampshire, will never 
be able to attend to business matters again, as after a 
long and severe attack of pneumonia he has been 
attacked with softening of the brain, from which there 
is no hope of relief. No sadder news has been received 
in the circle of horsemen than this. Mr. Jones is one 
of tho most intelligent, progressive and enthusiastic 
breeders of harness horses in America, and his loss 
will be a most serious one. 



Secretary W. H. Gocher has sent out official not'< e 
that the biennial meeting or congress of members ol 
the National Trotting Association will be held at the 
Murray Hill Hotel, Now York, at noon, Wednosdav. 
February 12 1902, in accordance with Article VIII, 
Section 1 of the By-Laws. In accordance with a reso- 
lution adopted at the congress in 1898, the committee 
on credentials will meet at the Murray Hill Hotel, at 
10 o'clock A. M., on Wednesday, P'ebruary 12, 1902, to 
receivo credentials from delegates. Any proposed 
changes in tho rules should be sent to the secretary te 
bo submitted to tho rule committee. 



At the Walnut Grove Stock Farm there are five 
three year olds by Nushagak that will compare favor 
ably with the same number by any one horse ; n Amer 
ica. One is out of the mare Nosegay by Langton ano 
trotted in a workout last August a last half in 1:124, 
last quarterin 34secondsand lasteighth in 16| seconds 
There is also one from the mare Wordllower (dam of 
Prince Ansel 2:20 and Seylex 2.15} ) that has trotted a 
quarter in 38 seconds with very little work. The 
others are just as good considering the wor k given 
them. The Nosegay and Wood flower colts are both 
in tho Occident and Stanford Stakes for 1902. 



A handsome beveled-edge card containing a phot o 
graph of the stallion Rey Direct 2:10 and four of his 
yearlings has just been printed for Geo. A. Davis of 
Pleasanton, owner of this fast and good looking son of 
Direct 2:05}. The picture is a true likeness of the 
horse and yearlings and no handsomer family ever 
posed before a camera. Roy Direct is at Los Angeles 
for the season and is having quite a number of very 
choice mares booked to him. That ho will produce 
extreme speed is as certain as anything can be. He is 
one of the most vigorous sires in California, as is 
proven by tho fact that thirty-one mares bred to him 
in 1900 produced thirty-one foals. 

The 15th Agricultural District, comprising the 
county of Kern, will give a fair and race meeting this 
year during the week preceding tho Los Angeles meet- 
ing, and has put in a claim for '.hat date. The Bakers- 
field Driving Club will donate $2500, the business men 
of Bakersfield $3000 more and the association has a Stat e 
appropriation of $2500. With this amount of monfj 
in sight there is not a doubt about tho success of thi 
fair and purses will be offered so as to attract all the 
best horses in the State. Bakersfield is one of tin 
liveliest towns on the Pacific Slope, is in the centre ol 
the oil belt and a thriving, booming place. The 
Bakersfield fair will bo a hummer. 



Maggie N. by Hambletonian Wilkes out of Anna 
Belle by Dawn is now in the hands of C. F. Bunch at 
San Jose and bids fair to bo tho host of Anna Belle's 
foals. Tho daughter of Dawn has produced tho trotter 
La Bolle 2:16 and Robert I., one of the fastest green 
pacers in California, and this statement in regard to 
Maggie N. is made with knowledge of the facts. 
Maggie N. is the property of Green Meadow Stock 
Farm, Santa Clara. This farm has also turned over 
to Mr. Bunch for training Dexter Wilkes by Hamble- 
tonian Wilkes out of Balladina, trial 2:15, by Gladiator, 
next dam thoroughbred. This young horso is one of 
tho best prospects in this part of tho State 



Tho Wisconsin Association of Matinee Driving Clubs 
was organized in Sheboygan, January 8th, by about 
twenty -live representatives of the gentlemen's driving 
clubs of the State. Tho following officers were elected: 
President, W. E. Tallmadge, Sheboygan; Vice-Presi- 
dent; A M. Murphy, Green Bay; Secretary, T. M. 
Bowler, Sheboygan; Treasurer, Fred Carney, Jr., 
Marinette. Directors — W. S. Carpenter, Menominee; 
F. B. Desnoyes, Green Bay; J. H. Keith, Manitowoc; 
R. L Whltebtll, Sheboygan; Charles Fose, Appleton, 
and W. H. Ellis, Milwaukee. Board of Appeals— Fred 
Carney, Jr., three years; M. H. Murphy, Manitowoc, 
two years, and F. B. Desnoyes, one year. Six clubs 
signed the agreement. 

There is undoubtedly something to be said on both 
sides of tho proposition to shorten the distance in all 
races over milo tracks. In races between fast horses 
which have become classed it is of course as fair for 
one as for another, and tho owner whose hor?e by a 
slight mistake lands behind the Hag in one race, can 
hope for better luck tho next time. It is in the colt 
stakes and futurities that a shorter distance is likely to 
prove harmful. These races are supposed to bo given 
for - the purpose of encouraging breeders to persevere in 
a business which at tho best is one of many disappoint' 
ments. Under the present rule very many of tho races 
prove a walk-over, and in quite a largo percentage 
some youngster, by distancing the field, gets tho whole 
purse. This is all right tor tho fortunate owner, but 
the others who havo been to tho trouble and expense 
of breeding and training their youngsters with the 
hope of winning at least a part of tho purse are likely 
to become diseouragod and givo up breeding altogether 



4 



[February 1, 1902 



The Breeding of Bloomsbury. 

The mystery supposed to enshroud the breeding of 
the thoroughbred staliion Bloomsbury (sire of the 
phenomenal Josie G.) on the dam's side of the house, 
has been cleared away, thanks to the splendid memory 
of the great California turfman and breeder of "the 
days of old, the day9 of gold,'' Achilles F. Grigsby of 
Napa, Cal. 

In a letter to the writer, Mr. Grigsby takes one back 
to the year 1850 or 1851, when the gold excitement in 
this State was at its fiercest and when the tide of 
immigration was at its highest stage. The search for 
California's principal product, however, had been so 
absorbing that the possibilities of this section as a 
racing or breeding center had been well nigh over" 
looked, the result being that Mr. Grigsby and the 
brothers Williamson, owners of the great Belmont 
(sire of Mamie Langford, Owen Dale, Dashaway and 
other celebrities of after years) were among the very 
few owners of thoroughbreds in this State, and '-quar- 
ter horses" were consequently the rage. Thinking 
that this, the land of gold and sunshine, would be an 
excellent part of the world in which to make a good- 
sized '•pile," David Hughes of Kentucky, a veteran 
racing man, sent his son Andrew across the plains 
about the year 1850, with a bay mare by Trumpetoi- 
(son of Sir Solomon and a Hickory mare) out of Sophy 
Wynn, by Blackburn's Whip; second dam Sophy 
(Old) by Blackburn's Buzzard and third dam by Col- 
umbus; fourth dam by Meade's Celer, and fifth dam 
an imported mare. Sophy Wynn was owned until an 
old mare by Dr. K. Warfield of Fayette county. Ken- 
tucky, the man that bred the immortal Lexington and 
many others of note. The supposition is that Sophy 
Wynn passed into the hands of David Hughes along 
about 1837 or 1838, that Mr. H. was a man not particu- 
lar about registering his thoroughbreds, in fact, at 
that day there Was no American Stud Book, and he 
may not have been at all prominent as a breeder and 
racing man, or might have lived in an obscure portion 
of the Grand Old Commonwealth. The Stud Book 
(see vol. 2. page 320) shows that Sophy Wynn had 
foals by Trumpetor when she belonged to Dr. War- 
field and thai she had foals the date of whose breeding 
was not known 

This bay Trumpetor mare, afterward called Old 
Sopha, was brought across the plains to California by 
the adventurous young Kontuckian, Anarew Hughes, 
who, upon his safe arrival in the land of gold, dis- 
covered that thoroughbreds were exceedingly scarce 
and that the only kind of race he could engage his 
marc in was at a quarter of a mile or quarter mile and 
repeat. As she had a high turn of speed. Old Sopha 
was entered in these turf events, and ran with no little 
success, and it was only natural that turfmen and race 
goers of that era like Theodore Winters, should re- 
member her as "a quarter mare." 

Notwithstanding this belief, Mr. Grisby, who after- 
ward purchased her of Andrew Hughes, did so with 
the knowledge that the mare was not only a thorough- 
bred, but a well bred one into the bargain He has 
preserved tho podigreo as given him in writing by 
Andrew Hughes in the early fifties and sent mea copy, 
which read: "Old Sopha's sire T rum pat or, he by 
Solomon, dam Hickory, second dam imported mare 
Trumpetta." (It should be Sir Solomon and dam by 
Hickory, but it served to identify tho mare neverthe- 
less.) Then it went on: "Old Sopha's dam Sopha 
Wynn, by Blackburn's Whip, second dam by Buzzard; 
third dam by Columbus, " which is exactly correct, 
according to the stud book compiler, Col. Bruce. 
After her racing days were over Old Sopha, as the 
Trumpator mare was known, was bred to several thor- 
oughbred stallions, among the number Bulwer, a gray 
horse by Grey Eagle from Julia Ann, by Medoc. She 
foaled, late one November, presumably about 1850, a 
wee gray filly called Deuces, which, on account of its 
coming into the world two months before it should, 
was at a great disadvantage in a racing way. How- 
ever, Deuces was tiained for Mr. Grigsby and raced 
some, and sent to the stud, was bred in 1800, to Dash- 
away, a superior race horse of tho early sixties by 
Belmontout of Lady Davis, by Red Bill (son of Medoc.) 
The result of this union was Cheripe, a bay filly, foaled 
1861. J. S. Gibson, then, as now, of Williams, Colusa 
county, 9aw Cheripe as a yearling, and purchased her 
through Mr. Grisby's trainer, Jim Merrill, and she 
was entered in one or more races by Mr. Gibson in 
1804. 

Langforl, the first really great racer bred in Cali- 
fornia, a son of Williamson's Belmont and Liz Givens 
by imp. Langford, was owned in his older years by the 
late Hon. John Boggs, of Colusa county, who was ever 
an ardent lover of racing and race horses and a rider 
of no mean reputation in his young days. Mr. Gibson 
bred Cheripe (the daughter of Dashaway) to Langford 
in 1874, and in 187") she foaled a bay filly, which was 
called Lady Langford. The last-named was bred to 
Three Cheers (thon owned by W. M. Murry of Sacra- 
mento) in 1892. and in 1893 she foaled Bloomsbury, a 



bay colt of beautiful proportions and which as a two 
year old proved a veritable speed marvel, defeating 
the best horses of any age in training in this State over 
the shorter routes. Bloomsbury has proven as phe- 
nomenal a sire as he was a racer, but as Mr. Gibson 
had not been careful in the matter of .•egistering his 
horse's dams, and had not secured evidence enough to 
satisfy tho Stud Book registrar that ho was a pure 
thoroughbred, the matter was plased in my hands for 
investigation, the result being that through the kind- 
ness of Messrs. A. T. Grigsby and Thoodoro Winters 
(the latter owned Deuces and bred Queen by Norfolk 
from her) I have been able to place evidence before 
the American Stud Book Registrar which I hope and 
believe will enable Mr. Gibson to register Bloomsbury 's 
progeny from imp. Czarina as thoroughbreds, which 
they undoubtedly are. The pedigree of Bloomsbury 
therefore now reads: 

Bloomshl:rv, b s, foaled 1893. Sired by Three 
Cheers (son of imp. Hurrah and Young Fashion, by 
imp. Monarch). 

1st dam, Lady Langford, by Langford. 

2d dam, Cheripe, by Dashaway. 

3d dam, Deuces (Lady Mace), by Bulwer. 

4th dam, Old Sopha, by Trumpator. 

5th dam, Sophy Wynn. by Blackburn's Whip. 

0th dam, by Blackburn's Buzzard. 

7th dam, by Columbus. 

8th dam, by Meade's Celer. 

9th dam, an Imported mare. 

Ralph H. TOZBR. 

Size of Thoroughbreds. 

It has been a very general view that the race horse 
has increased considerably in size during the last hun- 
dred years. There was reason to allow that the late 
Admiral Rous was correct in stating that it was a hand 
from about 1700 to 1860, the dat\ or very nearly so, 
when tho Ad rairal wrote his well known letters, says 
"Augu' 1 " in Sinn-tiny Lift:. There have been several 
changes in the last forty years, and those who have 
watched racing closely may have seen that there are 
more big horses and mares than could have been found 
at the date in question, but, generally speaking, there 
have been more bad horses produced from this multi- 
plicity in size. 

Take tho yearlings sent up for sale, or located in the 
racing stables from private studs, the large majority 
will be over 15.2 before they reach theage of two years. 
This moans another two inches in growth before they 
are two years and a half, and so the average size 
would be 10 hands, with many considerably over. 

There is certainly some advantage, on the rule that 
a good big one is better than a good little one, but 
then in former timos where there was one good big 
one there were five good little ones. In giving that 
estimation there seems moro reason why the better 
levelness was maintained before tho first, half of the 
last century than now, as big horses of their day like 
Lottery, who stood 10 hands, had better chances with 
small mares. Good little horses were quite plentiful 
during the twenties and thirties, as there was Little 
Red Rover only 14.3, Perion not quite 15, Middleton 

15. 1, Camel under 15.2, Mulatto the same, Gainsborough 

15.2, Lamplighter 15.1 and many others. 
Touchstone, of whom there was a beautiful drawing 

by the senior Herring some three weeks after he won 
the St. Leger, is described by the great artist as medium 
size, which, I suppose, would be 15.2, and truly tho 
great Westminster horse set the stamp on our thor- 
oughbreds. Mated to a tall, somewhat leggy mare 
like Crucifix, he got them bigger than himself, as is 
noticeable in Surplice, and still more so in Fontifex, 
brother to Surplice, as the latter was a very big horse 
indeed. 

At the same time, though. Fontifex came back to 
regulation size when mated to probably half-bred pony 
mares on the Welsh border, as he got beautiful hunt- 
ers when so located, and the pretty little horses, Flash 
in the Fan and Heidelburg, the latter a perfect picture. 
In and out for size, tho Touchstones were of tho great- 
est use to the country, as even the little Flash in the 
Pan, who was not more than 15. 1, got magnificent 
weight carrying nunters, worth from 400 to 700 apiece. 
So it was with all the descendants of Touchstone, as if 
they happened to be of the commanding order, like 
Atherstone, they invariably got level Stock. 



A writer in the London Sportsman picks for the win- 
ner of the Kngli9h Derby this year a colt called Cup- 
bearer. He is owned by the Duke of Westminster and 
is being trained by John Porter, who has already 
trained a half dozen Derby winners. The colt is by 
Orme, son of Ormonde, and out of Kissing Cup by 
Hampton. Porter is training sixty horses at the 
present time and Cupbearer is said to be the best one 
of the entire lot. 

Hardly a day passes but one hears of a big price 
being refused for a colt or filly by McKinney 2:llj. 
There is no stallion in America whoso get is more in 
demand. 



Race Horse and Sire. 

Few stallions in America attract the attention from 
breeders that Diablo 2:09} did last year. His son, Sir 
Albert S. 2:08',, was the champion of the California 
circuit, and his daughter Diodene 2:10', was the cham- 
pion pacer of Oregon and Washington. Tags, a 
daughter of his that went East, was a big winner and 
reduced her record to 2:11 1 Kl Diablo, a son, raced 
well, won a large amount and lowered his mark to 
2:12], while six of tho Diablo's entered the list during 
the year and quite a number that raced lowered their 
former records. Diablo had a reputation as a champion 
race horse and sire of great speed prior to last year, 
and the performances of his get simply added to it- 
He made a better season in the stud than ever before' 
got a better class of mares and more of them than in 
previous years and for the first time in his life got a 
really good start as a sire. This year he will attract 
to his court some of the best mares in California and 
that his fame will increase from year to year is now as 
certain as fate. He has to his credit in the 2:15 list 
Clipper 2:06, Sir Albert S. 2:08}, Diodene 2:10',, Daeda- 
lion 2:11, Diawood 2:11, Tags fell}, Hijo el Diablo 2:111, 
Kl Diablo 2:12} and Inferno 2:15, with a half dozen in 
sight this year. 

It has been claimed in the columns of this journal 
for several years past that tho only trouble with the 
Diablos was their extreme early speed, which so many 
trainers are unable to handle. Permit them to reach 
tho age of maturity before giving them hard cam" 
paigns and they will prove iron horses. Flesh and 
bone can stand only a certain amount of strain, but 
when some of our trainers get possession of a colt that 
can show a 2:20 gait as a two year old, they imagine 
that miles at that rate of speed is beneficial. There 
aro a dozen Diablo's in California that would have had 
records below 2:15 had they not been worked to death 
as colts. There has never been a horse standing for 
service in this State whose produce showed speed with 
more uniformity, and whenever his colts and fillies aie 
way wise they seem anxious to show speed of a high 
order, and being very ambitious will show too much of 
it unless restrained. Nor has any stallion ever begat 
more good looks and style than Diablo. Who ever 
saw a real homely colt by this horse? And as for his 
breeding, there is none better anywhere. 

His sire, Charles Derby 2:20, was a fast racehorse 
and is a great sire, as he has produced three in the 2:10 
list. His grand sire, Stein way, held the champion 
three-year old trotting record, and has produced a son 
that still holds the three-year-old pacing record — 
Klatawah 2:051 — besides three others in 2:10. Charles 
Derby 's dam was Katy G. by Electioneer, one of the 
greatest of sires, and she is one of the greatest of 
broodmares, having produced five with records from 
2:05] to 2:25. 

The dam of Diablo is the great broodmare Bertha. 
She is tho dam of tivo that have fast records — Diablo 
2:09',, Bit 2:121. Don Derby 2:131. Ed Lafferty 2:10i 
and tho colt Jay Eff B.>e that took a yearling record 
of 2:201. Bertha is by Alcantara, a sire of 149 in 2:3<». 
a son of George Wilkes and the great broodmare Alma 
Mater, dam of 8 in 2:30. Bertha's dam is Barcena, a 
great broodmare: her grandam is Blandina, a great 
broodmare, and her great-grandam is another great 
broodmare. No stallion can show a more extended 
list of gieat producing stallions and mares is his pedi- 
gree than Diablo. 

When it comes to conformation and good looks 
Diablo is right up in the front ranks, even when the 
A polios of equine beauty are on parade. There is not 
a qualification desirable in a sire that he does not pos- 
sess. It is a pleasure to note that in his new home in 
Woodland, Yolo county, where he mado a season last 
year and will be located in the future, he is highly 
appreciated. Already mares from all parts of the 
State have been booked to him, although his fee has 
been raised to $50 for the season of 1902. Those who 
breed to Diablo can rest assured that they could not 
have selected any bettor bred stallion, better individ- 
ual or better sire, had they looked the country over. 
Send to his owner, Wm. Murray, at Woodland, for 
Diablo's tabulated pedigree and terms. 



We wish to call attention to tho a J vertisement of 
tho Oakland Carriage and Implement Co. in to-day 's 
issue of the Brekder and Sportsman. Mr. Stein, 
tho manager of this firm, is a lover of the trotting 
horse and spares no pains to secure the lightest and 
easiest running wagons and the neatest harness that 
are built in the United States for his patrons. This 
firm has the agency and keeps in stock the celebrated 
F.iber sulkies and speed wagons and they have now on 
exhibition a 50 lb. Faber piano box buggy which is the 
finest and lightest speed buggy ever built. Horsemen 
will find everything that is necessary to get to the 
front, of the very best quality and at the most reason- 
able price" at this popular Oakland establishment. 



Like all good things, Jackson's Napa Soda hasa 
dozen counterfeits. Watch out ! 



February 1. 1902 ] 



5 



To Be Mated With Cresceus 2:02 1-2. 

Mr. C. A. Harrison of Los Angeles, owner of the 
mare Little Maid 2:18, gives the following interesting 
information about his mare which has been sent East 
to be bred to Cresceus: 

"Little Maid made her record in a winning race to 
high wheels at Portland, Oregon. She is by Rock- 
wood, he by Fleetwood and he by Happy Medium. 
Her dam was Pocahontas by Hambletonian Mambrino. 
sire of Caryle Carne 2:11* and many other good ones; 
sjcond dam by Black Stranger, son of Gen. Knox; 
third dam by Waterloo, the first trotter with a record 
ever owned in Oregon; he was a Morgan horse and a 
good one. Little Maid has paced a quarter in 30 seconds 
for me and snown me that she is a mare of excep- 
tional speed and disposition as a road mare. I never 
g:iw her equal. The pleasantest vacation I ever had 
was the two weeks I drove her on the San Francisco 
speedway, and I failed to find a roadster that could 

Jtstep her, and I also failed to find one in Los Angeles. 

"In shipping her away to the Ketcham farm I did 
not mean to deprecate any of the sires of California, 
as I consider that this State has as many first-class 
stallions as any State in the Union, with possibly a 
few exceptions. I selected Cresceus as I consider him 
the greatest trotter it has ever been my pleasure to 
see, and besides I thought as Little Maid was the fast- 
est pacer I ever drove or owned, and this being my 
first attempt at raising a fast one, I would select the 
fastest and most popular stallion. I am sure Little 
Maid will be a speed producer, as I own her son, 
Printers' Ink by Altamont, and in sixty days' work I 
drove him a mile in 2:26i. I then turned him over to 
I. C. Mosier, and in two weeks' work he trotted a mile 
in 2:22^, last half in 1:10}, last quarter in :t4 seconds 
and la9t eighth in 16 seconds; so I guess in breeding 
the Maid to Cresceus I may get a fair proportion of 
the speed mixture. It is my intention to race Printers' 
Ink the coming season. I will nominate the prospect- 
ive young Cresceus in all the best stakes. A colt or 
filly without stake engagements is a poor investment. 

1 believe it behooves all California breeders to patron- 
ize the Breeders Stake, the Occident and the Stanford. 
Yours truly, C. A. Harrison." 

A Speed and Stop Check. 

An ingenious little device that is proving a boon to 
over-burdened horses and is bringing woe to many a 
careless, dilatory or brutal driver is to be seen nowa- 
days od the delivery wagons of many big mercantile 
houses, breweries and truck companies of New York 
and other large cities. In these days of sharp com- 
petition and good wages it is essential to the success of 
large business enterprises that the greatest possible 
service be obtained from men and horses alike, but 
wise employers, who take pride in their handsome de- 
livery animals and pay tidy sums for stanch horseflesh, 
find no economy in overworking their draught ani- 
mals. But try as they would, the managers of many 
business concerns having fifty or a hundred or more 
horses found it almost an impossibility to place the 
responsibility for abuses until the "speed and stop 
check," or indicator, of which there are several pat- 
terns, came into the market to aid the work of the 
Bergh Society, delivery superintendent and stable 
bosses. 

Now, if Fritz or Patrick stops at his favorite saloon 
to play a game of pinochle with his cronies and then 
compels his horses to make up the lost time afterward, 
it is all indicated on the "speed and stop check," 
modeled after the fashion of the cyclometer of bicycle 
fame. The indicator is about the shape of an ordinary 
alarm clock, with a face about five inches across and 
divided by minute and hour lines. A clock hand 
moves continuously, but another dial is so arranged 
that it records only while the wagon moves, stamping 
each quarter mile as it is wheeled off. The indicator 
is attached to a rear wheel, and if a driver stops the 
time hand goes on, but the distance marker does not. 
With the number of miles traveled, the time consumed 
and the stops all indicated, it is easy for the employer 
to tell at a glance if his horses have been overdriven 
and if the driver has been attending to duty promptly. 
— Horseman. 

Barb Wire Cuts. 

The following is said to be the best treatment for 
horses that have been cut by barb wire: If cut severe 
tie short in stable to keep from biting cut, and fill 
immediately with common salt. If required to wash, 
use very strong salt brine; sprinkle salt in until it is 
healed nicely, as it will commence to do shortly. 
Never use any grease or greasy salve on cuts on 
horses. This is just as good for any cut on horses. 



Thomas W. Lawson has engaged the services of 
Tom Marsh, late of Maplewood Farm, Portsmouth, 
N. H., as trainer and driver for the coming year. 



A Confidential Query. 

Did you never buy a pold brick? Honest' Cross roux heart I 
\ as you ever "up against it" with no friend to take vour part? 
U. you joke about the farmer with his whiskers an" his wav 
or lettin' people do him up because he's such a jay 
But was you never vanquished by some fellow crlttei s art 1 
Old you never buy a cold brick? Honest? Cross your heart? 
Did you never Rive your money to some man that put on airs 
An find that all he left you w as certitlcates of shares* 
Did you never place your hopes upon some promise vory dear. 
An watch yer hopes all vauish as you waited, year by year? 
Did your folly never lead you up to disappointments smart? 
Did you never buy a pold brick? Honest? Cross your heart? 

— Wa*/thif/toH sfiti . 

"Tribe" or "Family." 

It has become a common practice among writers of 
trotting turf literature to designate certain breeds of 
horses as "families," as for example, the Wilkes 
family, the Electioneer family, the Pancoast family 
and the rest, writes "Wirelight" in the Kentucky Stock 
Farm. Tribe is the better word, for in a strict sense 
stallions are not the founders of families, that being a 
prerogative of the dam. As applied to the human 
race it is an accepted theory that the "mother rules 
the family, the fathor the house." It is a well settled 
principle among breeders of thoroughbred horses that 
the honor of founding a family belongs to a particular 
mare. The Levity family furnishes an example 
Levity was a mare by tho imported stallion Trustee 
and the family founded by her is one of the most cele- 
brated known to the running turf. The name of her 
sire is never mentioned in connection with her family 
or its descendants. A family supposes the closest 
alliance; a tribe supposes no closer relation than that 
created by a common interest. Family is confined to 
a comparatively small number, while tribe is a term 
of extensive import. Hamburg is a descendant of the 
Reel family, and while he was sired by Hanover, by 
Hindoo, he belongs neither to tho family from which 
Hanover came nor to that from which Hindoo sprang- 
Each of the three horses named descended from a 
different family, as equine families are reckoned, and 
necessarily so, for the polygamous habits of a stallion 
renders it impossible for him to become tho founder 
of a family. 

The systematic breeding of the light harness horse 
does not date back far enough to mako it possible to 
properly classify many of the trotting families, and it 
will not be attempted here, but to illustrate the idea 
it may be stated that the tribe commonly known as 
the "Pancoast family" is in truth the Mary Mambrino 
family. This mare was sired by Mambrino Patchen, 
dam Belle Wagner, and from Mary Mambrino we 
have Beatrice, dam of Patron 2:14|, Prodigal 2:16, 
Patronage (sire of Alix 2:03iJ), and of the dams of 
Patriot 2:24, Grand Baron 2:12^ and Barondaie 2:11} ; 
Elvira 2:181, dam of Ponce de Leon 2:13 and Queens- 
ware 2:25; Marcella, dam of the dam of Marcus 2:21, etc. 

The named produce of Mary Mambrino and tho 
produce of her daughters and grandaughters properly 
belong to the family founded by her and should be so 
classed in her honor. But while Patron, Prodigal, 
Patronage and Ponce de Leon are descendants of the 
Mary Mambrino family, it cannot justly be claimed 
that a colt sired by either of them is necessarily a de- 
scendant of the same family, unloss it can be shown 
that the colt traces in tail line to Mary Mambrino. 
Thus, while Ponce de Leon is a descendant of that 
family, his daughter Prelatess "2:15J is a member of 
tho family founded by Primrose, the lino of descent 
being Black Rose by Tom Teemor, Primrose by Ab- 
dallah, Primula by Connaught, Primacy by Belmont, 
Prelacy (dam of Prelatess) by Lord Russell. From 
the same point of reasoning Alix could not properly 
be placed to the credit of tho Mary Mambrino family, 
albeit she was a daughter of a descendant of that 
family. 

The time will come when writers for the turf press 
and compilers of catalogues will give honor whoro 
honoris due by naming the trotting families aftor 
their real founders. In that time we shall hear Im- 
petuous 2:13 and Extasy 2:11), spoken of as the de. 
scondants of the Kathleen family instead of tho Dic- 
tator or the Baron Wilkes family, as the case may be. 
and the Alma Mater, tho Midnight, the Betty Brown, 
tho Millionaire, the Miss Russell and tho Waterwitch 
families will become as familiar to the public as tho so- 
called Electioneer and Wilkes families are at tho pres- 
ent time. 

Diodine 2:10} ny Diablo 2:00} was tho sonsation of tho 
Splan sale at Chicago and brought the highest price— 
$2050. Diodine was bred and raised in this State, and 
purchased three years ago, when she was a throe year 
old, by Dr. Powell Reeves, of Seattle, who afterwards 
sold her. She took her record at North Yakima, 
Washington, last fall. Him- purchaser is Deter Truax, 
of Eau Claire, Wisconsin, who will place her in tho 
hands of Charles De Ryder to campaign, and he in- 
tends entering her in tho fast pacing classes on the 
Grand Circuit. Eastern horsemen say that Diodine 
looks very much like Edith W. 2:05. 

Sober up on Jackson's Napa Soda. 



Getting Ready at Aptos. 

Down at the pretty half-mile track at the Spreckels 
Farm near Aptos. Santa Cruz county, Sandy Smith 
began work a few weeks ago on twelve young horses 
bred at the farm, and this week took up a dozen more 
to put in shape for the Fasig-Tiplon May sale at 
Cleveland. 

Among them is a chestnut mare by Dexter l'riuce 
out of a mare by Antevolo, grandam the dam of Crown 
Point 2:17A, that will be one of the greatest show mares 
ever led into the ring whenever she is entered in a 
horse show. She is a beauty and Sandy stands ready 
to go broko if there is anything that can outshow her. 
Besides, she is an M. <V M. candidate and at Cleveland 
will show as much speed as anything offered at that 
great speed sale. No hotter gaited one ever wore a 
trotting harness. 

Venus II 2:11} was a very handsome and speedy 
mare but she has a full brother in this lot that 
marched a quarter in 40 seconds after being driven 
two or three times, and he was never handled a day in 
his life until Sandy took hold of him last month. 

A full brother to Czarina 2:13}, is one of tho most 
level headed geldings ever driven, and is a striking 
contrast to bis fast sister in disposition although ho 
shows all the speed she did, and more at the same ago 
having trotted quarters in 35 seconds already. 

A pacing queen is a filly by Cupid 2:18 out of Grade 
S., the dam of Dione 2:07}. This is as slick gaited a 
pacer as any man over saw and can step a quarter in 
35 seconds or better right now. She was never 
handled until this winter. 

Of the twelve that Sandy is working on there is not 
one that has a blemish or any unsoundness, which is a 
good showing to start on. 

Aptos Stock Farm turns out as groat a proportion of 
good lookers as any farm in America, due in a great 
measure to the abundance of feed given the colts while 
growing, and the fact that they have many hills to 
climb while young makes them strong in wind and 
limb. The greatest money winner of last year, while 
bred at Palo Alto, was sired by the Aptos Stock 
Farm's stallion Dexter Prince, and there are quite a 
number of his get, fully as promising, that are to go 
to the Cleveland sale in May. 



A Plain Business Proposition. 

There are numerous ad vantages to bo gained through 
a judiciously displayed advertisement of a first-class 
harness stallion. Very few owners but what believe 
they have a good stallion — a prominent sire already or 
the making of one; a stallion bred well enough to mate 
with the best mares within reach and one that should 
be afforded ample opportunity to demonstrate his 
superiority. Nearly every owner with whom we havo 
been acquainted entertains a belief similar to the 
above. Such a belief is natural and to be commended, 
for one must believe in his own stallion before he can 
expect the public to think well of him. A suitable 
advertisement, judiciously placed, calls the attention 
of horsemen (everywhere) to the fact that you have a 
horse worthy of being advertised; that you have a 
good horse— one that you believe in and one that you 
want everyone elso to believe in. Tho fact that you 
advertise him is ample evidence of the faith you en" 
tertain. It also demonstrates tho fact that you want 
to cultivate a similar faith in owners of brood mares. 
Few men will continue advertising a stallion that they 
have lost faith in; the public has long ago recognized 
this fact and prefer doing business with the enthusiastic 
owner. And, again, a judicious advertisement locates 
the stallion with tho public, and they naturally look 
to the locality in which he is owned for colts or aged 
horses sired by him. Many a good sale has been 
brought about in just this way. Not long since a 
business like owner told the writer that his stallion 
advertisements had always paid him in the number of 
sales made through them. The advertisement located 
his horse, its continued publication attracted the 
attention of buyers, and numerous sales were the 
result. As a general proposition, it does not pay to 
hide the identity and location of a good stallion. Such 
a horse should bo kopt before tho public, in season and 
out of season, during good times and bad times. It is 
money well oxponded, this thing of judiciously adver. 
tising a well-bred and promising harness stallion.— 
U'txti rn Unrsi man. 

Lively times are promised at the meeting of tho 
stewards of the Grand Circuit, at Detroit, the last of 
this month. The trouble is likely to come over the 
assignment of dates. Tho Detroit Association is likely 
to insist upon opening tho Circuit this year the same 
as usual, and they also wish to hold their meeting a 
week later than last year, which unless some one of 
tho tracks which oxpoct to be in line are frozen out 
will probably push the dates of tho Eastern members 
ahead, and it is not expected that they will stand for 
this. 



6 



[February 1, 190 



THE WEEKLY 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

F. W. KELLEY, Proprietor. 

Turf and Sporting Authority of the Pacific Coast. 

— orrics— 

36 QEARY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

P. O BOX 2300. 



Term*— One Year W3, Six Month* «1.75. Three Month* 81 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Money should be sent by postal order, draft or by registered letter 
addressed to F. W. Kem.ey, 36 Geary St., San Francisco. Cal. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's name and 
address, not necessarily for publication, but as a private guarantee 
of good faith. 

G. G. Tl Kill & CO., Agent*. Subscription and advertising. 

Salisbury Building, Melbourne, Australia 



San Francisco, Saturday, February i, 1902. 



Dates Claimed- -Season of 1902. 

CALIFOBNl v 

NAPA AG. SOCIETY, Napa August llth to liith 

DISTRICT No. #1. Woodland August 25th to aith 

STATE FAIR, Sacramento Septcmlier 1st to 13th 

DISTRICT No. 15, Bakersfleld Week prior to Los Angehs 



Stallions Advertised. 

TROTTING BRED. 

ALCYO 2:10 B. S. Krehe. San Jose 

HARONDALE 2:lli< Tom James. San Jose 

BONNIE DIRECT 2:05!i C. L. Griffiths Pleasantoc 

DOODLE JR F. M. Hammett, Watsonville 

DIABLO 2:<WJ< Wm. Murray, Woodland 

HART DOS W ELL Geo. A. Davis, Plcasanton 

Mi KINNEY 2:1 1 1 1 C. A. Durfee, San Jose 

MONDE SOL P Foley. Oakland 

NEIL W H. F. R. Vail, Santa Barbara 

NUTWOOD WILKES 2: 16H Martin Carter. Irvlngton 

PISTOL B. S. Krehe, San Jose 

liKY DIRECT 2:10 • Los Aogelcs. Geo. A. Davis, Pleasanton 

SIDNEY DILLON Frank Turner, Santa Rosa 

STAM B. 2:1IK Samuel Gamble, Pleasanton 

WILKES DIRECT 2:22', T. W. Barstow, San Jose 

YCU NG VENTURE p. Foley, Oakland 

ZOMBR0 2:ll Geo. T. Beckers, University P. O 

THOROUGHBREDS , 

OSSARY James McDonnell, Portola, San Mateo Co 

ST. CARLO James McDonnell, Portola, San Mateo Co 

HACKN EYN 

GREEN'S RUFUS The Baywood Stud, Sau Mateo 



\X7ASHINGTON JOCKEY CLUB which holds its 
» » meetings at the Bennings track, advertises 
several stakes to close Saturday, February 15th. 
Thore is added money in each and every instance none 
receiving less than $700, the highest being the Grand 
Consolation for two year olds, to which the sum of 
$2500 is added to the stakes. Entry blanks to these 
stakes can be had at this offica. 



A LIST OF STAKES to be run at the spring and 
autumn meetings of the Westchester Racing As- 
sociation at Morris Park will be found among the ad- 
vertisements in this issue. Entries for the same will 
close Saturday, February 15th. Entry blanks can be 
had at this office. For the spring meeting there are 
three stakes for two-yoar-olds, four for throe-year-olds 
and eight for three year-olds and upward, to all of 
which there is added money from $1200 up to $3700. A 
good list of steeple-chase and hurdle stakes is also 
advertised. The autumn stakes for two and three 
year olds are rich events, added money ranging from 
$2000 to $4000 in each stake. Remember, entries close 
February 15th. 



A GOOD CIRCUIT IS ASSURED to harness horse 
*\ owners in California this year. Already dates 
have been claimed by the principal district associations 
and announcement of purses will be made during the 
current month. Napa, Woodland, the State Fair and 
Bakersfield have claimed their dates and first class 
meetings wiil be given at each place. Other announce- 
ments will be made within a few day9. It is very 
probable that racing will begin during the latter part 
of July and continue until the latter part of October. 
There will be at the very least calculation twelve weeks 
of racing for purses from $300 to $1000. This is better 
than any other circuit west of the Rocky mountains 
will offer, and also better than the majority of circuits 
over East. The Grand Circuit offers many big purses 
it is true, but it takes speed of the very highest order 
and horses of iron constitution and gameness to win 
expenses over there. California's racing season is held 
in weather that cannot be excelled anywhere on earth. 
Horses are not prostrated by heat nor compelled to 
race in the mud. Good days and good tracks can be 
depended upon. If there is no bookmaking on harness 
races in California this year it will be the most success, 
ful saeson ever given here 



by the late J. B. Chase, proprietor of the Sonoma 
Stock Farm, who, probably more than any other 
prominent California breeder, established the founda- 
tion of his breeding theories on the lines of blood that 
could go a distance at extreme speed, and it will be 
noticed that the names of the famous four-railers, Katy 
Pease, Joe Daniels, Thad Stevens, Wildidle and other 
great long-distance performers, appear in the pedi- 
grees printed in the catalogue. To this blood he 
brought some of the best imported blood ever brought 
to California from England and Australia, and tho 
success that marked his efforts shows plairjly in the 
list of race winners every year. 

From the Chase paddocks have come Hidalgo, who 
won many memorable races both at the East and in 
California; Gilead, winner of the Thornton and other 
stakes, and conqueror of Rey El Santa Anita, Haw- 
thorne, etc.; DeBracey, who beat the best three year 
olds in the Middle West and California and ran a mile 
in 1:40; Monterey, one of the crack two year olds of 
1894, sired by Hidalgo: Marigold, who ran a mile in 
1:41, two miles in 3:30i and four miles in 7:201, the 
world's race record for mares; Centella, winner of 
twelve races and $9565; Kildare, winner of more than 
twenty races; Morven, a heavy winner on the Hat and 
over the sticks; Del Norte, who broke the Coast record 
at a mile and a sixteenth; Top Gallant, winner of four- 
teen races and "in the money" on filty-three occasions: 
Horatio, a good two and three year old: Phcebe Ann, 
a winner East and West: Mischief, a stake winner 
and producer; Glen Ellen, a winner and phenomenal 
producer; Mystery, who won three Derbys and took 
the measure of Geraldine and Acclaim: Manzanillo, 
won two races at Sacramento in 189H and defeated the 
famous Libertine; Rebecca, a winner and one of the 
most wonderful producers alive; Marian, her sister, a 
good winner and the mother of Sir John, Sykeston, 
Lady Marion, etc., and Modwena, a stake winner, and 
many others. Many others might be named, but 
these are sufficient to show that speed and also endur- 
ance of the highest quality have come from the 
Sonoma Stock Farm. 

Of the trotting stock little need be said. They were 
bred as a sido issue, and it was always tho idea of Mr. 
Chase to make good looks and size his principal aim in 
breeding horses of this description. The blood of such 
handsome horses as Saladin, Antevolo, Buccaneer and 
Secretary will be found in the pedigree of these horses ) 
and many fine individuals ire in the consignment. 

All the thoroughbreds of this consignment have 
been carefully registered with The Jockey Club, and 
as there are broodmares, yearlings, two, three and 
four year olds, breeders and turfmen should certainly 
be able to secure something to their liking in the lot 
to be offered, for they are members of the best known 
racing families in this part of the world. 



IT IS DUE BREEDERS, who mated their mares 
' last year, that the stallions patronized by them be 
nominated in the Special Stallion Stake offered by the 
State Agricultural Society. Unless a stallion is nom. 
inated, his foals of this year cannot be entered in this 
stake, and as it will bo one of the richest stakes ever 
given for three year old trotters and pacers there will 
be a general desire to name the foals in it. It is due 
breeders who patronize stallions that thoy have every 
opportunity offered them to place their colts in stakes. 



NEXT TUESDAY at 10 a. m. sharp the sale of the 
Sonoma Stock Farm horses will begin by order 
of tho court, at 1732 Market street, in this city. 

This is an absolute disposal sale of the horses owned 



Now that Lucile 2:07, Mr. Billing9' champion wagon 
mare of 1900, is going sound, and Chain Shot 2:0<U> 
Lord Derby 2:06] and The Monk 2:081 are in the hands 
of gentlemen who take an interest in the amateur 
game, general attention is again centered in the prob- 
ability of John A. McKerron 2:06;} holding the honors 
as the wagon champion. Reports from Walnut Hall 
Farm, McKerron's winter quarters, indicate him to be 
in superb condition. Messrs. Burgoyne and Benyon 
speak of him as having a monumental appetite this 
winter and an unequaled capacity for everything eat- 
able that comes his way. He has taken on a great 
amount of fiesh and is full of life and vim. McKerron 
and Lucile will have a marked advantage over the 
other contestants — should they contest — in receiving a 
special preparation to wagon, while Lord Derby, Chain 
Shot and The Monk will be asked to pass through the 
grueling process of the campaign with little opportu- 
nity to point them for the amateur wagon champion- 
ship. — Horse Review. 

Iran Alto 2:12} has been credited in many ol tho 
papers, this journal among them, with being the sire 
of the fastest four year old gelding of 1901, Thomas 
R. 2:15. The honor really belongs to McKinuey 2:11}, 
whose unsexed son El Milagro took a race record of 
2:14} last year. The writer with many others thought 
that El Milagro, who is out of the dam of Margaret 
Worth 2:15, was a stallion, but we learn that he is not, 
so the four year old gelding record of 1901 should be 
credited to him. 



Rate of Speed for One Eighth Mile. 

Trainers are beginning to work their trotters and 
pacers for the season of 1902, and the following table 
of reference will come handy to many. In it the rate 
of speed per eighth of a mile is shown for miles from 
three minutes down to two minutes, so that a glance 
at the figures shown at any part of the mile will give 
the rate of speed at which the horse was driven: 



78 


1/ 

74 


37 
78 


i7 

72 


57 
78 


3/ 

74 


77 
78 


ONI 
MlhC 


22 !% 




1 07 'A 




1 52)4 


2. 15 


2 37* 


3.CO 


2244 
**7* 


44 H 


1 07 Mi 


1 29 '2 


1.51 7 /$ 


2.14* 


2 36* 


2 59 


4 


A A 14 

*T*4 / Z 


1 06 »/ 


I 2Q 


1 51 •/ 


2 13/2 


2 35* 


2.58 


22 l A 
* * /a 


44 x i 


1 06)6 


I 28 >< 


1 soH 


2 I 2 }'i 


2-34/6 


2 57 


22 


44 


1 06 


1 28 


I 50 


2 1 2 


2.34 


2 56 


21% 


41* 

*TJ '*♦ 


1 °5% 


1 27 % 


I 49H 


2 11 M 


2 33 '6 


2 55 






1 05'x 


I 27 


I 4S?/ 


2 \O l / 2 


2 12 \i 


2 54 


21 %i 

* « /a 


4 \ M 


1 04 % 


I 2b'/ 2 


1 48'ii 


2 09 % 


2.31 * 


2 53 


2\Yz 


•43 


1 04^ 


1 26 


1 47/2 


2 09 


2 30 y 2 


2.52 


21)6 




1 04 )^ 


1 2$y 2 


1.467$ 


2 08^ 


2.297$ 


2.51 


21 * 


•42/2 


1 oi,}4 


I 2S 


1 46 V 


2.07 y 2 


2.28# 


2 5<> 


21 y% 


42* 


1 03 y% 


1.24^ 


1 45 X 


2 o6# 


2-27/<l 


2 49 


21 


.42 


1 03 


I 24 


1.45 


2.06 


2 27 


2 4S 


2o}i 


41* 


I 0278 


'•23K 


'•44/6 


2 05 % 


2.26;, 


2 47 


2o}£ 


.41 * 


'■°2* 


1.23 


'•43* 


2 04/2 


2 25 \i 


2 46 


20% 


•4-X 


I 01% 


I. 22 'A 


1 43 Vi 


2.03^ 


2 24/6 


2 45 


20/ 2 


•4' 


I 01* 


1.22 


1,42)4 


2.03 


2-23/^ 


2.44 


20% 


.40* 


\.o\yi 


\.2\Yz 


141/6 


2 02 \{ 


2 22H 


2 43 


20% 


40)2 


1 00 * 


1. 21 


'•4'* 


201<A 


221* 


2 42 


20)6 


•4oX 


1 ooj$ 


1 20^ 


1 40K 


2 00]{ 


2 20% 


2 4' 


20 


• 40 


1 00 


1 20 


1.40 


2 OO 


2.20 


2.40 


19/6 


39# 


•59* 


I.19* 


1 39*s 


'■59* 


2. I9X 


2 39 


'9* 


■39* 


.59* 


1 19 


' 3S74' 


' 58/2 


2.\8% 


238 


I9H 


39* 


.58'/$ 


i.t8X 


1.387s 


'■57* 


2.1776 


2-37 


19* 


•39 


.58 A 


1 IS 


i-37* 


i-57 


2.1672- 


2.36 


I9H 


■38* 


•587. 


1 ■ 7 H 


1.36% 


1 56* 


2.1576 


235 


'9* 


.38 'A 


57* 


1.17 


1.36* 


'•55* 


2.14* 


2-34 


'9* 


.38* 


577* 


I I6J4 


' 35# 


'•54* 


2.13/6 


2 33 


'9 


38 


■57 


1. 16 


1 35 


1-54 


2 '3 


232 


18J6 


• 37* 




'15* 


'■34/6 


'■53* 


2.12>6 


2 3< 




37 'A 


•56* 


115 


1 33* 


'•52* 


2-"* 


2.30 


r8)6 


•37* 


• 55# 


II4>2 


1-3378 


1-5'* 


2.I0J6 


2.29 


18% 


37 


■55'A 


1. 14 


1-32* 


1. 51 


2.09/4 


2.28 


i&ti 


.36* 


■5S'A 


II37J 


I -3 l H 


1-50* 


2.08 >6 


2.27 


18'X 




.54* 


113 


'•3 1 * 


1.49* 


2.077/ 


2.26 


18*4 




54# 


i.ia# 


1.3076 


'•48* 


2.0676 


2.25 


18 


.36 


• 54 


1. 12 


1.30 


1.48 


2.06 


2.24 


17H 


•35* 


53 # 


1. 11* 


1.2976 


'■47* 


2-05 'A 


2.23 


'7f4 


•35* 


•53* 


1. 11 


L28* 


1 46* 


2.0\% 


2.22 


'7)6 


•35* 


•52# 


1. 10.72 


1.28/6 


'■45* 


2.03)6 


2.21 


17* 


•35 


■52A 


1. 10 


12772 


'•45 


2.02)4 


2.20 


17)6 


•34* 


•527s 


1-09* 


1.2676 


'44* 


2.01)6 


2.19 


17* 


•34* 


5i* 


1.09 


1.26'A 


'•43* 


2.0Oj^ 


2.18 


17* 

/ /a 


• 34* 


51^1.08^ 


'•25/6 


'•42* 


'•59/6 


2.17 


17 


•34 


• 51 


1 08 


1.25 


1.42 


1.59 


2.16 


16% 


•33* 


50# 


1 07* 


1-24/4 


I-4I* 


1-58/6 


2.15 


16* 


•33* 


5oX:-i.o7 


123* 


MO* 


1-57* 


2.14 


'6)6 


•33* 


.49^; 1.06^ 


1.23/6 


'•39* 


1.5676 


2 '3 


16'A 


33 


.49W 1.06 


1.22>/ 2 


'•39 


'•55* 


2.12 


16H 


.32* 


49'A 


1 05)4 


L2I# 


1.38* 


1-54/6 


2. 1 1 


'6* 


.32* 


•48* 


1 05 


121* 


'•37* 


'•53* 


2.10 


iey s 


.$»%\ .48)61 '04* 


1. 20 76 


'•36* 


1-52)6 


2.09 


16 


•32 


.48 


1.04 


I.20 


'•36 


'•52 


2.08 


'5/6 


•3L* 


A7H 


1-93* 


'•19/6 


i-35* 


'-5I/6 


2.07 


'5* 


•3'* 


•47* 1-03 


I.I8* 


'•34* 


150* 


2.06 


'5* 


.31* 


.46?^ 1. 02^ 


1.1876 


'•33* 


1-49/6 


2.05 


>5* 


■3' 


• 467: 


1.02 


'•'7* 


I.33 


1.48* 


2.04 


tsH 


•30* 


.4678 


I.OI* 


i.i6# 


1-32* 


1-47/6 


2.03 




• 30* 


•45* 


1. 01 


1.16X 


1-3'* 


1.46* 


2.02 




.30* 


•45H 


I.OOj^ 


i.i5>6 


1 -30* 


1.45/4 


2.01 


15 


•30 


•45 


1. 00 


i.15 


1.30 


1.45 


2.00 



In none of the tables of the big money winners of 
the year which have been compiled has the name of 
The Abbot appeared. This is because his winnings 
were in special races or for exhibition miles. As a 
matter of fact, the ex-champion trotter won more 
money during the season of 1901 than any animal on 
the turf with the single exception of Cre9ceus 2:02} . 
At Brighton Beach he got $5000, notwithstanding the 
fact that be was distanced by Cresceus. At Readville. 
although again defeated by the chestnut stallion his 
winnings were $10,000. At Hartford he got M000, at 
Terro Haute $500 and at Lexington $5000 forfeit 
money because of Boralma's non-appearance, owing to 
sickness. This makes $21,500 which he won for his 
owner without winning a race. Mr. Scannel thinks 
that the gelding will prove a good investment. He is 
but eight years old and is in the best of condition this 
winter. 



Monochrome is the name which John Rowen of 
Emeryville has selected to have his four year old stal- 
lion registered under. Monochrome, as his name sig- 
nifies, is of solid color and 19 a beautiful bay by Mc- 
Kinney 2:11} out of Hattie, the dam of Monterey 2:09} 
and Montana 2:16. He stands 16.1 and has never been 
worked for speed on account of his size, but is a very- 
fast coit. He will make a limited season at Stockton 
this year at $30. 



February 1, 1902] 



7 



North Pacific Fair Circuit. 

The managers of fair associations in Oregon, Wash- 
ington, British Columbia and Idaho are very much 
alive and have already agreed upon dates for a circuit 
this year. Representatives from many of the associa- 
tions met at Seattle, January 15th, as follows: 

J. A. Fullerton and Robert Leighton representing 
Vancouver Jockey Club, Vancouver, B. C. : T. B. Gunn 
and A. J. Splawn, Washington State Fair, North Ya- 
kima; Chris Simpson, Irvington track, Portland; W. 
H. Wehrung and M. D. Wisdom, Oregon State Fair, 
Salem; J. B. Stetson. Idaho Inter-Moun'ain Pair. 
Boise; A. T. Van De Vanter, King County Fair, Se- 
attle; R. L. Kline, Whatcom County Agricultural 
Assn., Whatcom; Chas. D. Jefferies, Spokane Inter- 
State Fair, Spokane: W. H. Keary, Provincial Fair. 
New Westminster, B. C; Dan Currie and T. F. Oliver- 
Snohomish County Agricultural Association, Everett, 
Wash.; C. W. Mounts, Lewiston, Idaho, and Bill Nye* 
of Chilliwack, B. C. 

J. A. Fullerton was chosen chairman of the meeting 
and M. D. Wisdom, secretary. Upon motion the 
chair appointed C. D. Jefferies, R. L. Kline and T. F. 
Oliver a committee on dates for a spring racing circuit. 
The committee reported as follows and the report was 
adopted: 

Seattle Aug. 18 to 28 

Vancouver, B. C Aug. 30 to Sept. 1 

Whatcom Sept. 2 to 6 

Everett Sept. 8 to 13 

Salem Sept. 1") to 20 

Portland Sept. 22 to 27 

North Yakima Sept. 29 to Oct. 4 

Spokane Oct. 6 to 14 

Lewiston Oct. 15 to 18 

Boise Oct. 20 to 25 

The matter of offering early closing events was 
taken up and thoroughly discussed. It was practically 
decided that the following named associations would 
offer at least two $1000 early closing stakes for harness 
events, and some of them will add a liberal stake for 
runners: 

Seattle— A stake for 2:30 trotters and 2:16 pacers. 

Salem— For 2:25 trotters and 2:18 pacers. 

North Yakima— For 2:4C trotters and 2:20 pacers. 

Spokane— For 2:20 trotters and 2:25 pacers. 

Boise— For 2:23 trotters and 2:28 pacers. 

The other associations will also give early closing 
stakes of smaller amounts. 

A resolution was passed that in the sense of the 
meeting expert judges be employed, and the names of 
Chas. D. Jeffries and Robert Leighton were recom- 
mended as competent men. 

A Board of Appeals, to consist of J. A. Fullerton, 
M. D. Wisdom, A. T. Van De Vanter, T. B. Gunr., C. 
D. Jeffries and J. B. Stetson, was chosen, and by this 
Board all disputes, etc., arising in races will be settled. 

Many stallion owners are increasing the fees for the 
services of their horses this year. In this connection 
Palmer Clark says: It will beremembereu that in the 
days of the boom period nothing so thoroughly took 
the heart out of an enthusiastic breeder as when ho 
had to sell a two year old colt or filly for much less 
than he had paid for the stallion services— a condition 
that was bound to, in time, and did, result disastrously 
to the breeding interests. 

I beileve that the iargest fee now charged for the 
public service of any stallion is that of the champion 
trotter Cresceus, and which is placed at $300, a figure 
that would seem about fair considering his supreme 
position. Axtell 2:12, who once commanded a service 
fee of $1000, is now standing at $100; Chimes, the sire 
of The Abbot 2:03}, is standing at $100. while Sphinx, 
styled the leading son of Electioneer, is offered at $05; 
Red Heart 2:19, sire of Chainshot 2:06£, Red Seal 2:10, 
etc., is standing at the low figure of $30; Highwood 
2:21}, sire of several in 2:10, the latter's former stable 
companion, commands $50. All these figures are 
within the bounds of reason, and some exceedingly 
low, considering the caliber of the horses, but while 
these conditions obtain there is much to encourage 
the great army of lay breeders, so to Speak, who 
do not own a stallion of their own, as it puts the very 
best within the reach of all. The danger, howoyer, 
lies in the rapidly returning prosperous conditions 
which have a tendency to a return of the fictitious 
values placed on horses and their earning capacity, 
which, persisted in, ultimately brings the collapse 
that follows as a consequonce. 

Never before in the history of the trotting horse 
business have values been on so legitimate a basis as 
present, and it is to be hoped that breeders will exer- 
cise sufficient judgment to maintain a status of afTairs 
the very legitimacy of which will aitraot the surplus 
capital resulting from a period of continued business 
prosperity. 

It is understood that William G. LayDg, the owner 
of the undefeated pacer, Sir Albert S. 2:08ij, is about 
to close negotiations with a prominent Eastern horse- 
man to lease this horse to race on the Grand Eastern 
Circuit. 



Nutwood Wilkes 2:16 1-2. 



New laurels are earned every year by Nutwood 
Wilkes 2:16J, the premier stallion of the Nutwood 
Stock Farm at Irvington, Alameda county, in this 
State, fn 1901, his son John A. McKerron, that took 
a three year old record of 2:12| in 1898, and reduced it 
to 2:10 in 1900. trotted to a wagon record of 2:08J 
driven by his owner, Mr. H. K. Devereux of Cleveland, 
an amateur. For two years in succession John A. Mc- 
Kerron was returned the winner of the Interstate Cup 
for wagon trotters, and should he win the contest 
again this year the cup will become the permanent 
property of the Cleveland Driving Club. This cup 
has been to amateur horsemon what the America's 
cup is to yachtsmen, and the handsome son of Nut- 
wood Wilkes has had to meet the best wagon trotters 
of the country in both contests. That ho has won his 
races in straight heats and outclassed all the hors?s 
contending is a tribute to California as a breeding 
state and to Nutwood Wilkes as a sire of extreme 
speed and race horse qualities. 

There is no horse in Amorica to-day that stands a 
better chance to succeed to the champion sire crown 
than this son of Guy Wilkes and Lida W. by the great 
Nutwood. He is a comparatively young horse, having 
been foaled in 1888, and taken his record in 189G- 
Every year he produces a sensational trotter and the 
names of Who Is It 2:12 the ex-champion three year 
old gelding, Bob Ingersoll 2:14J. one of the largest 
money winners of 1900, Stanton Wilkes, a phenomen- 
ally fast pacer, as well as John A. McKerron. the 
champion stallion to wagon are known wherever har- 
ness horses are read about. One of tho attractive fea- 
tures of Nutwood Wilkes is his extreme beauty, ho 
being one of the handsomest stallions over foaled, and 
as he imparts this quality to his get his services are 
much sought after by those astute breeders who 
realize the fact that speed without good looks will not 
bring the highest figures when horses are placed in 
the salesring. 

Having size, style, handsome proportions, speed and 
the ability to reproduce them, Nutwood Wilkes, if his 
pedigree is satisfactory, has no superiors, and in this 
latter qualification he is pre-eminent. Sired by Guy 
Wilkes, one of the greatest of the great sons of the im- 
mortal George Wilkes, he gets from his sire the best 
strains of the Wilkes blood. The dam of Guy Wilkes 
was the great broodmare, Lady Bunker who, was by 
Mambrino Patchen. Now of the sons of Geo Wilkes that 
have produced 100 standard performers Alcantara 
sire of 149. Baron Wilkes sire of 100, Gambetta Wilkes 
sire of 101, and Simmons sire of 106 were out of Mam- 
brino Patchen mares, while Onward sire of nine in 
2:10 and of 158 in 2:30, and Red Wilkes sire of 165 in 
2:30, were out of mares by Mambrino Chief 11, the sire 
of Mambrino Patchen. Is any further proof needed 
that this Geo. Wilkes-Mambrino Chief cross is ono 
of the greatest in the stud book. 

Having such blood on his sire's side, lot us look at 
the dam's side of the house. The mare that produced 
Nutwood Wilkes was Lida W. 2:18} (dam also of the 
producing sire Direct line 2:29) by Nutwood. A well 
known turf writer in speaking of a Nutwood mare 
once said: ' If she is by Nutwood that is enough; she 
would be all right if she was out of a barrel." Nut- 
wood is the greatest of all sires. Ho has 166 in tho 2:30 
list and his daughters hnye produced 186. Nutwood 
mares have 35 in the exclusive 2:15 list, more by far 
than tho daughters of any other stallion. Among 
these fast ones are Arion 2:07ij, tho world's champion 
two year-old; Fred Kohl 2:07i|, Ethel Downs 2:10, Pre- 
cision 2:10}, Nemoline 2:111, Ned Thorne 2:11} and 
other trotters, as well as the following among the 
pacers: Eyelet 2.06J, Bellwood A. 2:07J, Sunland 
Belle 2:081, Nydia Wilkes 2:09}, Barondale 2:11} and 
many others. 

The second dam of Nutwood Wilkes was by Geo. M. 
Patchen Jr. 2:27, one of the old-time race horses of 
California whose blood is found in such fast ones as 
Anaconda 2:013, and many more, and whose sire, Geo. 
M. Patchen 2:23, was tho champion stallion of his day. 

The third dam of Nutwood Wilkes was the mare 
Rebel Daughter, that was a daughter of tho Mambrino 
Patchen of the Pacific Coast, Williamson's Belmont- 
Rebel Daughter was a thoroughbred and won at a mile 
in her racing days. Williamson's Belmont sired Ven- 
ture 2:27}, the first thoroughbred horso to take a 
trotting record, and Venture sired tho dam of the 
champion stallion Directum 2:05} and also the dam of 
Cupid 2:18, sire of Venus II. 2:11}, and Cupid's full 
brother Sidney Dillon, sire of Dolly Dillon 2:07. 

There is not a pedigree that shows more speed lines 
than that of Nutwood Wilkos. It is right up in the 
most fashionable, up-to-date families and that is where 
breeders must look for success. Modern methods 
compel people who want tho best to breed to tho bost 
of tried and proven sires. Nutwood Wilkes has earned 
a place in the very front rank of the best spetd sires 
of America. 



Zombro at Los Angeles. 

The book of Zombro 2:11 is filling very rapidly at 
Los Angeles, where this horse is now located until 
June 1st, and the colts and fillies by him are attract- 
ing so much attention that the probabilities are that 
Mr. Bickers will he compelled to turn mares away. 

This week Jos. Desmond, of Los Angeles, sold his 
Zombro filly Italia 2:2.'U, winner of last year's Occident 
Stake, to Mr J. Murray, of Cleveland, Ohio, for W>00. 
Italia will remain in Walter Million's care until May 
1st, when she will be shipped to Cleveland and placed 
in the care of Chas. Tanner, one of tho leading train- 
ers and horsemen of America. If she has no accidents 
and stands tho climate she will he entered in the 
M. \- M. 

Willard Stimson, of Los Angeles, sold this week to 
John Bradbury, of the same place, tho Zombro colt 
Lord Kitchener, trial 2:2(U, for $1000 in cash. Lord 
Kitchener's dam is Sarah Benton by Albion, second 
dam by Inca. The colt is in Walter Maben's string 
and will be put in training. 

The cream of all the Zombro's in Los Angeles, it is 
said, belongs to Col. E. L. Mayberry. Sho is out of 
Lady Woolsey by Woolsoy, full brother to Sunol, 
She showed a quarter last summer in 32 seconds with 
sixty days' work and is now in P. W. Hodges' string 
Col. Mayberry says it will take $5000 to buy her. 

Tho prices offered for Zombro youngsters is the 
proof of the horse's popularity and breeders are tak- 
ing notes accordingly. 

Many a well bred trotter is sent into the sale ring 
and sold before his or her true worth is suspected and 
in manj instances the breeder would pay a good price 
to recover some of these rejected ones. The stallion 
The Peer, sire of last season's good trotter, Dave 
Hughes 2:15J, was early in life docked and is some, 
where doing the hackney act. He was sired by Mam- 
brino King, dam by Nutwood, and Dave Hughes is ono 
of the very few foals he sired before he had his tail cut 
off, as a part of his preparation to make a high stepper 
of him. Another one that was sent to the sale ring 
from Village Farm, before it was suspected that she 
would become very valuablo some day, was Court 
Lady, an own sister to the now famous Lord Derby 
2:064. She was sold as a carriage mare and she is 
doubtless engaged in pulling someone's carriage, 
although all trace of her whereabouts has been lost. 
Lots of men would give a big price for her to use as a 
broodmare, but the chances are that none of those 
who would like to own her will be able to find her. — 
Horse World. 

The stupendous magnitude of tho business done at 
the Union Stock Yards, Chicago, is shown by last 
year's official reports, which gave for tho twelve 
months a total of 16,200,000 head of livo stock at cash 
sales amounting to $200,000,000. The horse market 
was established in 1866, and that year a total of 1553 
horses were received. An idea can be formed of how 
this branch of tho business has grown, by the fact that 
on May twenty-fifth last, more horses were received 
on that one day than were received the entiro first 
year. The total for 1901 was 109,390 horses and mulesi 
tho sales amounting to $13,128,000. The largest num- 
ber for one day was 1667, and the largest number for 
one month 13,2*8, tho month of March. 



Jackson's Napa Soda untangles the feet. 



hiorse Owners 

Look to your interests and use 
the safest, speedw.1 and most 
positive cure for ailments of 
your horses, tot which an ex- 
ternal remedy can be used, viz 

GOMBAILT'S 

CAUSTIC BALSAM 

Piopfttoil exclusively 
liv .1 I <■ Hi. ex- 

\Vtei tuary Surgeon to 
Hit* Kieni'h (.nvnnment 




SUPFRSFDrS M L CAIJURYOR FIRING. 

Impmsihlf I" pr'i'lttrr null srar or hUmish. 
The *nfr*t be*t llll-lc 1 i-.-i u— .1 Take* tho 
place of all liniment* Tor Rllld or severe action. 
Remove* nil llniichc-<oi lilctni<.hc* from llornex 
or Cattle. 

Kverv I. ..111.- .1 4 in,. tie Ituloiim Mihl N 
W111 1 iinli .l |.i k'l- •■ in 1 -In. 1 I '1 let » I tmO 

per bottle. Hohl hv »lruKgl-.t*, or *ent by e*- 
|irc«*. charge* paid, with (nil direction* for It* 
ll*e. Send fur ilc-i rlpll- ciicnlain. testimo- 
nial*, etc. AOONM 

THE UWRRNCEWIUIAHS C0H.PANY, Cleteltnd, Obio 



8 



©its gve&vv axib Qvovteman 




ROD, GUN AND KENNEL. 



Conducted by J. X. I>e WITT. 



Coming Events. 



Itench Shows. 

Feb 4 5, 6-Rhode Island Kennel Club. Annual bench show 
Providence, R. L George D. Miller, Secretary. 

Feb. It, 12 13, 14-Westminstor Kennel Club. James Mortimer 
Superintendent, New York City. 

Feb 2ft-March l-Duquesne Kennel Club of Western Pennsyl 
-ania. F. S. Stedman, Secretary, Pittsburg, Pa. 

Field Trials. 

Jan 20— United States Field Trial Club. Annual trials. 
Junction, Tenn. W. S. Stafford. Secretary, Trenton, Tenn 

Feb. 3-Alabama Field Trial Club. Fifth annual trials, 
son, Ala T. H. Spencer, Seoretary-treasurer. 

Feby. 8-Continental Field Trial Club. Annual trials. 
Junction. Tenn 



Grand 



Madl- 



Grand 

rheo. Sturgls, Secretary, Greenfield Hill, Conn. 



KENNEL HYGIENE. 

A popul r fallacy exists that feeding of milk to 
puppies produces in them worms. Like all other 
forms of animal life, intestinal worms can only come 
into existence from pre-existing parents, and in their 
case, through the medium of eggs developed from other 
worms. Therefore, the only way the administration 
of milk could cause the presence in the intestines of 
these parasites would be by their eggs getting into the 
milk between the time it is drawn from the cow and 
imbibed by the puppy, as worms do not inhabit the 
milk glands. But this is hardly likely, as raiik above 
all articles of diet is preserved as clean and pure as 
possible nowadays. 

What really happens is as follows: Eggs of worms 
are probably widespread over the ground. Puppies 
are all the time getting matter from the surface of the 
ground into their mouths, and at the same time 
swallow some of the eggs lying about. 

No doubt milk is "n ex3ellent nutritive material for 
worms as well as for their host, and in this manner 
milk will cause worms already existing in the bowels 
to rapidly thrive and grow. But this is no argument 
against the use of milk, as by the time puppies are 
through taking it they should be treated to bring 
about the expulsion of the parasites. 



Many text books and kennel publications ad vise that 
bones should be given "in order that the dog may 
keep his teeth clean.' - 

This theory io contradicted by Dr. Cecil French, a 
well known Eastern authority on veterinary matters, 
who believes that bones are not only useless, but fre- 
quently a menace to the dog's safety, claiming that in 
an extended practice among ailing dogs he has had 
numerous opportunities of observing the ill effects of 
a diet of bone. How a dog can clean hi9 teeth by 
gnawing a bone is somewhat beyond comprehension. 
The Doctor argues, that which constitutes uncleanli- 
ness of a dog's teeth is the accumulation of tartar 
owing to the derangement in the salivary secretion and 
small particles of food. This matter is invariably- 
found deposited in between, at the posterior surfaces 
and around the necks of the teeth, where any rubbing 
process of bone against the tooth is impossible. If 
bones were such excellent tooth-cleaners it is presum- 
able that poor persons unable to afford the luxury of 
tooth brushes would avail themselves of such inexpen- 
sive substitutes. 

On theother hand, bones are splendid tooth wearers. 
One need only look at the teeth of some dog that has 
habitually gnawed bones to be convinced that these 
organs would have been in a better state of preserva- 
tion had he not so used them. 

But the ill effects do not stop at this. Splintered 
bones frequently wound the walls of the stomach and 
set up violent gastric inflammation which may ter- 
minate fatally. 

Sharp bones — especially those of chickens — it will 
be remembered the death of Glen wood Kennels' smooth 
coat bitch Belline, last year, was caused by a chicken 
bone — often become lodged in the throat or wedged in 
the teeth, from which positions they are removed with 
difficulty. Dogs have been dostroyed by ignorant 
policemen and others, the poor animals were supposed 
to be suffering from rabies, when they were making 
frant ; c attempts to dislodge bones from their jaws. Old 
dogs commonly suffer from impaction of the rectum, 
so that only operatives measures will effect the removal 
of the obstructions. These are found to consist largely 
of bone grit that has failed to become dissolved or 
digested in the stomach and on reaching the rectum 
packs into a rock-like mess. 



Size in the Fox Terrier. 



Signs are not wanting that there is likely in the 
near future to be a change in the size of the fox terrier. 
Upholders of the popular variety as a working dog 
have for years decried the modern craze for a big dog 
on the scoro that it was unsuited for the purpose that 
it was at one time required for. In the kennei terrier 
"of old, from which the modern dog has undoubtedly 
descended, we had a les9 showy animal, but one that 
was better calculated to perform the allotted duties 
than the present day type. True, customs have 
changed somewhat since it was the fashion for a fox 
terrier to be included with the pack of foxhounds, to 
oust, if nocessarv, Reynard from his underground re- 
treat. Now the services of the fox terrier are prac- 



tically discarded, and the fox, on go : ng to earth, is 
allowed to remain. 

For all that, the fox terrier should not be allowed to 
degenerate into a purely fancy breed, and though 
straight legs and clean fronts are very nice to look 
upon, yet they are not everything in a breed that is 
intended to be a worker. The old Parson Jack Bus- 
sell strain of terrier was— and looked— a working one, 
yet it has been practically allowed to die out. There 
are but very few (we only know two) fanciers that 
hold any of the hunting parson's strain of fox terriers. 

The judging at the fox terriers' own show, at Chel- 
tenham, last November, was a revelation to upholders 
of the big type of dog, and the judge's work was very 
freely criticised. There the awards went to the 
smaller type of dog. However, fashion in dogs has 
ever been fickle, and it now remains to be seen whether 
a complete return to the old love — namely, an alto- 
gether lees leggy type of dog will result. It will be a 
trifle hard upon those who have founded kennels upon 
the type hitherto most favored, and have been taught 
to regard it as the correct one, to find themselves 
suddenly shut out of the competitions by reason of the 
large size of their dogs. Yet that is exactly what will 
occur should the fiat go forth that the maximum 
weight must be lowered considerably. — "f'on/<?o)i" in 
Exchange and Mart. 

Gabilan Kennels 



Is the name of an institution in Hollister that is 
successfully managed by Mrs. Tho9. Murphy, who 
knows more about dogs in a minute than the average 
man learns in a lifetime. From childhood Mrs. Murphy 
has taken an interest in canines, and beginning on a 
small scale has worked the business up until she has 
become an established authority on stock, pedigree, 
etc. The kennels are situated upon the corner of East 
and Seventh streets. The star of the kennels is Dan- 
stone's Pride, a two year old English Setter, by Count 
Dan9tone out of Fairland (Jueen, imported from the 
East at a cost of $200. This dog has already earned 
its cost in stud fees. Two handsome Scotch Collies are 
boarded for San Francisco fanciers. A Pointer bitch 
with a litter of puppies, the property of the editor 
of the Brkedkr and Sportsman', are also on board. 
The puppies are bred on Glenbeigh-Rip Rap blood 
lines and are a constant source of attraction to our 
local sportsmen. A fine breeding of Fox Terriers has 
been developed at the Gabilan Kennels. They are not 
handsome animals, but they are great ratters. There 
are also Skye Terriers and Cocker Spaniels in the ken- 
nels. All the dogs are w. 11 fed and kept in healthy 
condition. In March an importation of Gordon Set- 
ters will arrive from the East, most of which have 
been bargained for by sportsmen. A visit to the ken- 
nels is full of interest — San Benito Advance. 

DOINGS IN D0GD0M. 



Joe Cummings' Boy by Ch. Joe Cummings ex Grace 
Grady was recently sold by Mr. S. Christianson to Mr. 
J. A. Chanslor, of Los Angeles. Mr. Christianson also 
sold to a visiting New Jersey sportsman a promising 
Settor puppy by Joe Cummings' Boy ex Kitty R. 



Mr. W. C. Ralston's recent purchase, a promising 
young English Setter, Bowling Green, whelped August 
12, 1900, by Count Danstone out of Phil Wand's Flora 
W., has gon6 the way of all good canines. The young 
Setter died at Kenwood last week, much to the regret 
of his owner. 

Five more Newfoundland dogs have been Oought by 
the prefect of police of Paris to re-enforce the two 
already possessed as auxiliaries to the river police 
brigade. The mission of the dogs is to save persons 
from drowning and also to help the police discover 
malefactors concealed in the numerous hiding places 
on the quays. Experiments show that the dogs, if 
properly trained and looked after, can be very useful. 



In the selection of Mr. T. J. A. Tiedemann as a mem- 
ber of the executive committee, the Pacific Coast Field 
Trials Club is to be congratulated in obtaining the ex- 
perienced services of a thorough sportsman and of 
having among its list of members a field trial pro- 
moter and enthusiastic lover of high class dogs whose 
prestige would be an acceptable feature to any sports- 
men's club. Mr. Tiedemann was the moving spirit in 
the formation of the Pacific Northwest Field Trial Club 
and is the owner of that handsome and consistent per- 
former Northern Huntress, one of the few winning 
Setters at the recent Santa Maria trials. 



As was intimated in last week's issue of this journal, 
Mr. L. A. Klein has been appointed by the Betich Show 
committee to act as Superintendent of the spring dog 
show of the San Francisco Kennel Club. Mr. Klein 
has the advantage of a ripe experience not only in con- 
nection with bench shows but in general kennel affairs 
and is a gentleman of good executive abilities. These 
necessary attributes will no doubt tend to a smooth and 
easy settlement of the thousand and one preliminary 
details that are essential in making a dog show satis- 
factory to the club, exhibitors and the general public. 

The club will open to-day an office at 138 Mont- 
gomery street, Occidental Hotel building, to where all 
communications should be addressed. Mr. Klein will 
assume complete direction of the coming bench show. 



BARKS. 

In moving into town as well as moving out don't 
forget your pets. 

A large, wide ear in a Great Dane is a defect, but not 
a disqualification. 

The legs of a Scotch Terrier should be straight, or 
as near straight as possible. 



You must not expect to breed all winners, even 
though you pair together champions. 



There is not an insurance company that accepts 
policies on dogs except at a prohibitive'rate. 



The eyes of old English Sheepdogs vary with the 
color of the dog. In a pigeon-blue dog a wall, or 
China, eye is correct. 

The "feather" of any dog is the long hair which 
grows at the back of the fore and hind legs and along 
the body underneath. 



You ought alwa-s keep your dogs and cats nights 
where they will not disturb the sleep of your neighbors 
and so come in danger of being poisoned. 



You ought always to kill a wounded bird or other 
animal as soon as you can. All suffering of any creature, 
just before it dies, poisons the meat. 



You should not harbor poor breeding stock. A good 
specimen eats no more than a bad one, and is more 
likely to produce what you are seeking. 



The ears, as a rule, grow with tho head, but in the 
case of a Spaniel they grow feathering after the ear 
proper and head are full grown, and drop a little al90, 
making them longer. 

Measurements in any dog are of very little guide to 
its merits, and less so in puppies, which may be one 
thing at four months old and something entirely differ- 
ent at nine months old. 



It is not right to think any sort of food good enough 
for your stock If you want them to thrive give them 
the best food procurable, and plenty of it. You will 
get best results from this method of treating them. 

You should not be above taking a bit of advice from 
old nan Is. If you desire to succeed in your hobby you 
will "be able to uso all the wrinkles you can pick up 
when mixing with those who spent many years in 
learning what they know. 



It is quite customary for bitches to secrete milk in 
the glandular organs at the time they would be duo to 
whelp, though never served by a dog, or when served 
and miss proving in whelp, just the same. 



The Bedlington Terrier is a very hardy variety. Its 
chief points are narrow skull, powerful jaw. neck 
rather long, narrow chest, arched loin, good top knot 
and small eye. Average weight, dogs, 2.') to 24 pounds; 
bitches, 20 to 22 pounds, when full grown. 



Striped Bass Club Prize Winners. 

At the banquet of the San Francisco Striped Bass 
Club last week ten prizes were distributed to the ten 
club members who caught during the past season the 
ten largest striped bass. 

The prizes awarded were all useful and beautiful 
articles dear to the angler's heart and doubly valuable 
to the lucky fisherman by reason of the competition 
which was necessary for acquiring a club trophy. 

G. Luttrell led the chosen ten with the record of a 
sixteen pound fish and was presented with the Ripley 
"high hook" gold medal, to be worn by the club 
champion, and the regular first prize, a fine split bam- 
boo rod. President Charles Breidenstein annexed 
second honors, a split bamboo fishing rod. Mr. Breid- 
enstein had the honor during two previous seasons of 
wearing the high hook medal for the largest fish caught 
by a member during the two years, bass weighing 
nine and sixteen pounds respectively. 

James S. Turner won third prize, a Vom Hoffe reel. 
James Lynch took fourth prize, a tackle-box. Fifth 
prize was a fishing creel, won by Will S. Turner. Nat 
Meade's prize, the sixth, was also a Yom Hoffe reel. 
A corduroy coat and vest, the seventh prize, went to 
Senator Sid Hall. W. Hilliegass won a fine gaff, the 
eighth prize. A canvas suit, the ninth prize, went to 
James Watt. The ten award, or mysterious prize, was 
won by Wm. Ashcroft. 

Among those present at the dinner, which was en- 
livened by speeches, toasts, songs and anecdotes, were: 
Charles Breidenstein, Chairman. Walter D. Mansfield, 
President of the San Francisco Fly-Casting Club, Geo. 
W. Mitchell, J. S. Turner, Chas. H. Kewell, W. S. 
Turner, Nat Mead, Bert Spring, W. H. L. Miller, 
Wm. Ashcroft, G. Luttrell, Jas. Lynch, Jas. Watt, 
W. Hilliegass, F. E. Daverkosen, Chas. Huyck, C. B. 
Hollywood, Elmer Rodekopf, George Vance, W. Wil- 
son, Clarence Ashland, C. Colgan, A. C. Cunningham, 
W. D. Nicholson, J. M. Thompson and others. 

Advices from J. F. Orr on Wednesday report Rus- 
sian river in fine condition for steelhead angling for 
the two days remaining of the open season. Close 
season commences to-day and will be in force until 
April 1st. 

Jackson's Napa Soda is so'*? I "• > very citv, town and 
hamlet in the State. 



FebruakyJI, 1902J 



9 



Fishing at The Rocks. 



[J. MAYNE BALTIMORE..! 

Santa Catalina Island and many other points along 
the coast of Southern California afford magnificent 
marine fishing. 

With the exception of salmon fishing along the 
lower Columbia, Puget Sound and the Fraser river in 
British Columbia, there are no fishing grounds like 
those to be found between the bay of San Francisco 
and the Mexican boundary line. 

While that is true in a general sense, yet there are 
many points along the coast of Oregon and Washing- 
ton where a great deal of sport and excitement may 
be experienced. 

Of course, there are no big fish to be captured like 
the tuna, barracuda, jewfish, yellowtail, etc., yet there 
are many small fellows that may be '"snagged" with 
the proper lure. Prominent among these "small fry" 
man be mentioned tomcod, rockcod, flounder (or sole) 
and porgies. 

One of the favorite summer resorts along the Wash- 
ington coast is found just north of the mouth of the 
Columbia river. It is known as North Beach. A few 
miles beyond the little fishing town of Ilwaco, the 
beach begins and extends clear up to the mouth of 
Shoalwater bay, a distance of some 10 miles. Opposite 
the mouth of the bay named, stands the little hamlet 
of Oysterville, so famous for its delicious bivalves. 

From McKenzie's Head clear north to Oysterville is 
a sort of straggling village. It is along this broad 
strip of wet, glistening beach that so many thousands 
of "seasiders" resort during the long sweltering days 
of July and August. 

Down near McKenzie's Head, which is less than two 
miles north of where the waters of the Columbia river 
and those of the Pacific Ocean meet, the high and bold 
headland shut6 abruptly down upon the sea. At that 
point there is no beach. The ocean beats with great 
and constant fury against eternal and immovable rock 
abutment*. But the erosions wrought by the tireless 
action of the waves are very marked. 

Near this place are located "The Rocks." Here is 
where capital ocean fishing is to be found. There are 
a number of high, ragged rocks standing not far from 
uhe mainland. Some of these rocks are quite large, 
and, at extreme low tide, rise fifteen or twenty feet 
above the ocean's surface. During very high tide the 
crests of some of these rocks are almost or entirely 
submerged. 

When the tide is very low, the most of the rocks 
may be reached, though not dry shod. One must 
wade nearly half leg deep to gain these points. 

All around these rocks splendid fishing is to be found. 
At the proper time, and under favorable circumstances, 
the finny denizens may be pulled out almost as rapidly 
as the book can be cast. It is rare sport and great 
strings are captured daily. 

During the seaside season "The Rocks" are a favorite 
point of rendezvous. For hours every day they are 
covered with anglers — men, women and even children. 
The latter are carried in through the water, but, gen- 
erally, the ladies are left to shift for themselves. 
Though wading several feet deep in cold sea water is 
quite a trying ordeal for ladies at first, they soon be- 
come accustomed to the excitement and enjoy the 
sport. 

At that point the supply of fish seems literally ex- 
haustless. How many thousands are caught every 
season is impossible to estimate; yet, as the years come 
and go, they appear as numerous as ever. These fish 
are all very palatable when properly cooked and are 
highly relished by those who are temporarily roughing 
it, by the sad sea wave. 

But still there is a time to fish down at "TheRocks," 
and there is a time to desist. Low tide is the time to 
angle. When the glittering waters commence crawl- 
ing toward the tawny shore, then is the time to call a 
halt, pick up your string of fish (if you are lucky 
enough to have any), take your rod and line and move 
toward the mainland. 

To remain on these slippery rocks during high tide 
is exceeding perilous. The waves dash with great 
force and fury against and upon the rocks. They are 
rarely covered, except at flood-tide; but the bitter 
spray is carried clear over the tops in blinding showers. 

Some rash and fool-hardy persons have braved the 
danger and remained on the rocks during the high 
tide. However, they have been drenched to the skin 
and chilled to the very marrow; besides incurring the 
peril of being swept from their slippery, treacherous 
footing and carried off by the hungry sea. Danger 
seems to add a zest to the fascination of surf fishing. 
"The Rock9" have had their tragedies. Several ad- 
venturous persons have lost there lives there. They 
persist in remaining too long, and when attempting to 
reach the land, were borne away by the engulfing surf 
and perished. In some instances the bodies have never 
been recovered from the sullen waters. 

Angling for fish is not the only sport the average 
seasider has. Catching flounders, sprawling crabs and 
digging for the nimble and delusive clam, affords great 
diversion to the fun-loving multitudes. 

Nimrods are not entirely without an "occupation." 
Back from the beach game birds may be bagged in 
the proper season. Still further back are deer; while 
in the mountains and forests are found black and 
brown bear, and the sly and wary cougar. 

The little village of Ilwaco, which is located on the 
eastern shores of Baker's Bay, presents a scene of great 
activity during fishing season. Salmon fishing begins 
in March and ends in August. In the course of the 
season almost countless numbers of the royal salmon 
are captured and canned. 

During the fishing hours, hundreds of little boats 
may be seen skinning around Bakers' Bay, above 
and below Sand Island, and even down near the white 



line of breakers which mark the famous "Columbia 
River Bar.'' It is a most -interesting feature of the 
great misty, watery reaches— the mauv scores of boats 
constituting tho "salmon fleet." 

In and around Ilwaco and Fort Canby, are also good 
fishing grounds for porgies, tomcod, rockcod and 
flounders. 

One of the pleasantest and most exciting kinds of 
sea fishing is casting into tho surf. Many kinds of 
fish on the coast are caught in this way, and afford 
infinite sport, a big fish being by no means easy to 
handle in heavy water. There was a time when tho 
angling fraternity looked with amusement on tho man 
who waded into the surf and cast his bait into the sea, 
That amusement has now died out, and surf-casting is 
a favorite method of lishing with very many successful 
anglers. Thoro is a freedom about this style of fishing 
that recomme nds it very strongly to many people. It 
is far different to holding a hand-line in a boat and 
hauling in anything that happens to bite and take the 
hook. Surf-casting brings into play the full skill of 
the angler when a heavy fish is hooked, and a fish of 
ten or twelve pounds is not so uncommon a catch. To 
play and land such a fish is a feat any man may be 
proud of, and thesurf anglershould haveall the credit 
coming to him. 



AT THE TRAPS. 

Professionalism at the trap was brought about by 
the necessity of educating the general public up to 
trap shooting. The sport of inanimate target shoot- 
ing did not catch tho popular fancy vory readily at tho 
outset. Something had to bo done to get tho people 
interested in the sport. At one time a certain cart- 
ridge company took a team of Eastern shooters and a 
team from the West and wont round the country giv- 
ing exhibitions much after the plan of the circus peo- 
ple. The skill of the membors of each team was of the 
highest class, and crowds witnessed their performances, 
with the result that trap shooting took a boom and 




"WE KNOW WHO SHOT THE DUCKS!" 

gun clubs began to be organized all over the country. 
Then came the struggle for patronage on the part of 
the different gun and ammunition houses. This led to 
the employment of many of tho best shots as trade 
representatives, whose sole business it was to attend 
shoots and show off tho products of their respective 
employers. These men wore naturally most expert, 
and, shooting in the sweepstakes as they did, thoy 
just as naturally won about 80 or 85 per cent, of every 
purse. At first the amateurs did not care about this, 
or perhaps they did not notice it. But it finally got 
to be such a monotonous thing, this putting up money 
to fatten the professionals' pockotbooks, that tho 
amateurs rebelled and showed their disapproval by 
remaining at home instead of going to a shoot and 
"contributing." Once the amateur failod to come to 
a shoot, tho professional's doom was sealed. He be- 
came no longor of service to his employer, because 
there was nobody shooting whom he could influence 
to use his company's products. Professionals, how- 
ever, will not be done away with altogether; their 
ranks will be thinned, but thore will still be some of 
them left. The modus operandi will, of nocessity, be 
changed; they will have to "shoot for targets only" 
and will not be permitted to take part in tho purses in 
the sweepstake events. 



There was a time when the professional class was 
very useful to its employers. The public wantod edu- 
cating, and tho sport needed introducing to notico. 
Now that same public is oxtromely well edncatod, and 
there is no more popular sport than that of trap- 
shooting. Of course special brands of powders, special 
makes of guns and special shells will still noed intro- 
ducing to tho shooters, but the great "booming period" 
has gone forever in trap-shooting; and outside of tho 
small minority directly interested in tho work no one 
else will regret it. Much good has been done by tho 
temporary introduction of tho professional class into 
the ranks of the trap-shooters. The romarkablo work 
done by professionals has attracted universal attention, 
and has caused many to take an interest in and to be- 
come finally infatuatod with the sport who would 
otherwise have never heard of "clay pigeonb. " The 
prominence, al90, given to the sport has had its effects 



in clearing tho shooting world of many abuses that, 
made it a byword. Formerly, and not many years 
ago either, a man who slim a!, tho traps was looked 
down upon by his neighbors: now it's tho reverse, and 
trap-shooting has become the sport of tho business 
man in his hours of recreation. Tho drawing of a 
strict line between professionals and amateurs is a long 
stride in the right direction. 



Notwithstanding tho fact that tho traps of the pres- 
ent day throw the targets farther and faster than in 
the past, practice, better guns and quicker loads have 
enabled shooters to keep up with the procession. .lust 
as in tho matter of the armament of the navy, it has 
been a fight botween tho manufacturers of armorplate 
and the manufacturers of high power guns and armor 
piercing shells; so in the inanimate target business it 
has been a fight between the manufaoturers of traps 
and targets and the manufacturers of guns and pow- 
ders. In both instances tho strugglo for supremacy 
has been keen, and has resulted in tho presont high 
class of all the articles mentioned. In trap shooting 
honors are about oven, and experts in naval matters 
stato that tho same result has been attained in their 
branch of arms, explosives and armor plate. 



CARTRIDGE AND SHELL. 

Miller & Lux have on their Kern county lands a 
band of botween 75 and 100 oiks, a noble animal rapidly 
becoming extinct. The corporation has offerod the 
elk to the Order of Elks in this State, and the various 
branches of this great fraternal organization are con- 
sidering the proposition with a view to obtaining a 
reserve for them. 



Petite, piquant Miss Victory Bushnell, is tho subject 
of our illustration this week. The picture was taken 
at the Field and Tule Club house recently by Fred 
Bushnell. The sweet little Diana, despite her few 
summers, takes groat delight in the outing trips of her 
parents and has, for one of her age, a surprising 
knowledge of shooting and fishing matters. 



The Los Angeles gun clubs have been enjoying ex- 
ceptionally fine sport, in spite of the dry weather. 
Shooting during the week ending January 18th, has 
been eminently satisfactory, and as the open season 
for ducks and quail closes February 1, hunters were 
preparing to make the most of the remaining time. 

The members of the Centinela club were out in force 
Thursday last week. A party consisting of John C. 
Cline. Archie Freeman, Major Daniel Freeman, Cap- 
tian Banning. Nat Myrick and Willard Stimson, killed 
154 birds, most of which were sprigs. 



Many shooters, particularly those who reside in or 
near the centorof largo populations, are very genorally 
of the opinion that smokeless powders for shotguns 
have knocked out black powders. The firms who load 
the majority of shells sent out over the country tell a 
far difforent tale. In fact, black powder loaded shells 
for shotguns are in a majority of ten to one. This 
will astonish most people who shoot at the trap, for 
black powdor is generally barred in all competitions 
on account of its noise and volume of smoke, both of 
which are vory annoying to men at tho score. On the 
other hand, it shows that tho vast bulk of shooting 
done in this country is not at the traps, but in the 
swamps, woodlands and prairies of tho United States. 



It seems a great pity that the government either 
will not, or cannot, protect the few remaining buffalo 
in the Yellowstone National Park from the raids of the 
skin-hunters. It is undoubtedly a hard matter to 
properly police the park: but difficult as it is it can be 
done, and yet not cost a fortune to do it. 

The buffalo are scarce enough now: another year or 
two like the last will settle them all, and there will 
then be nooxcusofor tho govornment to plead. From 
all hands will come that old cry "We told you so." 
Tho government knows the state of the case, but up 
to date it doos not seem to have taken more than ordi- 
nary pains to insure tho last remnants of the mighty 
herds of buffalo that onco roamed over the prairies in 
countless thousands, against uttor destruction, by hido 
and head hunters. 

The Vellowstono Park is deservedly the greatest 
game reservation and greatest national park in the 
world, and it is only meet that within its borders 
should be preserved, instoad of leaving the matter to 
private parks, the remaining spocimons of porhaps 
tho noblest of boasts of this great continent. 



A press dispatch from Auburn dated January 27th, 
recounts a tragedy which transpired noar Forrest Hill, 
Placer county, wherein one Frank Said was accident- 
ally killed last Sunday by his hunting companion, 
Albort Ralston, while the two were indulging in a 
doer hunt. It is just possible that these two hunters (?) 
were as inoxporionced in woodcraft and tho handling 
of firearms as they were, to place tho most charitable 
construction on their trip to tho hills, ignorant of the 
gamo statuto which provides a close season on deer at 
this time of tho year. While hunting casualties have 
been somowhat fow in this State during tho hunting 
seasons last closed, still thore have been a number of 
fatal accidonts, tho particulars concerning this last 
one being tho following: The men had discovered 
fresh tracks, and Said volunteered to climb a hill and 
get in tho rear of tho gamo. Ralston heard a noise in 
tho brush, and, mistaking Said's gray hat for a deer, 
fired his rifle, killing him instantly. At tho inquest 
held on January 27th, at Forest Hill, Ralston was com- 
pletely exonerated, tho two having boon close friends. 
Said saw service as a surgoon in tho Philippines, and 
had an honorable discharge. His homo was in Dela- 
ware, O. 



On a hot day drink Jackson's Napa Soda lemonade 
and be refreshed. 



10 



@Dh£ Qvteftzv axxtf ^portent an 



[February 1, 1902 



Steelhead Fishing. 



A number of local anglers found the 
"White house" pool in the tide waters 
at Point Reyes to be productive of sport 
and a few largo fish last Sunday. Among 
the fishermen trying their luck were 
John Gallagher, A. C. Cunningham, J. 
Fatjo, Theodore Rothschild, E. E. 
Stevens, F. Carroll, H. Battu, S. Riordan 
and Charles Precht. Carroll seems to 
have been high hook with a catch of 
seven steelhead, the largest of which 
weighed fourteen and one-half pounds. 
These fish, all but two, were caught on a 
No. 3 Wilson spoon and after this spoon 
was lost a No. 4 Wilson spoon was sub- 
stituted. The other fish were caught 
with fresh roe. These fish made but 
little fight. 



The season just closed on Russian river 
has been a better one for the angler than 
has prevailed for about five years past. 
The run of ocean fish ready to go up to 
the spawning grounds has been a very 
good one indeed. From the beginning 
the net men have been in evidence and 
undoubtedly caught many fish. They 
paid well for their temerity however, as, 
in all, eleven nets were seized and con- 
fiscated. Many sportsmen argue that a 
close season for a year or more would be 
of incalculable benefit in re-stocking the 
coast streams with steelhead. The ang- 
ler, although in toto his catch amounts 
to a round number of fish, is by no means 
so great a factor as the net men and fish 
spearers. These latter are at the illegal 
game night and day to a far greater ex- 
tent than is generally known. For in- 
stance at San Gregoiio and Pescadero 
when the fish are running-, the natives 
line the banks for a long distance. Fires 
built on the shore and burning high, 
illuminate the poaching saturnalia, plainly 
disclosing the approach of each fish, sal- 
mon or steelhead, as it swims through 
the ocean rollers and into the placid 
waters of the lagoon, its course to the 
mouth of the stream being eagerly 
watched. It is a wary fish indeed that 
passes through the gauntlet and escapes 
a grave in the briny barrels of the human 
cormorants stationed along the stream. 

The fecundity of the steelhead is <jreat 
else the species had been exterminated 
long ago. It has been noticed and com- 
mented upon, by fishermen, for instance, 
some seasons the ranks of the winter run 
of steelheadsin tho Paper Mill tidewaters 
has been sadly depleted and but a very 
few fish have been able to go up stream 
and spawn. Theso few fish ' however 
have been enough to make the supply of 
ti>h the following' year a noticeable one. 
If the fish could he taken and strippod of 
spawn at a hatchet ,v the same as is done 
with salmon, wonderful results would be 
accomplished in re-stocking the coast 
streams with steelhead. An instance of 
the feasibility of such a scheme is shown 
in the sticce-s f ul efforts of the Ukiah 
hatchery superintendent. Col. La Motto, 
in keeping the streams of Sonoma. Napa 
and other counties stocked with fish. 

Many anglers are loth to entertain the 
scheme of a close season such as prevails 
in the case of the brook trout, for the 
reason that the big fellows, the ones who 
give the angler a jolly fight, are only 
available during the winter run. 

Some Impressions of the Game Law. 



The open season on feathered game 
in this State closed yesterday. In the 
list of protected birds we find every kind 
quail, partridges, grouse, sage hens, all 
varieties of wild duck, rail, curlew, ibis 
and plover. English snipe, geese, swans, 
robins and a number of other birds are 
not on the protected lists. English snipe 
and swans should, without doubt, be 
enumerated in the list. The subject 
of protection for robins and meadow larks 
has been pretty well threshed out and the 
question still remains unsolved. 

Reports from all over the State, how- 
ever, seem to determine that tho majority 
sportsmen are in accord on one argu 



game law are exasperating to many dev- 
otees of gun and rod. Choleric individ- 
uals will and have violated hated, unfair 
or class provisions of the law — these are 
just the results that have been counted 
upon. Gamo law violations have been 
used as capital and awful examples, stren- 
uous efforts have been made and lying ex- 
aggerated statements published to the 
effect that the most drastic measures and 
methods were absolutely necessary to 
preserve the "valuable food supply of the 
people." Harping on the same string 
the apostles of game protection advo- 
cated extra county policing (for a consid- 
eration) this would naturally be followed 
by the advocacy of a corps of State offi- 
cers Protection of fish and game by 
proper and paid supervision, both State 
and county, is good and necessary, but 
fake protection of fish and game and for 
the schemed benefit of one or more indi- 
viduals is another thing. 

One result of the abortive attempt to 
provide a fat office for one of the apostles 
last year during the sessions of tho legis- 
lature, is the antagonism and wide breach 
between the city and country sportsmen 
— of course there are many individual 
exceptions. 

The independent city shooter has a 
hard time of it when he goes fifty miles 
away from this city, unless he has friends 
in the country. On and adjacent to 
most of the preserves the club men are 
at war with the country shooters. 

Tho elimination of the statutory pro- 
hibition against the use of guns larger 
than a ten guago was craftily accounted 
for by the statement that the limit bag 
of fifty made such discrimination now 
unnecessary. This is false and mislead- 
ing. The non-mention of large bore 
guns was in the interest of a firearms 
corporation against whose guns laws and 
ordinances have been directed, and in 
subsequent litigation decisions were ren- 
dered, that able lawyers claim will not 
stand. The non-mention of any kind of 
gun would decrease the chances cf future 
litigation. 

Of one certain style of fish and game 
law protection — the diversion of the 
money of the State for missionary pur- 
poses in the formation of so-called fish 
and game protective associations which 
have been notoriously unsuccessful in tho 
dual work of fish and game protection 
and also in the prosecution and conviction 
of alleged violators of the law, but emi- 
nently successful in creating clais an- 
tagonism and forming political clubs — we 
will have something to say later on. 



I. 



aversion for the present gamo law and its 
particular sponsors has been shown in 
its persistent violation. Quail have been 
marketed and are served in hotels and 
restaurants with the same impunity that 
wild ducks are served in these establish- 
ments the year round. 

Both ducks and quail have been very 
plentiful this year. The presence of the 



different localities being contingent upon 
weather conditions and feed. The dry 
winter has not made quail hunting, in 
many respects, as good as some seasons 
we have known. 



XJIGHEST GRADE BARRED 
Ai - Rock Kegs, $3 per setting. 
ABERNETHY, SMI 3!i th St " 



PLYMOUTH 
WILLIAM .1 
Oakland, Cal. 



RACE RECORD 
(4 yrs) 2:1 1 



Baron dale 20184 

Sire BARON W ILKKS 3:18, sire of Bumps (wagon) 2:03*; Rubenstein (p) 2:05, Rachel (p-41 2:08u 
Baron Rogers ~':UH' 4 . Oakland Baron 2:09^. Red Silk (p-4) 2:10, and 25 in 2:1ft list 

First dam NATHALIE (trial 2:21) by Nutwood 000 (champion of all sires 168 in 2:30 list ( dam of 
BARONDALE (p) 2:11^ and Grand Baron 2:1a* k 

Second dam HEATKICE by Cuyler 100 (sire of J.ucy Cuyler (trial) 2:1ft, Elvira (4) 2:18'/j, world's 
record when made, and 1ft others in 2:30 list) dam of Patron 2:14!* (sire of 28 in 2:10 to 2:311) 
Patronage 4143 isire of Alix 1 queen of the turf) 2:03%) and Prodigal 2:16. 

Third dam MARY MAMBKINO (great broodmare) by .Uainbriiio Fatchen. 

Fifth dam LADY BELL by Bellfouiuler, and so on to the twelfth dam. BARONDALE Is one 
of the best bred horses in the world. 

SEASON 1903 AT 

SAN JOSE RACE TRACK. 

Terms, $40 for the season, with usual return privileges. 

San Jose, Cal. 



For further particulars address 



TOM JAMES. 1130 Alameda Ave , 




ZOMBRO 2:11 



ITAl 1A 3:33'i, winner of Occident Stake of 
1901, and ZEFHYK (three year-old 
trial 2:I3V' 2 ), sold for $9000, 
Will make the Season of 1902 at 

Agricultural Park, Los Angeles 

From February 1st to June 1st. 

ZOMBRO is by McKinney 2:11 * (sire of 19 la 
2:15). dam Whisper by Almont Lightning 

ZOMBRO was a great racehorse and Is the 
most promising young sire In America to- 
day. All his get trot fast and have great 
beauty of form. 

Terms fo- the Season, $50. 

With usual return privileges. 
GEO T. BECKERS, University P O , Cal. 



THE STANDARD-BRED TROTTING STALLION 



BOODLE Jr. 



I BY BOODLE 2:12!4, sire of Ethel Downs 2:10.' 

Thompson 2:14* and 4 others in 2:30 and better 
•j He by Stranger, sire of 33 In 2:30. 

I Dam NINA B. by Electioneer, sire of Arion2:07%, Sunol 
I 2:08*, Palo 2:08%, and 160 more in 2:30 list. 



BOODLE Jr. is one of the best bred, best looking and best stallions on the Pacific Coast. All of 
his get have size, style and speed. He will make the Season of 1902 at 

THE DAN PORTER LIVERY STABLE, WATSONV1LLE. 

Terms— S35 for the season ending July 1st. For further particulars address 

F. M. HAMMETT, Watsonvllle, Cal. 



HART BOSWELL 13699 




Sire ONWARD 2:25 1=4 

Sire of 

Pearl Onward 2:06 1-2 

Beuzetta 2:06 3-4 

Gazette 2:07 1=4 

Colbert 2:07 1=2 

Onward Silver 2:08 

Pilatus 2:09 1-4 

Col. Thornton 2:09 1=2 

Major Mason 2:09 3=4 

Cornelia Belle 2:10 

and 150 more in 2:30. 



THE BEST BRED STALLION 
IN CALIFORNIA 

Dam NANCY LEE 

Dam of 

NANCY HANKS 2:04 

Dam of 

ADMIRAL DEWEY (3) »:14^ 4 

NANCY' STAM 2:30 

By DICTATOR 

Sire of 

DIRECTOR -. 

Sire of 

DIRECTUM '.'Mi.-.i, 

DIRECT 3:05tf 

Sire of 

DIRECTLY 2:03* 

BONNIE DIRECT... 3:05* 

REY DIRECT 3 : io 

and many others. 



WILL MAKE THE SEASON OE 1903 AT RANCHO DEL VALLE 



3ASAKTTON. 



For particulars address 



GEORGE A. DAVIS, Pleasanton, Cal. 



THE CHAMPION SIRE OF EARLY AND EXTREME SPEED 



of 



ment and that is that the season has been 
closed too early, by two weeks at least. 
In many sections the best duck shooting 
is had in January and February. In 
many localities ducks do not make their 
appearance until the middle of October 
or beginning of November. 

The puzzle to every sportsman is, what 
was the cause and reason for shortening 
the season on ducks during a time when 
the shooting was generally at its best. 

We firmly believe that this and other 
game law juggling was part of the scheme 
formulated by interested parties for the 
purpose of individual gain and profit, 
directly and indirectly, and not for the 
expedient and proper purpose of protect- 
ing game and fish. 

Some of the present provisions of the 



NUTWOOD WILKES. 

He is the only Stallion that ever produced two three-year olds in one season with 
records of 3:13 and 3:12* respectively. Who Is It, ex-champion three-year-old 
gelding of the world, reduced his record to 2:10*. John A. McKerron 2:06% (2:12* 
as a th.ee-year old) now holds the champion stallion record to wagon. 

NUTWOOD WILKES will make the Season of 1902 at the 

NUTWOOD STOCK FARM, from Feb. 1st to July 1st. 
Fee = $50 Nutwood Wilkes 22116 



RACE RECORD 2:16* 

Slra of JOHN A. McKERRON, . .. 3:06ji 
By GUY WILKES ... . 2:lfi* 

Dam LIDA .W. (by Nutwood 2:i8%). . .2:18* 



For the Season 



IS THE SIRE OF 



John A. McKerron. .2:06% 
Champion Stallion 
Matinee rec(w'g'n) 
3-year-old race rec:2:12* 

Who Is It 2:10* 

3-year-old race ree.2:12 

Stanton Wilkes 2:10* 

Cieorgie B 2:12* 

Claudius 2:13* 

Boblngersoll 2:14% 

Irvington Boy 2:17% 

Irvington Belle 2:18* 

Echora Wilkes 2:1854 



Rosewood 2:21 

Central Girl 2:22* 

Wilkes Direct 2:23* 

Alix B 2:24'/, 

Who Is She 2:25 

Fred Wilkes 2:26* 

Verona 2:27 

Queen C 2:28* 

Electress 2:28% 

Daugestar 2:29 

T. C. (3) 2:30 

Dam of Iloilo, 2:29V, 



With return privileges 
if horse remains my 
property. Good pastur- 
age at $3 per month- 
Bills payable before re- 
moval of mare. Stock 
well cared for, but no re- 
sponsibility assumed for 
accidents and escapes 

Young stock by Nutwood Wilkes for sale. 

For further particulars apply or address 

MARTIN CARTER Nutwood Stock Farm, Irvington, Alameda Co., Cal. 




February 1, 1902] 



Wixc gvecbcv mill portent an 



11 



Mistakes of Poultry Farmers. 

In looking over the average poultry 
house in winter, the most common defects 
are damp floors, upon which the fowls 
stand and mope, and sometimes contract 
rheumatism. Broken windows, letting 
cold in upon the fowls in daytime, will 
check laying, and are common causes of 
roup; droppings left for weeks to heap up 
under the roosts ; lack of a supply of 
water, or dirty drinking viands; lack of 



plenty of good sharp grit, which alone is 
a sufficient cause of failure; lack of fresh 
meat and cut bone, which should be fed 
twice a week ; overfeeding, overcrowding, 
and furnishing no inducement to scratch 
for a living. These are the most common 
and important mistakes, and those who 
wonder why the r hens do not lay will do 
well to go over the list.- CdL Cultivator. 



Ten months is long enough for any pig 
to live. If it is not large enough and fat 



Great Sale of Thoroughbreds 

AND TROTTING STOCK. 

Eighty Head of Stallions, Mares, Colts and Fillies, 



-FROM THE- 



SONOMA STOCK FARM, 

Notice is hereby given that under authority of an order of Court, made December .10, 1901, J. B 
Walden Jr., administrator of the Estate of James B. Chase, deoeased, will soil at public auction 

TUESDAY, February 4, 1902, at 10 a. m. 

AT STOCK YARDS, 1732 MARKET ST., SAN FRANCISCO, 

all the great thoroughbred producing brood mares, stallions, yearlings, two, three and four year old 
colts and Allies, full brothers and sisters to winners, including the stallion Dare by imp. Darebin, and 
the mares Marigold, Centella, Mischief, Rebecca, Catalina and many others all royally bred in pro- 
ducing lines. Also 20 head of well bred trotters. 

Catalogues now ready. Stock at yard Friday, January 31st. 

W. H. HORD, Live Stock Auctioneer, 

1732 Market Street, San Francisco 



The 

Best 
Goods 
at 
the 
Lowest 
Prices. 



II 



r 



Light 
Wagons, 
Light 
Harness 
and 
Boots 
Our 
Specialty. 



We carry in stock the Finest Line of Light Speed and 
Road Wagons on the Coast. We are Agents and have 
on hand the Celebrated Faber Sulky and Speed 
Wagons, the Best in the World 

Oakland Carriage and Implement Co. 



362-64-60 Twelfth Street, Oakla nd. 



I'HIX. STEIN. ManaKer. 



BALLISTITE 

The Highest Perfection of Modern 
Shotgun Smokeless Powder, stands 

Pre-eminently the Best 

Being Absolutely Smokeloss, Odorless, Non-Fouling, No Residue, Never 
Pits nor Corrodes the Barrel, Keeps forever Under Any Conditions. 
Breech and Barrel Pressures lowor than any other Powder, 
Combustion Perfect, giving Invariably the Highest Velocity, 
with the Most Even Patterns and No Stringing of Shot. 



Cartridges loaded with KAL.L.ISTITE can be obtained from the leading 
Cartridge Companies, Gud and Ammunition Dealers, or the Sole Agents. 



J. H. LAU &, CO, 



75 Chambers St., New York City. 

A postal brings " Shooting Facts." 



Importers and Dealers In Fire Arms, Ammunition and Fencing Goods. 



enough to kill at the end of that time it 
is not wortli keeping The feed used in 
keeping a pig alive is lost, it is only the 
feed which makes the pig grow which 
gives any returns to the owner.— .Vrmp/i/i< 
Comma rial Apptal. 




Tit V 'I'll FOB 

Oomrlis, Colds, 
Asthma, Bronchitis, 

Hoarseness, 
and Sore Throat. 



FOR SALE. 

Tnree Fine Draoaiit Stallions 

KKKSNO, gray horse, weighs 2KK), live years 
old, Norman Percheron. winner of three llrst prizes. 

PLUTO, black horse, four years old, Norman 
Percheron, winner of three first prizes. 

PRTDE OF THE PRAIRIE, bay horse. Shire, 
winner of first prizes in England and America and 
never beaten. 

All these horses are sound, in good condition and 
sure foal getters. Apply to 

QEO. GRAY, llayminlK, C'al. 



FOR SALE. L 



FOR SALE. 

Percheron St'llions. 

fpHREE HIGH-CLASS PERCHERON STAL- 
* lions for sale. For pedigree, price and particu- 
lars address 

J. v. BEA 1. 1.. Laton, Cal. 

MONEY-MAKING HORSE 
Specialty; long established. 
Only persons with capital and closely identified 
with horsemen need respond. 13UNTIN DRUG 
CO , Terre Haute. Indiana. 

Coast Agents 

McMURRAY'S 
Sulkies, Carts and Speed Wagons 

WHEELS TO ORDER 

FOR SULKIES AND CARTS 
at wis. $21 and 825 per pair. 



Meet Your Friends 
at the Palace Hotel 

Tourists and Travelers who 
make the Palace their headquar- 
ters are surrounded withTconve- 
niences and comforts such as are 
not obtainable in any other hotel 
in tho West. Off tho court are 
the ,i rill rooms, telegraph and 
telephone offices, writing rooms, 
barber shop, billiard parlor, car- 
riage office, book stand and type- 
writer offices. 

On one side of this immense 
hotel — the largest in the world — 
is tho wholesale and manufactur- 
ing district; on the other thea- 
tres, retail stores, clubs, railroad 
offices, banks and newspaper 
buildings. 

Street cars to all parts of the 
city — depots, ferries, Cliff House 
and parks — pass the entrance. 

American Plan. European Plan 



Yiv. Will Pav 




Phone 
White 81 



KENNEV BICYCLE CO., 
531 Valencia St., San Francisco 



$5000 

REWARD 

to any person who will 
prove any letter or en- 
dorsement which we pub- 
lish concerning the value 
and curative powers of 

Turtle's Elixir 

to be fraudulent or spurious. It is the 
best known and most highly endorsed 
veterinary remedy in the World. 

Used and Kndm-si d hi/ Adams Kxpress Co, 

Tuttle'sFamilyElixir;; : ;; 

sprains, bruises, etc. 
Our 100 page book, 
ence," FREE. 

Dr. S. A. TUTTLE, 61 Beverly St., Hoaton, Mass, 
Tuttle's Elixir Co.. 437 0'Farrell St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Beware of so-called Elijt i» — nonr ppnulnc Itnl TtiMlc'w. 
a.void all bllsters;they offer only tem|>oTnry relief it any. 



rheu- 

S 111 , 

Kills pain instantly. 
'Veterinary Expen- 



ay 
; LEADING 
HORSEMEN 




JAY-EYE SEE 




Mr. J. I. Case, (Hickory Grove Farm, hor 
of Jay-Eye-See) Raclue, Wis., says: "After try- 
ing every known remedy, I remoTeU u large 
Bunch of two years standing from a3-veurol,l |g 
filly, with three applications of 

Quinn's Ointment. 



W.B.EDOY&CO, 
i WHITEHALL 



It U the best preparation I have ever used or heard 
of. I heartily recommend It to all Horsemen. 

We have hundretta of sttch testimonial*. 

Price 91.00 per packnse. S3 

Ask your druggist for It. If be does not keep It wo 
will send prepaid on receipt nf price. Addreae 

W. B. EDDY & CO., Whitehall, N. Y. 



Kendalls Spavin Cure 



READ WHAT THIS MAN HAS TO SAY. 

Kt. Grant, Arizona, Apr. 10th, 1900. 
Dr. B. J. Kendall Co., Gentlemen : — I hava the honor to Inform 
you that yonr Kendall'. Spavin cure lathe he^t liniment, I belleTe, 
fn the world. I hate brrn a harrier In the United Slat*. Army for 
14 yeara, and have never Ufted anything loeoual It. I had a horse 
with hip joint lament.., a epavln, awelled glands and ahouldtr 
lameneaa. I need twobotllesof vour Spavin Cure and thry are 
aoond and well. Your, reapeclfnlly, SILAS JOlINSuN, Farrier. 



There Is no use taking chances on a lump. You 
can never tell what it may develop. If you have a 
supply of •'Kendall's" on hand you are safe from 
Spavin, Ringbone, Splints, Curb and all forms 
of Lameness. The I'. ,S. Army knows good things 
and buys only the best. 

On sale at nil druppists. Prico 81; 
six bottles for 85. UnequnU'd lini- 
ment for family use. Book "A 
Treatise on the Horse," mailed 
free. Address 

DR. B. J. KENDALL CO. 

Enosburg Falls, VI. 



HOLSTEIN CATTLE. 

SLEEPY HOLLOW RANCH, SAN ANSELMO, MARIN CO., CAL 

I OFFER FOR SALE 

Johanna 5th's PAUL OE KOL 22372 H.F.H.B. 

His dam, Johanna 5th, lias official record at 4 years: milk 
89.3 lbs. one day, 16,180.5 lbs. one year: butter, 23.50 lbs. 
one week. His sire's dam, Duchess Clothilde, has official 
record: milk, 88.0 lbs. one day, 18,046.9 lbs. one year; 
butter, 23.05 lbs. one week. He was bred by Gillett cfc Son 
of Rosendale, Wis. His pedigree includes the greatest cows 
in the world. Having a number of his daughters now in 
milk and many cows in calf to him, I let him go to make 
room for my other seven premier sires. 

For further particular, address R ^ HOTALING, 

431 Jackaon Street, San Franclaco, Cat* 




12 



[February 1, 1902 



WESTCHESTER RACING ASSOCIATION. 

i tTDKB Tin: AUSPIOM <>k THE .kh kky <m h. 



RACE COURSE, 
MORRIS PARK, 
WESTCHESTER, N. Y. 



OFFICE, Room 201, 571 Fifth Ave., 
"The Windsor Arcade," 

NEW YORK. 



Spring and Autumn Meetings, 1902. 

THE FOLLOWING RACES ARE OPENED TO 

CLOSE MIDNIGHT OF SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 15th. 

with a Supplementary t'loslnR for some ax by the conditions. 

SPRING MEETING 

For Two=Year Olds. 



Washington Jockey Club. 



WASHINGTON, D. C. 



Race Course and Office 
During Race Meetings, 
BENNINCS, D. C. 



Office in New York, 

Room 20I, 571 Fifth Ave. 
"The Windsor Arcade.' 



Spring and Autumn Meetings, 1902. 

Spring Meeting from the Last Week in March to and include Aprii 12th, 



THE GAIETY-FILLIES-$1,400 Added. 
The Gaiety, for Allies two years old by sub- 
scrlption of $25 each, $10 forfe.t. wit ML- • ' ; 
To carry Hi lbs. winners extra. Last Jour ana a 
half furlongs. Eclipse Course. 

THE BOUQUET-$L200 Added. 
The Bouquet (Selling), for two-year olds i by 
subscription of $25 each. IfO forlei t. will * M 
added. Last tire furlongs oj the Eclipse ( ourse. 
THE LAUREATE-$1,500 Added.' 

The Laureate, for two-year 9}*%^ '"^^Jf 
tion of $30 each, half forfeit, vvith *l.a<« • ddnl. 
Colts to carry 115 lbs., fillies and ge dings ,12 ItaL 
Winners extra; maidens allowed 5 lbs Last n<e 
furlongs of the Eclipse Course 

For Three=\ear 0!Ds. 

THE LARCHMONT-$I,400 Added. 

The Lahchmont, for maiden thrf -year-olds at 
time of entry, by subscription of l»eaell. 110 for- 
feit, with $1,200 added Colts to carrj |» »«*•■ 
geldings llglV.and Allies i ll. lbs. Winnersextra. 
Lust seven furlongs oj the Withers Mile. 

THE BAYCHESTER-$t,200 Added. 

The Baychester, for three-year olds, non-win- 
ners of aTace of the value of SI .000111 i WW, by sub- 
scrlption of $45 each. $10 forfeit wi i h »1 900 added, 
of which $300 to the second, MM to the Minx 
Colts to carry 115 lbs,: geld.ngs 1 14 lbs ,andfll»« 
110 lbs Winners in 1904 extra. Non-winning and 
maiden allowances. The » it/iers .)/!'<-. 

THE VAN NEST— $ 1,200 Added 

The Van Nest (Selling), for three-year-olds, at 
10 lbs. under the scale, by subscription of $y> each. 
$10 forfeit, with 11.200 added. Last sir ami a halj 
furlongs of the Withers Mile. 

THE POCANTICO— $1,500 Added. 

The Pocantico Handicap, for three year olds, 
bv subscription of $30 each, only $10 if declared by 
2 p m. ot the day before the race; with »1«0 
added, of which $300 to the second $200 to the 
third. Mile unit <i sixteenth orer the mU. 

For Three- Year=01ds and Upwards 

THK METROPOLITAN— $7,500 Added. 

The Metropolitan Handicap, for three-year 
olds and upwards, by subscription of 1100 each, 
half forfeit, or $10 only if declared March i20lh with 
$7 500 added Weight-, to beannounced March 4th, 
1912. The Withers Mile. 

THE HARLEM-* 1, 300 Added. 

The Hahi.e.m (Selling), at 10 lbs. above the 
scale for three-yea -Olds and upward by subscrip- 
tion of $25 eaeh,'$ ;o f.nfeii. wiiu $l.2u0 added. / he 
Withers Mile. 

THE TOBOGGAN-* 1. 500 Added. 

The Toboccan HANDICAP, for three-year-olds 
and upward, by sun c ipm.ii of MO each, $10 only 
if declared by 2 P M oi th- day before the race, 
with $1,500 added. Eclipse Course. 

THE NEW ROCHELLE— $1,400 Added. 
The New Rociiei.i.e Handii-ap. for three-year- 
olds and upward, by subscription of $45 each, $10 
only if declared by 4 p. M of the day before the 
race, with 11,900 added. Last seren furlongs of 
the Withers Mile. 

SPRING SERIAL HANDICAPS— $3,700 Added. 

Spring Serial Handicaps, for three-year olds 
and upward. By subscription of $30 each, whic h 
shall entitle the entry to start in The Crotona, 
The Claremont and The Van Courtlandt Handi- 
caps on the payment of an additional starting fee 
of $10 for each race. 

Conditions ok The Crotona Handicap 
Starters to pay $10 additional with II Ouu added. 
The last six furlongs of the Withers Mile. 

Conditions ok The Claremont Handicap 
Starters to pay $10 additional with $1,400 added. 
Last six and a half furlongs of the Withers Mile. 

Conditions ok The Van Courtlandt Handi- 
cap. Starters to pay $10 each, $1500 added. Last 
seren furlongs of the Withers Mile. 

JOCKEY CLUB WEIGHT FOR AGE RACE— 
$.2,000 Added. 
The Jockey Club Weight kor Age Race for 
three-year-olds and upward, by subscription of $10 
each, starters to pay *I5 additional with $4,000 
added. Mile and a furlong. Withers Course. 

AMATEUR CUP— Selling— $1,000 Added. 
The Amateur Cup, a high-weight selling race 
at 40 lbs. above the scale. Of $450 in plate, and 
$750 in cash, for three-year-olds and upward, by 



KNICKERBOCKER HURDLE HANDICAP— 
$600 Added. 

Knickerbocker Hurdle Handicap, for four- 
year-olds and upward, by subscription of $10 each. 
Starters to pav $15 additional. The Westchester 
Racing Association to add $6oo. Mile ami three- 
quarters over siren flight of hurdles. 
NEW YORK STEEPLECHASE— $750 Added. 
New York Steeplechase, at 10 lbs under the 
scale, for four-year-olds and upward, by subscrip- 
tion of $10 each. Starters to pay $15 additional. 
The Westchester Racing Association to add $750. 
About two mites. 

INTERNATIONAL STEEPLECHASE HANDI- 
CAP— $1,000 Added. 
International Steeplechase Handicap, for 
four-year-olds and upward, by subscription of $10 
each. Starters to pay $15 additional. The West- 
chester Racing Association to add $1,000. About 
two miles. 

THE GRAND NATIONAL STEEPLECH ASE- 
$5,000 Added. 
The Grand National Steeplechase. A 
handicap for four year-olds and upward By sub- 
scription of $11X1 each, half forfeit, only $45 if de- 
clared by 2 P. M on the day preceding the race, 
with $5000 added— $4,500 by subscriptions of gen- 
tlemen interested in steeplechasing and $4,500 by 
the Westchester Racing Association. About two 
miles and u half. 

THE MEADOWBROOK HUNTERS STEEPLE- 
CHASE-$1.000 Added. 
The MIADOWBROQJK. A Hunters Steeplechase 
for four year-olds and upward, qualified under the 
rules of the National Steeplechase and Hunt 
Association, or the Canadian Hunt Association, 
that have been regularly bunted during the season 
of 1901-1902 By subscription of $15 each, play or 
pay, if made by February 15. 1902. or of $30 each, 
play or pay, if made by April 26, 1902, with $1,000 
added. Mr. August Belmont to add a Cup of the 
value of $100 to the winner, if ridden by a gentle- 
man rider. About two miles and a half. 

To be run at the Autumn 
Meeting, 1902. 

St/pjiif-tnetitary fCntriea to ( lose Amjrst /.">. 1000. 

For T\vo=Year=01ds. 

THE NURSERY HANDICAP-$>,500 Added. 

The Nursery Handicap, for two-vear-old.s' 
foals of 1900, If entered August 15, 1901, by sub- 
scription of $15 each, the only forfeit if declared 
May 1, 1904, or $25 if declared by 2 p. m. on the day 
before the race. If left in after that time to pay 
$50 each. 

If entered February 15, 1902, by subscription of 
$45 each, the only forreit if declared May I, 1902, 
or $50 if declared by 2 p. m. on the day before the 
race. If left in after that time to pay $100 each. 

If entered August 15. 1902. when the event shall 
close by subscription of $75 each, the only forfeit if 
declared by 2 p. m. on the day before the race. If 
left in after that time to pay $150 each. With 
$2,500 added. The Eclipse Course. 

THE CHAMPAGNE-$»,(J00 Added. 
The Champagne, for two-year-olds, by subscrip- 
tion of $50 each if entered February 15, 1902, half 
forfeit, or $10 only if declared by August 15, 1902, 
or, if entered August 15, 1902, when the event shall 
be closed, at $100 each, half forfeit, with $1,000 
added. Last seren furlongs of the Withers Mile. 

WHITE 



The Handicaps— The Consolation, The Dixie, 
The Vestal— as below will close and name at mid- 
night of Saturday February 15th, 1902. 

The Bennings Spring Handicaps. 



To be 



the 



Spring 



Irst and last dui/x u 
Meeting, lttoi. 
Handicaps for three-year-olds and upward. By 
subscription of $10 each, which shall entitle the 
entry to start in the First and Second Handicaps, 
on payment of the additional starting fee of $40 in 
each To close and name at midnight of Saturday, 
February 15th. 1904. Weights to be announced 
March 4th, 1902. 

Conditions ok the First Bennings Spring 
Handicap Starters to pay $40 each additional, 
with $700 added, sir furlongs 

Conditions ok the Second Bennings Spring 
Handicap. Starters to pay $20 additional with 
$1,000 added. Seren furlongs. 

Autumn Meeting* 1902. 

THE GRAND CONSOLATION— $2,500 Added. 

The Grand Consolation for two-year-olds, 
foals of 1900. Non-winners of $5,000 at time of 
starting. To close and name February 15th. 1902, 
at flu each. If not declared by June 1st, 1902, to 
pay $25 each. If not declared by September 1st, 
MM, to pay $50 each. If not declared by November 
1st, 1904, to pay $100 each. Starters to pay $100 
additional. The Washington Jockey Club to add 
$4,500. Colts to carry 122 lbs., Allies and geldings 
119 lbs. Penalties and allowances. 

The winning of *5,0u0or more shall be equivalent 
to a declaration Seren furlongs. 

THE DIXIE-$1,500 Added. 

The Dixie, for three-year-olds, foals of 1899. non- 
winners of $4,000 in 1901, and non-winners of $3,uoo 
in I9IJ2; at time of starting To close and name 
February 15lh, 1904, at $10 each If not declared 
by June 1st, 1904. to pay $20 each. If not declared 
by September 1st, 1902. to pay $30 each If not 
declared by November 1st, 1902, to pay $10 each. 
Starters to pay $50 each, the Washington Jockey 
Club to add $1,500. Colts to carry 126 lbs . Allies 
and geldings 123 lbs. Penalties and allowances. 

The winning of $3 000>or more shall lie equivalent 
to a declaration. On* mile and threr-qiiurters. 



THE VESTAL— $1,200 Added. 

The Vestal, for three-year-old Allies, foals of 
1K99, non-winners of $2,000 in 1901, and non-winners 
or $3 0011 in 1902 at time of starting. To close and 
name February 15, 1902, at $5 each. If not declared 
by June 1, 1903. to pay (10 each. If not declared 
by September 1, 190.', to pay $15 each. If not de- 
clared by November 1, 1902, to pay $20 each. 
Starters to pay $30 each, the Washington Jockey 
Club to add $1,200. To carry 123 lbs Penalties 
and allowances. 

The winning of $3,000 or more shall be equivalent 
to a declaration. One mile and u half. 



Autumn Meeting 1 1903. 

THE DIXIE— $2,000 Added. 

The Dixie, for three year-olds, foals of 1900, 
non-winners of $5,000 in 1903 at time of starting. 
To close and name for now two-year-olds on Feb- 
ruary 15, 1902, at $10 each If not declared by 
Jauuury 1, 19113, to pay $20 each. If not declared 
by June 1, 1903, to pay $10 each. If not declared 
by September I, !9u3, to pay $60 each. If not de- 
clared by November 1, 1903, to pay $80 each. 
Starters to pay $100 The Washington Jockey 
Club to add $4,000. Colts to carry 126 lbs , Allies 
and geldings 181 lbs. Penaltiesand allowances. 

The winning of $5000 or more in 1903 to be 
equivalent to a declaration, tine mile and three- 
quarters. 

THE VESTAL-$I,500 Added. 

The Vestal, for three-year-old Allies, foals of 
1900 non-winners of $5,000 in 1903, at time of start- 
ing. To close and name for now two-year-olds on 
February 15, 1902, at $5 each. If not declared by 
January 1, 1903, to pay $15 each. If not declared 
by June 1, 1903, to pay $25 each If not declared 
by September I, 1903, to pay $40 each If not de- 
clared by November 1, 1903, to pay $60 each. 
Starters to pay $75 each The Washington Jockey 
Club to add $1,500. To carry 123 lbs. Penalties 
and allowances. 

The winning of $5,000 or more in 1903, to be 
equivalent to a declaration One mile and a half. 

NOTICE. 

Entries for the above are received only and under the conditions as printed, and in all respects 
subject to and in accordance with the rules of The Jockey Club and Washington Jockey Club. 

For entry blanks and informatfon address the Breeder and Sportsman, 36 Geary Street, San 
Francisco, Cal. 



THE 



HANDICAP-$2,50O 



PLAINS 

Added 

The White Plains Handicap, for two-year- 
olds, by subscription of $50 each, if entered 
February 15, 1902, half forfeit, or$10 only if declared 
August 15, 1902, or, if entered August 15, 1902, when 
the event shall be closed at $100 each, $50 forfeit. 
With $2,500 added. Th* Eclipse Course. 

For Three=Year=0lds. 

THE JEROME HANDICAP— $2,000 Added. 
The Jerome Handicap, for three-year olds, if 
entered February 15, 1904, by subscription of $50 
each, half forfeit, only $10 if declared by August 
15, 1904, or. if entered August 15. 1902, when the 
event shall close. $100 each, half forfeit, with $2,000 
added. Mile and a quarter orer the hill. 

For Three- Year=0lds and Upward. 

THE MUNICIPAL HANDICAP — $2,500 Added. 

The Municipal Handicap, for three-year-olds 
and upward. If entered February 15, 1902, by sub 



subscription of $10 each if made on or before scrl ption of $50 each, $25 forfeit, or *I0 only if 
? ub F, u ?. ry ,^:-. I903 i of *20 each if made on „r before declared by August 15. I9i>2; if entered bv August 
A . pr " lb \£S*' a S° *•» e- 1 '*" made , on or b «' ore I 15, 1902, when the 6TMM shall close, at IUX each, 



May 1, 1902, when subscribers must name their 
horses or pay forfeit. The Westchester Racing 
Association to add $250 in plate and $750 in cash. 
Starters to pay $50 additional. To be ridden by 
gentlemen riders qualiAed under the rules of the 
National Steeplechase and Hunt Association 
The Withers Mile. 

Steeplechases and Hurdle Races. 

ST. NICHOLAS HURDLE RACE— $600 Added. 

St. Nicholas Hurdle Race, at 10 lbs. under 
the scale, for four-year-olds and upward, by sub- 
scription of $10 each, starters to pay $15 additional. 
The Westchester Association to add $600 Mile 
and a half orer six flight of hurdles. 



half forfeit. With $2,500 added. Mile and three 
quarters over the /till. 

MORRIS PARK AUTUMN WEIGHT FOR AGE 
RACE— $3,000 Added. 
The Morris Park Autumn Weight kor Age 
Race for three-year-olds and upward If entered 
February 15, 1902, by subscription of $50 each, $25 
forfeit, or only $10 if declared by August 15, 1902, if 
entered August 15, 1902, when the event shall close 
at $100 each, half forfeit. With $3,000 added and 
the Woodlawn Vase, value $1,000. 

Present Holder ok the Vase F. C. McLewee 
& Co.. with the four-year-old be Gold Heels by 
The Bard, dam. Heel and Toe. 

Two miles and a quarter, Withers Course 

NOTICE. 

Entries for the above received only and under the conditions as printed, and in all respects sub- 
ject to and in accordance with tha rules of The Jockey Club, National Steeplechase and Hunt Asso- 
ciation, and Westchester Racing Association. 

For entry blanks and information address the Breeder and Sportsman, 36 Geary Street, San 
Francisco, Cal. 



California State Agricultural Society, 

SACRAMENTO, CAL. 

SPECIAL HARNESS STALLION STAKE FOR 1905 

For the Get of Stallions that made Private or Public Service, 
Season of 1901, for their Foals of 1902. 

To Close Feb 15, 1902. 

The Race to be contested at State Fair at Sacramento 
in I905, when Foals are three years old 

Entrance fee for stallions to be the price that they made public service during the season of 1901. 
All other stallions that did not make public service, entrance fee to be *20. Stallions to be named 
with the Secretary, February 15, 1904. 

All foals that are the get of any Btallion entered in this stake to be eligible to be entered on June 
1,1903 Entrance fee $50 each, of which $5 must accompany the entry, with breeding and name, if 
any, of foal, and a further payment of $10 March 1 1904, and a further payment of $15 each May I, 
1905, and a Anal payment of $40 on the Arst day of August, 1905, and all colts making this payment 
shall be eligible to start. Starters to be named in writing through the entry box 4 p. m. day before 
the race. 

The California State Agricultural Society to add an amount equal to all moneys paid In by the 
nominators of the stallions, not to exceed one thousand dollars. 

Entrance moneys paid in for stallions and added moneys shall be divided 60% to the end for 
trotting colts and 40% to the end for pacing colts. No nominator allowed to start more than one colt 
in either end. 

The nominator of any colts shall on May 1, 1905. then declare as to the trotting or pacing end he 
desires to start his colts All moneys paid in on colts transferred to the pacing division shall be 
segregated and placed to the credit of the pacing stake, and all other payments shall be placed to the 
credit of the trotting stake. 

All payments not made as they become due declares entry out and releases subscriber from 
further liability. 

Hopples barred in both classes Mile heats, three In flvo. 

Nominator of the sires of the winning colts in each end to receive $450, to be deducted from the 
money added by the Society and the money paid In as entrance on stallions, balance of the stakes 
and added money to be divided 50, 25, 15 and 10%. 

Right reserved to declare two starters a walk-over, for stakes paid in only. 

When only two start they may contest for all entrance money paid in, not heretofore provided for, 
to be divided per cent to the winner and 33S percent to the second horse. A horse distancing the 
Aeld in either class shall be entitled to all moneys paid in and 25% only of the money added by the 
Society, not heretofore provided for. 

Open to all stallions that have made private or public service in any of the following States: 
California. Oregon. Washington, Montana, Idaho, Colorado, Wyoming, Utah, Nevada and Arizona 
during the season of 1901. 

No entry will be accepted except under this condition: That all disputes that may arise In 
regard to the conditions or contest of this race, shall be settled by the Board of Directors of the Cali- 
fornia State Agricultural Society, or those whom they may appoint, and their decision shall be final. 



Remember the date of Closing for Stallions is FEBRUARY 15, 1902. 

GEO. W. JACKSON, A. B. SPRECKELS. 

Secretary. President. 

Office— New Pavllon, Sacramento. 



Pedigrees Tabulated 



and type written ready for framing 
Write for prioes. Breeder and 
portsman, 36 Geary street, San Francisco, Cal. 



February 1, 1902] 



13 



Racing! Racing! Racing! 



Now California Jockey CI 

Season 1901-1902 

OAKLAND RACE TR\CK 

Racing MONDAY, TUESDAY, WEDNESDAY 
THURSDAY, FRIDAY and SATURDAY 
RAIN OR SHINE. 
Five or More Races Each Day. 

Races start at 2: 15 p. m. sharp. 

Ferry boats leave San Francisco at 12 m , 12:30, 
1:00, 1:30, 2:00, 3:00 p. m., connecting with trains 
stopping at the entrance to the track. Last two 
cars on train reserved for ladies and their escorts. 
No smoking. Buy your ferry tickets to Shell 
Mound. All trains via Oakland mole connect with 
San Pablo avenue electric cars at Seventh and 
Broadway, Oakland; also all trains via Alameda 
mole connect with San Pablo avenue cars at 
Fourteenth and Broadway, Oakland These elec- 
tric cars go direct to the track in fifteen minutes. 

Returning trains leave the track at 4:15 and 4:45 
p. m. and immediately after the last race. 

THOS. It. WILLIAMS Jr., Pres. 
CHAS F. PRICE, Sec'y and Mgr. 

J. GOLDSTEIN 
343 Third Street 

PAYS THE HIGHEST PRICES for Gentle 
men's good Cast-off Clothing. Give him a trial. 



Percheron Stallions 

FOR SALE. 

NativA <snn foaled April 28. 1897. He Is a 
alive ouii, handsome black with brown 
points and was sired bv Raglan, 1st dam by 
Adolph, 2d dam by imp. Weinort, 3d dam by imp 
French Spy. Native Son is one of the most prom- 
ising young draft stallions in California, and is 
a sure foal getter. He was bred to 23 mares last 
year and 21 of them are in foal. His six year 
old brother weighs 2060 pounds, and Native Son 
will be as large at the same age. 

Chief of Kneiphusen. ^ h SS! 

lion bred by Joseph Blondin or Livermore. Ala- 
meda Co , was sired by Raglan. First dam by 
Starlight, 2d dam by Adolph. 3d dam by French 
Spy. Raglan No 14,739 was imported from France 
by Theo. Skillman Raglan was bred by Joseph 
Davignon of Graucterie Department of Orue. 
Three of Raglan's colts were shown in Livermore 
on the 24th of February, 1900 and their average 
weight was 1P56 pounds. Chief Kneiphusen was 
foaled March 5, 1897, and took the first prize in the 
San Francisco and San Mateo Horse Show in 
Tanforan Park. He has been bred to 52 mares and 
got 48 in foal. His colts can be seen at Livermore 
and at Redwood City When he is full grown he 
will weigh over 2100 pounds. 
For further particulars apply to or address 
H. B GOECKEN, 
Hay, Grain and Feed Merchant, 
585-605 Fourth St., San Francisco. 



FOR SALE. 

RENT'S DRIVING MARE. AGE 6: COLOR 
Brown: height 16 hands: weight 1100: stand- 
ard bred: no mark: sired by Nushagak 25,939 at 
McLaughlin Ranch. Los Banos; trotting gait; 
thoroughly broke, kind and gentle; can trot very 
fast. Apply to 

NEVADA STABLES, 
1350 Market St., S. F. 



WANTED— TEAM OF MARES. 

f (REAM COLOR OR GOLDEN SORREL PRE- 
ferred. Must be stylish, well broken and 
speedy, perfectly sound and gentle, free from all 
vices. Give price and full particulars. Address 
A. A., care of Brebdkk and Sportsman, 36 Geary 
Street, San Francisco 

WANTED— A SINGLE FOOTER. 

MARE PREFERRED. PERFECTLY SOUND 
and gentle, free from all vices. Must be good 
size, very fast and easy; well broken to single foot. 
State price and full particulars. Address H L , 
care of Bkeedkk and Sportsman, 36 Geary 
Street, San Francisco. 



WANTED— A DRIVING MARE. 

MUST BE GOOD SIZE, WELL BROKEN AND 
speedy, perfectly sound and gentle, free from 
all vices. State price and full particulars Ad- 
dress B. L., care of Breeder and Sportsman, 36 
Geary Street, San Francisco. 




ONE 

Tablet 
LEG AND BODY WASH 

For Fevered Legs, inflamed tendons, 
sprained ankles, cracked heels and all skin 
eruptions. Will not blister or affect the kldney3 
Unexcelled as a brace. 
The most effective, 
Themost economical 
The most convenient 

One tablet furnishes more genuine WltchHa- 
zel than is contained in 40 gallons of the best 
extract, besides possessing other valuable in- 
gredients in its makeup. 

Put up in metal boxes in two sizes. 
Regular or $2 size contains 120 tablets. 8 
boxes for $1(5. Small or $1 size contains 
50 tablets. 6 boxes for $5. 

Sent post-paid on receipt of price. 
BOYCE TABLET CO., TERRE HAUTE, IND 
for Bale by Druggists and Dealers in Harness & Turf Goods. 



fLlNIME.NI 




VETERINARY. 



Question 



NO LONGER. 

Chronic Scratches 
and Grease Heel. .. 

Can be cured absolutely and permanently. 

VETERINARY PIXINE 



in its efficiency is a revelation. The highest trib- 
utes that can le paid are given to It as a cure for 
chronic and hopeless cases of Scratches, Sores and 
Skin Affections on horses and domestic animals 
Sold under an absolute guarantee. Money back 
if it fails. 

2oz,25c; 8 oz , 50c; 5-lb. pkg., $4 

At all Druggists and Dealers, or sont prepaid 

A. W.TlTfT CO. 

PACIFIC COAST AOENTS, 

S19 mission St., San Francisco, Cal 

Troy Chemical Co., Manufacturers. Troy, N. Y. 



Ira Barker Dalziel 

VETERINARY DENTIST 

Fancy Carriage. Saddle and Road Horses for Sale 

Office and stablo: 006 Golden Gate Avenue, San 
Francisco, Cal. Telephone South AM. 



IDr*. W XXI, F*. X- gnu . 

M R. C. V. S., F. E. V. M. S. 

VETERINARY SURGKON. 

Member of the Royal College of Veterinary 
Surgeons, England; Fellow of the Edlnburg 
Veterinary Medical Society; Graduate of the New 
Veterinary College, Edinburgh; Veterinary Sur- 
geon to the S. F. Fire Department; Live Stock 
Inspector forNew Zeal and and Australian Colonics 
at the port of San Francisco: Professor of Equine 
Medicine, Veterinary Surgery, Veterinary Depart- 
ment University of California: Ex-President of 
I the California State Veterinary Medical Assoc ia- 
' tion; Veterinary Infirmary, Residence and Office, 
San Francisco Veterinary Hospital. 1117 Golden 
Gate Avenue, near Webster St., San Francisco: 
Telephone West 128. 



132,000 Deaths from 
this alone. 

One special danger menaces those who 
live well, who can use champagne and tine 
liquors, and that is Bright'.-, Disease. 
Posted clubmen understand this so well 
that many have tests made every few 
months Others drink nothing but dry 
wines. But still the deaths reported from 
Bright's Disease and Dabetes are increas- 
ing at a fearful rate Tlie last census re- 
ports show that since 1890 the increase has 
been nearly fifty per cent and that the 
deaths in the United Slates alone from 
above causes and diseases growing out of 
them last year reached the enormous num- 
ber of 132 000 

Hence the importance of every clubman 
knowing thisone fact, viz.: That Bright's 
Disease and Diabetes are now positively 
curable in about 87% of all case-. The 
Fulton Compounds are now saving the 
lives of hundreds, and will, when better 
known, save the lives of thousands who 
are now with little hope. 

Send for full descriptive pamphlets to 

John J. Fulton Co. 

430 Montgomery St , 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL,. 



ADDnal Clearance sale 

Ladies' Suits, 

Cloaks, Jackets, 

Capes and Waists 

At Tremendous Reductions. 

J. O'BRIEN & CO. 

I 144 Market Street. 



C3COANUT OIL CAKE 

THE H EST FKKI> FOR 

STOCK, CHICKENS AND PIGS 

For Rale In lots to null by 

EL DORADO LINSEED OIL WORKS CO. 

08 California 8tr«nt>. San FranoUon. Cal, 



Chronic Bronchitis and Catarrh ol the Bladder 

Cured In 4K ii 



i 



CAPSULES 



F 



Superior to Copaiba, Cubebit or Injection 



BREEDERS' DIRECTORY. 



HOI.STKINS- Winners of every 7 days' butter 
contest at State Fair 1899 1st & 2d foraged cows, 
4-yr , 3-yr. and 2-yr -olds: 21 Jerseys and Durhams 
competing, ftth year my Holsteins have boaten 
Jerseys for butter. Stock for sale: also pigs. F. 
H Burke, B2B Market St.. S. F. 



VKKIIA HIIFNA .1 KKSF.YS— The best A.J 
C. C. registered prize herd is owned by Henrj 
Pierce, San Francisco Animals for sale. 



.1 KKSKVS, HOI.S I KINS AND DITKHAMS. 

Dairy Stock specially. Hogs, Poultry. Estab- 
lished 1876. William Niles & Co. Los Angeles, 
Cal. 



AYRSIIIRES— Young Bulls. Cows and Heifers. 
Registered. From prize winning families. 
SHORTHORNS— Of the famous Golden Drop 
family. All stock registered and sold on both 
blood lines and individuality. Brown & Brandon, 
Petaluma, Cal. 



SUNSET 
LIMITED 



One of the most magnificent 
•trains ever built. For 1001-1902 
tri-weekly via Coast Line and 
Sunset Route for 

NEW ORLEANS and 
NkW YORK 

Leave SAN FRANCISCO 4:50 p m. 

Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays 

Leave LOS ANOELES 8:30 a m. 

Tuesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays 

Arrive NEW ORLEANS 7:20 p m. 

Thursdays, Saturdays. Mondays 



Amonj; the world's noted High- 
ways of Travel not one equals 
the route of this train. 
Get the little book, " Wayside 
Notes," from any agent of the 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC 

Initial trip of Sunset Limited 
Friday, Dec. 6, from San Francisco 



ABSORBINE, JR., 

Will remove the 
soreness from a 

C^BUNION 



And gradually absorb the bunch. 
Also unequalled in removing any 
bunch or bruise. Pleasant to use, 
nicely perfumed. 

S> I .OO P er bottle, by mail. 
MANUFACTuni:n by 

W. F. YOUNG, P. D. F., 

SPRINGFIELD, • • MASS. 

For sale by Mack A Co., Langley & Michaels Co 
Redlngton A Co . J. O'Kane, and J. A. McKerrou 
all of San Francisco. 




BUSINESS COLLEGE 
24 Post Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Tho oldest, the largest, the most popular com 
merclal school on the Pacific Coast. 18,(100 gradu- 
ates: 25 teachers: DO typewriters; over 300 students 
annually plaoed In positions. Send for oatalogue. 

B. P.BIALD, Proildcn 



KENNEL ADVERTISEMENTS 



FOX TERRIERS AT STUD. 

' luu . r: K (c*i»f<>rd Dora 

Stud, fee 110. 

WANDEE JESTER;-;-- r» P 

Stud tee, $5. 

WANDEE BE BE{S^&S£-« 

Stud fee, IS. 

PUPPIES AND BROOD BITCHES FOR SALE 

For particulars address 

Wandee Kennels 

hii ii LRRISON st , s. F. 



Ill 



(The World's Champion Bull Terrier) 

AT STUD 



Apply to 



L. A. KLEIN 

2570 <;<-nry St., San Franclmo 



AT STUD 

CUBA OF KENWOOD 

(Qlenbeigh Jr.— Stella) 
SAM'S BOW 

(Plain Sam— D)lly Dee II) 

STOCKDALE KENNELS 

K. M. DODGK, Manager, 
Kakeraflpld , Kprn Co., 

Boarding. Pointer Puppies and well-broken 

Dogs for sale. 



Dog Diseases 



O ~\J*7~ to ~F* G o d 

Mailed Free to any address by tho 
author, H. Clay Glover, D. v. S., 
1278 Broadway, New York. 




ED - DOGS WITH MANGE 

■no cum Ttitn with sianoakdoiiof tar. 

nd for cm* i tin s tr miicim.., A*t>rwi .\Ainr 

■STANDARD DPSISin IVNTCO Clr.rljsnW r 



Mark Levy & Co. 



MARK LEVY 
Expert Cutler 
and Fitter... 
Fine Suili 
from 

$25.00 up 




Only Ihc 
Bcil Help 
Employed... 
All work 
done on the 
premtjei 



36 Geery St.. $. F. Roomj 19-20 Phone Cnnt 158 



H. F. LORQUIN 

TAXTDEB MIST 
Dealer In Naturalists' Supplies 

SCIENTIFIC MOUNTINO OK HIRDS, RUGS, 
^ Heads, Animals, Fishes, Reptiles, Inseota 

31 !> Kearny St. (upstairs) San Franrlnco. 

Phone, Illaclt 53.12 



FIELD, 

HOG 

FENCE 



WIRE 



GOODS 

NETTING 

FENCING 



West Coast Wire and Iron Works 

17-1U Fremont St., S»n FranclHco, Cal 




. , . Ihe only ENCHILaDS! 

Richelieu (afe maV-J 




Junction € 



BLAKE, M0FFITT & T0WNE 



I ' I I, KltS IN- 



66-67-60-61 First Street, 8. V 

Telephone Main liio. 



14 



[February 1, lu>2 




THE BAYWOOD STUD 

THE BUNGALOW, SAN MATEO, CAL 

(Property of John Parrott, Esq.) 

Imp. Hackney Stallion 

GREEN'S RUFUS 63 ■«*«> 

Will serve a limited number or Approved Mares, Season 10O2. 

FEE " " $75 

Reductions made for two or more mares. 



HERE'S AN OPPORTUNITY 

STANDARD BRED 
MARES AND FILLIES 

FROM $40 UP. 

Many of Them are Registered and Nearly All Can Be. 
Write for Prices and Particulars. 

The owner, HON. JESSE D. CARR, Salinas, wants to sell thein immediately. 
Is not in need of the money, but is getting too old (87) to keep on breeding Horses. 
Will sell one or more and will give any one a big bargain that will take them all 
This is the best opportunity ever offered in California to get big values for money 



Almeda C— Brown Ally, foaled January, 1893. 

Sire, Gabilan; dam, Emma. Registered in 

Vol. 13, Rule 7, as standard. Bred to Boodle J r. 
Delight— Bay Ally, foaled February 15. 1897. Sire, 

Euglneer; dam, Flossie. No marks. Bred to 

Boodle Jr. 

Bertb»— Dark brown mare. Sire, Carr's Mam- 
brlno; dam, Emma. Has not foaled yet. 

Bell*- Black Ally, foaled March 20, 1893. Sire, 
Alpbeus Wilkes; dara, Lady Nelson. Bred to 
Boodle Jr. 

Trix— Black Ally, foaled April 20, 1899. Sire, Ecce; 
dam, Belle. 

Necessity— Light bay Ally, foaled February 22, 

1897. Sim, Magonta; dam. Unique. 
Dora— Bay Ally, foaled April 2, 1890. Sire, Reno; 

dam, Martha. Bred to Major 
Epha-Bay Ally, foaled April 24. 1892. Sire, Eugi- 

neer; dam, Puss. Registered in Vol. XIII. 

Bred to Boodle Jr. 
Elsie— Light bay Ally, foaled March 25, 1895. Sire. 

Boodle; dam, Mary C. Bred to Nutwood 

Wilkes. 

Eda— Chestnut sorrel Ally, foaled April 19, 1895. 
Sire, Hambletonian Wilkes; dam, Gabilan 
Maid. Bred to Boodle Jr. 

Flossie— Brown mare. Sire, Carr's Mambrino; 
dam, Gray Eagle mare brought from Ken- 
tucky. Vol. XIII. Bred to Boodle Jr. 

Gabilan Girl— Brown Ally foaled April 8, 1892. 
Sire, Gabilan; dam, Clara. Vol. Xin. Bred 
to Major 

Queen Bess-Brown Ally, foaled April 3, 1900. 

Sire, Boodle Ir.; dam, Gabilan Girl. 
Little Ora— Brown Ally, foaled March 17, 1897 

Sire, Eugineer; dam Lilly B. 
Jane— Bay mare. Sire, Carr's Mambrino; dam 

Ballot Box. Bred to Major 
Juanlta Bay Ally, foaled March 26, 1896. Sire, 

Bay Rum; dam Luoky Girl. Bred to Boodle Jr. 
ltty 8.-Sorrel Ally, foaled April 22, 1900. Sire, 

Nutwood Wilkes; dam, Flossie. 
Flora— Bay Ally, foaled February 24, 1892. Sire, 

Reno; dam, Lady Palmer. Bred to Major. 
Fanchon— Bay Ally, foaled April 13, 1898. Sire, 

Eoce: dam, Jane. 
Lady Palmer— Bay mare. Sire, Carr's Mam- 
brino; Arst dam by Luciona, he by Whipple 

Hambletonian. Vol. XIII , Rule, 7. Bred to 

Major. 

Lildlne- Bay Ally, foaled March 28, 1894. Sire, 

Boodle; dam Gabilan Maid. Vol. XIII., Rule, 

VI. Bred to Nutwood Wilkes. 
AUegra— Bay Ally, foaled April 27, 1899. Sire, 

Ecce; dam Jane. 
Martha— Bay mare. Sire, Mambrino Jr.; dam, 

Gabilan Maid. Bred to Major. 



Lilly B —Black mare (16 hands). Sire, Homer 

dam, Maggie Lee Registered as standard in 

Vol VI. Bred to Major 
Lucky Girl— Bay Ally, foaled May 24, 1889 Sire, 

Carr's Mambrino; dam, Flossie. Bred to 

Boodle Jr. 

Miss Judy— Bay Ally, foaled April 4, 1900 Sire, 

Boodle Jr.; dam, Jane. 
Nancy— Bay mare. Sire. Mambrino Jr.; dam, 

Gabilan Maid. Bred to Boodle Jr. 
Peerless— Bay Ally, foaled April 5. 1891. Sire, 

Gabilan; dam, Jane. Bred to Major. 
Comfort— Brown Ally, foaled May 25, 1898. Sire, 

Magenta; dam Janet. 
Surprise- Brown mare. Sire, Abbotsford, son of 

Woodford Mambrino; Arst dam, Minnie by 

Ladd's Kentucky Hunter. Bred to Boodle Jr. 
Sausal Maid— Dark brown Allv, foaled January 8. 

1892. Sire, Gabilan; dam, Flossie. Vol. Xill, 

Rule VI. Bred to Boodle Jr. 
Taddle J.- Sorrel Ally, foaled April 2, 1896 Sire, 

Bay Rum; dam, Mary C. Bred to Boodle Jr. 
Mary C— Bay mare, foaled April 8, 1898. Sire, 

Antovolo 7648; dam, Gabilan Maid. Bred to 

Boodle Jr. 

Ruby M.— Bay Ally, foaled March 28, 1898. Sire, 

Ecce; dam, Flora. 
Jenny Wren— Bay Ally, foaled April 21, 1900. 

Sire, Boodle Jr,; dam, Flora. 
Claire— Bay Ally, foaled May 10, 1899. Sire, Punch; 

dam. Lady St. Clair 
Beatrice Golden— Chestnut sorrel Allv, foaled 

April 20, 1900. Sire, Boodle Jr.: dam, Lady 

Comstock Jr. 
Ontario-Bay Ally, foaled April 21, 1898. Sire, 

Magenta; dam, Lucky Girl. 
Miss Nobody— Gray Ally, foaled March 26, 1897. 

Sire, Magenta: dam, Martha. 
Julia Dean— Bay Ally, foaled April 13, 1898. Sire, 

Ecce; dam, Martha. 
Pobreclta— Black Ally, foaled April 9, 1900. Sire, 

Boodle Jr.; dam, Martha. 
Helen Gould— Bay Ally, foaled March 29, 1900. 

Sire, Boodle Jr.; dam. Miss Beauty. 
Miss Nan— Dark gray Ally, foaled March 6, 1897. 

Sire, Magenta; dam, Nancy. 
Delta— Dark bay filly, foaled Match 21, 1900. Sire, 

Boodle Jr.; dam, Nancy. 
Queen Mab— Sorrel Ally, foaled April 11, 1900. 

Sire, Nutwood Wilkes; dam, Nina B. 
Little Dorrlt— Gray Ally, foaled March 14, 1897. 

Sire, Magenta; dam, Rita V. 
Adelaide— Dark gray Ally, foaled February 20, 

1897. Sire, Magenta, dam, Surprise. 
Evening Star— Black Ally, foaled March 28, 1898. 

Sire, Magenta: dam, Sausal Maid. 



Address JESSE D. GARB. Salinas, Gal. 



ASTHM A CUR E FREE! 

Asthmalene Brings Instant Relief and Permanent 
Cure in AH Cases. 
Sent Absolutely Free on Receipt of Postal. 



i crlA'NED . 
TOR. TEN 
TEARS 



There is nothing like Asthmalene. It brings 
instant relief, even in the worst cases. It cures 
when all else fails. 

The Rev. C. F. WELLS, of Villa Ridge, 111., says: "Your 
trial bottle of Asthmalene received in good condition. I can- 
not tell you how thankful I feel for the good derived from it. 
I was a slave, chained with putrid sore throat and asthma for 
ten years. I despaired of ever being cured. I saw your ad- 
vertisement for the cure of this dreadful and tormenting dis- 
ease, asthma, and thought you had overspoken yourselves, 
but resolved to give it a trial. To my astonishment the trial 
acted like a charm. Send me a full-size bottle " 

We want to send to every sufferer a trial treatment of 
Asthmalene, similar to the one that cured Mr. Wells. We'll 
send it by mail POSTPAID, ABSOLUTELY FREE OF 
CHARGE, to any sufferer who will write for it, even on a postal. Never mind, 
though you are despairing, however bad your case, Asthmalene will relieve and 
cure The worse your case, the more glad we are to send it. Do not delay. 
Write at once, addressing DR. TAFT BROS.' MEDICINE CO., 79 East 130th St., 
N. Y. City. Sold by all Druggists. 




2*012 HOW CAN YOU BEAT IT O'CkO^ 

FOR THE MONEY? £..\J 

STAM B. 23444 

RECOltD S:ilW. By STAMBOl'L 5101, a trotting and show king; dam. Belle Medium 2:20 a 
great brood mare by Happy Medium, sire of the great all round mare, Nancy Hanks 2:04, and other 
greatones; second dam by the hannsonie sire Almont Lightning (sire of the dam of Zombro2'll and 
other great all-in-all animals, both on the turf and in the show rings; third dam by that sire of game 
sound, handsome animals, Mambrino Patchcn 58; fourth dam bv that speed producing sire, Manibrlno 
Chief 11: Hfth dam by that stylish and long distance racing horse. Mason's Whip. 

STAM B. is a fine and substanaial upstanding bay, 15.3 hands tall, weighs I KM) pounds, and now 
rightly ranks among the most promising young sires of the laud. That he is now in public service in 
California is a fact for which breeders may be grateful. He is already proving a sire of speed and 
gameness, together with size, superb style and high action, transmitting these qualities to every foal 
regardlessof dam. He is acknowledged by all who have seen him to be very near the real and'ideal 
race horse and all-around sire His racing qualities were beyond criticism, and all close observers 
know that in his blood are represented the kings and queens of the trotting turf and show rings. 

Payable at the end of June, with return privilege. 
Heduced rates to any one person breeding over three 
Freight must be prepaid on all mares Season com- 
No responsibility assumed for accidents or escapes. 



Terms for the Season, $40. 

mares. Pasturage for mares, H per month, 
mences February 1st and ends August 1, 1902. 
Address 

P. O. Box 121. 



2:04 



SAJU H.i. GAMBLE, Pleaaanton, CaL 



2:08 




NEIL W. 30371 

By <;uv WILKES, dam VERONICA 2:20 
by Alcona 730; second dam, Fontana (dam of Silas 
Skinner 2:1". Flora Belle 2:25, etc.) by Almont 33; 
next dam Fanny Williams by Abdallah 15; 
next dam by Denmark, thoroughbred, 

WILL HAKE THE SEASON AT 

SANTA ROSA STABLES, 

SANTA BARBARA 



For particulars address 

H. W. EL VAIL, Santa ItHrlmrn. 



TERMS: $25 FOR THE SEASON. 



Return Privileges. 



88TSPEED AND ABILITY TO REPRODUCE IT. 

DIABLO 2:09 1-4 

SIRE OF 

CLIPPER 2:06 
SIR ALBERT S 2:08, 
DIODINE 2:10! 

Daedalion 2:11, Diawood2:ll, Tags2:ll!i, Hijo del Diablo 2:11'/!. El Diablo 2: 12' 4 , Inferno 2: IS 
i ialf Topsail 2:lti'L N. L. li. (2) 2:21" 2 . Imp 2:22',, Rey del Diablo (2) &SS%, Diablilo 
2:2I!4, luferna 2:24"4, Miramonte 2:24'L Athablo 2:24'/5, Hazel D 2:24'',. 

Sire i Much Better 2:07'^ I Dam /Diablo 2:01", 

Derby Princess 2:08'/U I Elf -l:\2K 

CHARLES DERBY 2:20 , 1 ; ii "> 1 " *'«'« I BERTHA by Alcantara- Don Derby 2 is* 

I Owyhee 2:11 j Ed LalTertr 2:16' . 

Sire of \ and 18 more in 2:30 Dam of I Jay Eft Bee (2) . 2:2«'; 

Will make I lie Season of 11)02 at 

WOODLAND, CALIFORNIA, TERMS FOR THE SEASON, - $50 

Good Pasiurage at $2.50 per month Best of care taken, but no responsibility assumed for accident 
or escapes. Address 

WILLIAM MURRAY, Woodland, Cal, 



Mondeso! 



| Sire >lt KINNEY 2:1 1 > 4 

Sire of 

111 In 2:15 and 28 in 2:20 list 



| Dam WO (registered) bv Antevolo 2:19 Secoud dam, 
Daisy May by Nutwood 500. Third dam, Ral- 
ston Mare by Alexander's Abdallah. 
MONDESOL, 4 years old, stands \f>\ hai:ds, weighs abont IKK) pounds; is the best bred young 
McKinney stallion, combining as he does the blood of Electioneer and Nutwood with that of the 
greastest son of the great Alcyone. He is in every respect a splendid individual and should be seen 
by every owner of a good mare in this State before booking elsewhere. 

S>40 for the Season, with return privilege. 



Young Venture 

by Talcott's imp. Flying Morgan, son of Old Flying Morgan. Y'OINt; YENTURE carries more of 
that great Herod Eclipse blood than any other trotting stallion in the world. That is the thorough- 
bred combination which crosses so well with the Hambletonian strains and produces the greatest 
harness horses on the track. 

1925 for the Season, with return privilege 

The above Stallions will stand at ROCKRIDGE FARM, 
Broadway, near 63d St., Oakland. 



Sire VENTURE, sire of dam of 
Directum 2:05m, Adonts2:ll 1 ., Cupid 
218(sireof Venus II 2:11*. Psyche 
2:lt>«and Lottie Parks 2:lli 3 4 ) and 
dam of Sidney Dillon, sire of Dolly 
Dillon 2:1)7, etc. 

Dam by Davis' Belmont, thorough- 
bred son of Belmont. Second dam 



I'. O. Box 37 



I' mm ii.it Cal 



ALCYO 22^, 



S A Great Son of the 
:10 ( GREAT ALCYONE 



Dam, the great brood mare LOl'lSE (dam of 3 in the list) by Sunshine, out of a daughter o, 

Edwin Forrest 43, sire of the clam of Mambrino King, the sire of Lord Derby 2:0fi'i. Nightingale 2:08 
Dare Devil 2:09, Heir-at-Law 2:05^. Lady of the Manor 2:04'4. Moonstone 2:09. etc., etc. 

ALCYO 2:10 is the sire of Lady Alcy— yearling record 2:37; 2 y. o .2:19*: 4 y. o , 2:13)<— and 10 
more in the 2:30 list. He is not onlya great racehorse, getting his record, 2:10, in a fourth heat, but 
he is a grand individual of rare finish, gentle disposition, best of legs and feet and his get are all of 
good size, good looks and extreme speed He is a hay horso 15^4 hands, weighs 1050 pounds and is 
standard by breeding, performance and produce. 



PISTOL 



Reg. No. S 

28884 ( 



Sire LANCELOT 2:2:1, sire of 10 in 
2:30, which is more than his half 
brother. Eleetioneer.had at same age 
Dam PEPEROMIA by Alcantara. 
PISTOL 28884, five years old, solid black 15.2'i hands, weighs 1075 pounds. One of the hand- 
somest and best individuals ever brought to California. He is a remarkably well turned horse gentle 
disposition, rare intelligence and possesses extreme speed. His colts are universally black, good size, 
extra good limbs and stylish. He has only one colt that is 2 years old. and they all show great speed 

The above horses will make the Season of 1902 from February 1st, at the 

RAGE TRACK. SAN JOSE. 

— ff A f\ /"\ f<»' I'"' season, with usual return privileges, or right reserved 

| ERINtIS 5piV/U to return service fee. All bills must be paid before mare ia removed. 
Best of care taken, but no responsibility assumed for accidents or escapes. Excellent pasturage 
at *4 per month (no barbed wire) or kept up and fed grain at reasonable rates. 
Both of these horses are sure foal getters. For further particulars address 

B. S. KREHE. San Jose, Cal. 



FEBRUARY 1, l!H'2| 



15 



Bonnie Direct 2:054 



_4 

World's Record for Pacers in First 
Season's Campaign. 

Winner of fastest 5-heat race paced in 1900. Win- 
ner of Chamber of Commerce Stake at Detroit: 
Blue Hill Stake at Readville, and three other 
great races. Biggest money winner of " New " 
Pacersof 1900, having $7 ,575 tohiscredit the first 
year out. 

Sired by Direct 2:054, Sire of Directly 2:03). 
Directum Kelly 2:08}. Etc. 

Dam BON BON 2:26 (dam of Bonsilene 2:\4H), 
by Simmons 2:28, sire of Helen Simmons 2:11^, 
New York Central 2- 13, etc. Also sire of dams of 
Owyhee 2:11. and Fereno iSHHK, as a three-year- 
old, and winner of last season's (1900) Kentucky- 
Futurity 

Second Dam BONNIE WILKES 2:29, by George 
Wilkes 2:22. 

Third Dam BETTY VILEY, by Bob Johnson, 
thoroughbred son of Boston. 

is a black stallion. i:>> 4 hands high, weighs 1IUO lbs. Is a good individual 
has best of feet and legs, and is absolutely sound in every way. 
BONNIE DIRECT will serve a limited number of approved maros during season of 1902, at BlOO 
the season, with return privilege if mare proves not with foal, and horse is alive and in my possession. 
Money due at time of service or upon removal of mare. Every care taken to prevent accidents or 
escapes, but no responsibility should any occur. Pasturage for mares at reasonable rates. 




BONNIE DIRECT 



Address 



C. L. GRIFFITH, 

PleaBBDtOD, Cb 1 



Summary of Three of Bonnie 
Dlreoi'e Races. 

Chamber of Commerce Stakes. J5.000, at Detroit 

Bonnie Direct 9 5 8 111 

Annie Thornton 14 1 12 2 2 

Hal McEwen 1 II 2 8 4dis 

Pussy Willow 8 3 II 3 3 ro 

George C. 3 4 3 4 5 ro, Cobbett 4 7 4 5 dr. Duchess 
II 13 5 6 dr, Joe Wheeler 12 9 7 7 dr. Fred Wilton 
2 2 9 dis, Mt Clemens Bov 5 6 6 dr. Louis E Mld- 
dleton 6 8 12 dr. Sport 7 10 10 dr. Gamecock 10 12 
dr, Connie 13 dr, Little Frank dis. 

Time— 2:104, 2:12W, 2:I35£, 2:13, 2:12)4, 2:12y. 

2:13 Class, pacing, purse $1,500, at Columbus. 

Bonnie Direct 2 5 111 

Johnny Agan I 1 2 2 3 

Lady Piper 3 2 3 4 2 

Freilmont 5 3 I 3 4 

Red Light 4 4 5 dr, Prince Exum dis. 

Time-0:31. 1:08*4. 1:34, M6Mi 0:33— , 1:054, 1:3KV<, 
2:K>X; 0:32. 1:034, 1:344. 2:07M; 0:314, 1:014, l:37J£, 
2:08^: 0:31*. 1:03^, 1:36. 2:08«. 

Blue Hill Stake, $3,000, at Readville. 

Bonnie Direct 1 I I 

Sallie Hook 2 2 8 

Evolute 5 3 2 

Annie Thornton 4 4 3 

Paul Revore 3 5 4, Dark Wilkes 6 7 5, Tommy 
W. 7 6 7, Argo Director 8 8 6, Lady Allright 9 9 9, 
Beauty Spot dis, P. H. Flynn dis 

fime-2:07^. 2:09^. 2:10J<. 



TRAIN YOUR HORSES 



N 



AT NAPA TRACK. 

O SAFER OR BETTER TRACK IN CALI- 
fornla on which to work and train horses. 
Large, roomy box stalls in first-class condition for 
rent at B) per month. A reduction made in rental 
according to number of stalls taken The best 
climate on earth. Miles of clean, dry roads to jog 
on during rainy season Transportation by oar or 
boat to San Francisco Hay aud grain 'of best 
quality at low prices. Correspond with 

aktih k II. BROWN, Napa, Cal. 



CALIFORNIA 



Photo Engraving Company 



HIGH CLASS ART 



Half Tones anl Line En'/ wring 

Artistic Designing. 
SIS Market Street. San KranrlHco 



French- Draught stallions 

FOR SALE 

HI inn REGISTERED NO 9438. Weigh! 
1IUUU. 1850: bred by J. D. Patterson. Oxnard. 
Cat; foaled April 18, 1898 Sire, Leopold 4250 by 
imp. Louis 3299: dam, Henrietta II 5779 by imp. 
Montebelle 3298; second dam, imp. Lady Henri- 
etta I 2449 

VIA Dill HQ REGISTERED NO 9017. 
JTlAKyUIC;. weight 1800; bred by J D. Pat- 
terson, Oxnard. Cal.: foaled March 25. 1895, Sire, 
imp. Montebelle 3298 by Ca:sar: dam imp Maria 
I 2450 by Hercules. 

These Stallions are tirst-class and their sires 
and dams are among the noted prize-winners in 
Europe. For price and further particulars ad 
dress AMERICAN BEET SUGAR CO, 123Cali- 
fornia Street. San Francisco. 



FOR SALE. 



HANDSOME 3-YEAR-OLD BAY STALLION, 
COMBINATION by Diawood 2:11 dam by 
Wilkesdate 2:29. second dam by Calabar 8559. 
This colt is nicely broken, ha-i Dever been worked 
for speed but shows a wonderful way of going: can 
trot better than a 2:40 clip. Price $225 if sold 
within 30 days. For further particulars address 
T. W. BARSTOW, San Jose, Cal. 



The Highly Bred Stallion 

WILKES DIRECT 2:221 

Full Brother to John A. McKerron 2:06 3-4 to Wagon. 

By NUTWOOD WILKES 2:164. sire of John A McKerron 2:06J£. Who Is It 8U0J<. 
Stanton Wilkes 2:104, Claudius 2: !3"4, Georgie B 2:I2!4, Bob Ingersoll Z:M3K and other 
standard performers 

Dam Ingar (dam of John A McKerron 2:06K, Wilkes Direct 2:224 and Thursday 
2:24) by the old champion Director 2:17. sire of Directum 2:05)4. Direct 2:054, Direction 
2:10m. Evaogeline 2:1 1 \i, Margaret S 2:124 and others: second dam Annie Titus (dam 
of Annie C 2:25) by Echo 462, sire of Echora 2:234 (dam of Direct 2:054) and 16 others 
in list: third dam Tiffany mare (dam of Gibraltar 2:224, sire of Our Dick i:W'4. 
Homestake 2: 14 !^ and others) by Owen Dale, son of Williamson's Belmont. 

WII k'F's FlIRFrT is a dark b ay,153 hands and weighs 1200 pounds: well 
YT 1LIXLO LMI\L,wl formed and of kind disposiiion Will make the season of 
1902 at the stables of T. W. Barstow on the Alameda Avenue 

Near jRace Track, San Jose, Cal. 

FROM FEBRUARY 1st TO .JUNE 1st. 



TERMS, 



$40 THE SEASON. 



Good pasturage $3 per mouth. No wire fencing Every care taken to prevent 
accidents or escapes, but no responsibility should any occur. Address 



Telephone No : West 141. 



T. W. BARSTOW, 

San Jose, Cal. 




WILKES DIRECT 2:22 1=2. 

Full Brother to John A. McKerron 2:00 3-4 



The Thoroughbred Stallions 



SEASON OF 1902. 



Ossary 



[Ben d'Or 



Ormonde 



( Doncaster 
I Rouge Rose 



Breed to the Champion of the World 
McKINNEY 2:111 



i I llv Acnes ' Macaroni 
(lAiy Agnes ( 1>olly Agneg 



„, ( King Tom 

Kingcraft „ ^craft 



I Countcsu LangdenJ 



^ Joysan 



( Adventurer 
| I.ady I.angden 



OSSARY will make the season of 1902 at the Menlo Stock Farm. San Mateo County, Cal.. to 
approved mares only He is a superb animal and undoubtedly the best son of Ormonde in the stud 
(barring, of course, Orme. to whom he yields nothing in appearance and pedigree). 

Terms and particulars on ttppltcation. 



St. Carlo 



St. Blaise 



I Carina. 



Hermit 



i Newmlnater 
( Seclusion 



Marsyas 
esuvlenne 



IS 



f Kingfisher j 



l.i'xington 
Ethmi I.hhb 



(The Ill-Used 
Carlta Camilla 



ST CARLO won the Great American at Brooklyn, the Foam Stakes at Ooney Island, the White 
Plains Handicap, was second to Chaos for the Futurity and won about »»,O00 III a two-year-old. He 
hTa wonderful young Sire, among his get being Ruinart (winner of the Burns Handicap, Palace Hotel 
Handicap and fStjffi, Zamar II (winner of 19 races as a two-year-old and $7695). Joan, February, Mt, 
"wthbert S T Calatin Count of Flanders' Lord Marmlon, May Boy, Our Climate, Glendinnlng and 



many others 



TERMS FOR THE SEASON, 



$100. 



For further particulars in regard to above Stallions apply to 

JAMES MCDONNELL, 

PORTO LA , San Mateo Co., Cal 



SIDNEY DILLON 23157 

Sire of DOLLY DILLON 2:07 (the fastest mara of 1901), 
B. S. DILLON '.4:215 and CAPTIVITY 2:284, 

Will make the Season of 1902 at 

SANTA ROSA STOCK FARM, SANTA ROSA, CAL. 

TERMS FOR THE SEASON, $35. 

" h0 Fo? P a^ u yage7nd P Xrt?ormation regarding shipment of mares address 

FRANK TURNER, Superintendent Santa Rosa Stork Farm. 
Or PIERCE BROS , 728 Montgomery St., S. F. SANTA ROSA, CAL. 



M< KINNEY 2:lli.f 
SIRE OF 

Coney 2:02 

Jennie Mac 2:09 

Hazel Kinney S:0BJ4 

Dr. Hook 2:10 

Zolock 2:104 

Zombro 2:11 

Charlie Mc 2:ll« 

You Bet 2: 1 1 % 

McZeus 1:13 

Osito 2:134 

Juliet D 2:134 

McUriar 2:14 

Sweet Marie (mat) 2:14 

Harvey Mao 2:14V* 

El Milagro 2:I4X 

Sola *.Uhi 

Geo W. McKinuey 2:144 

McNally 2:15 

Monica 2:15 

McKinnky at 14 years old 
has 

4 in the 2:10 list 
19 in the 2:15 list 
28 In the 2:20 list 
unequalled by any sire 
at the same age 

I i 

Telephone: Green 808. 




BY ALCYONE; DAM ROSA 
S PRAGUE fgrandam of Fereno 
(3) 2:10',) by GOV. SPRAGI K. 

By the percentage of his performances in the 2:15 and 2:20 lists lie 
the Champion Sire of the World at any age. 

A Race Horse Himself. He started in 28 races, won 
25, was second twice and third onca. 

He is a Sire of Race Horses. Every one of his 

get In the 2:20 list secured their records In races and 
are all race winners. 

He in the Champion in the Show Ring, Champion on tin 
Hare Track and Champion in tin Stinl. 

His get bring better prices than the get of anv other Stallion on 
this Coast. Nine sold in 1901 for from $1000 to J7500 eaoh. an 
average of 13490 each, and 110,000 was refused for a young 
McKiuney stallion 

He is i Complete Oulcross to all California /lares. 

In 1900 his get won first second and fourth money In the Pacific 
Breeders Futurity, first and second money In the Occident 
Stake and Ilrst, second uud third money in tbeStanford Slake. 
The McKinneys are stake winners. 

Will, MAKE THE SEASON OF 1902 AT 

SAN JOSE RACE TRACK 

Beginning Feb. 1st until further notice. 

In ease of failure 10 
get maro with foal she 
may be returned freo in 1903 if I still own the horse. All bills 
must be paid before removal of mare. 
Good pasturage for mares at reasonable rates 
ticulars address 

C. A. DURFEE, 

» Magnolia Ave, SAN JOSK, CAL 



Terms for the Season, $100. 



For further par- 



The Fast and Game Race 
Horse 

REY DIRECT 2:10 

iy Direct 2:0">J, Sire of Directly 2:03.|, and 

25 others in .standard time. 
Dam Vera (Dam of Rey Direct 2:10 and De 
Voras 2:11}) by Kontucky Volunteer. 

Will Make the Season or 19011 at 

LOS ANGELES 

TERMS FOB Tin: SEASON, B60, 

Payable at time of service, with return privilege. 
Hey Direct is as sure a foal getter as any horse in 
Amorlca. 



For tabulated pedigree and full particulars, address 



GEO. A. DAVIS, Pleasanton. Cal. 



Pedigrees 



Tabulated 



and Type Written, Ready for Framing. 



Write for prices. Bheedek and 
Sportsman, 36 Geary St., S. F. 



16 



[February L, 190 2 



'i ne Harness 




^mHORSE boo rs 



San Francisco, Cal.'* ^- 




Walter Winans 



Vice President of the National 
Rifle Association of Great Britain 



makes the following statement in his recent book, 
"Art of Revolver Shooting." 



SMOKELESS 



.44 



The U. M. C. Co., U. S. A., have supplied me with large quantities of 
gallery ammunition loaded with both round and semi-round bullets. 

These have a small charge of black powder, and I should prefer this 
ammunition for self-defense as well as for competition up to 20 yards, as I 
find it the most accurate for exhibition shooting. 

I think the U. M. C. gives slightly less recoil and fewer "unaccount- 
ables" than the English equivalent. 

They also load these cartridges with smokeless powder, which I have used and 
with which I have made my bests on record in the rapid fire competition. 

Seed for new U. M. C. illustrated catalogues for further information concerning those modern 
Short Range or Gallery Cartridges, which are coming into wide use among 
experts and others. Game Laws and Shooting Records Free 

The UNION METALLIC CARTRIDGE CO. 




AGENCY: 
313 Broadway, N. Y. 



Bridgeport, Conn. 



DEPOT: 
425 Market St., S. F.,Cal 





NUMBER 5 RIFLE 

A High-Power Arm adapted to Smokeless I'owder t'artridKes. 

OUR REMINGTON-LEE SPORTING RIFLE 

Without an Equal for Long Range Target and Big Game Shooting. 

Prank H. Hydo shot with a Remington-Lee Rifle and won 
The All-Comers Match, Seagirt, New Jersey, Sept. 10, 1!>01. 

Send for Catalogue describing same and Target Pistols, Shotguns, etc. 

REMINGTON ARMS GO. 



You can get 'hese Smokeless Powders in 

FACTORY ... CUn I ^ 
LOADED ..Oil LLL3 



DU PONT 
1 E. C." 
SCHULTZE 
HAZARD 



SHOTGUN RIFLEITE 
BALLISTITE 
LAFLIN & RAND 



ILION , N. Y. 



PACIFIC COAST DEPOT: 

425-427 MARKET ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Du Pont Gun Powder 

SMOKELESS 

SHOT GUN and 

MILITARY POWDER 

Black Powder for Sporting and Blasting Purposes 

The Reputation of a Hundred Years is the Guarantee of 



DU PONT POWDER 



O. A HAIGHT. Agent, 



226 Market Street, San Francisco 



SMITH GUNS 

At the Cal. Inanimate Target Association 
May 25-26, 1901. 

71 Shooters, 20 used Smith Guns. 

There were 11 Individual Trophies offered. 
Shooters using SMITH GUNS captured 9. 
Coast Record made by Edward Schultz. 112 Straight. 

Edgar Forster, high average, 95%. Ed. Schultz and Otto Peudner, 92% 
Webb, 91*%. E. Feudner, 89J%. Varien, 88%. F. Feudner, 87i% 
Flickinger; 87%. Shields and McCutchan, 86J%, Williamson, 86%. 

They all shot L. C. Smith Guns. 

Catalogue on application to 

HUNTER ARMS CO., Fulton, N. Y. 

HIL. B. BEKEABT CO., San Francisco, Gout Representative. 



What More do you Want? 



COAST RECORD. 

Made with SHOTGUN RIFLEITE 

EDWARD SCHULTZ 

112 Straight Targets. 

Ingleside, May 26, 1001. 



WORLD RECORD. 

Made with E. C. No. 1 
w. R. CROSBY 

345 Straight Targets. 

New York, April, 1901. 



Manufactured 



* THE AMERICAN "E. G." and "SCHULTZE" Gunpowder Co., Ltd 

PHIL. B BEKEART CO.. Pacific CoafU Representatl ir 



Clahrough, Golcher & Co, 



GUNS 
Gun Goods 



•»-8end for Catalogue 




FISHING 
Tackle 



538 MARKET STREET. S F 



The "Old Reliable" Parker 



once more proves its 
right to the title, 
the Grand Ameri- 
can Handicap of 
1900. 



1st— H. D. Bates, with 59 straight kills. 
2d— J. R. Malone, with 58 straight kills. 
3d— Phil Daly Jr., with 31 straight kills. 
All used the "Old Reliable." 




Also, as the official records show. 54 per cent of the 
entire purse won with Parkers; 37.5 per oent of all the 
guns winning money were Parkers; apd 34.6iper cent of all guns entered 
were Parkers, which proves that the Parker is unquestionably the most 

popular and "reliable" eun in the world. n. Y. Salesroom: 38 Warren St. 



PARKER BROTHERS 



MERIDEN CONN. 



©lie gsr#£frer aitfc ^povt&xnaix 



[February 8, 1902 



WESTCHESTER RACING ASSOCIATION. Washington Jockey Club. 



l/NDEK THE Al Sl'IC KS OF TIIK JOCKKY CLUB. 



WASHINGTON, D. C. 



RACE COURSE, 
MORRIS PARK, 
WESTCHESTER, N. 



OFFICE, Room 201, 571 Fifth Ave., Race Course and Office 
"The Windsor Arcade," 

NEW YORK 



During Race Meetings, 
BENN1NGS, D. C. 



Office in New York, 

Room 201, 571 Fifth Ave. 
"The Windsor Arcade.' 



Spring- and Autumn Meetings, 1902. | Spring and Autumn Meetings, 1902. 



TIIK FOLLOWING RACES ABB OPENED TO 

CLOSE MIDNIGHT OF 8AT0KDAY, FEBRUARY 15th. 

uilli a Supplementary CUmtlH for Hume as by the conditions. 

SPRING MEETING 

For Two=Year Olds. 



Spring Meeting from the Last Week in March to and include Aprii 12th, 



THK GAIETY— FILLIES— $1,200 Added 
The Gaiety, for Allies two years old, by sub- 
scription of $25 each, $10 forfeit with $1,21X1 added. 
To carry 112 lbs. winners extra. Last Jour and a 
half ,1'ni rlnnij*. Eclipse Course. 

THE BOUQUET— $1,200 Added. 
The Bouquet (Selling), for two-year obis, by 
subscription of *25 each, $10 forfeit, with $1,200 
added. Last .Hie furlongs of Hie Kdlpse I ourse. 
THE LAUREATE— $1,500 Added.' 
The Laureate, for two-year olds, by subscrip- 
tion of $30 each, half forfeit, with $1,500 added. 
Colts to carry 115 lbs . Allies and geldings. 112 lbs. 
Winners extra; maidens allowed 5 lbs Lust .tire 
furlongs of the Eclipse Course 

For Three-Year OlDs. 

THE LARCHMONT-$1,200 Added. 

The Lahchmont, for maiden three-year-olds at 
time of entry, by subscription of $25 each. $10 for- 
feit, with $1,200 added Colts to carry 115 lbs.: 
geldings 1 18 lbs., BDd Allies 110 lbs. Winnersextra. 
Last serin furlongs of the Withers Mile. 

THE BAYCHESTER— $1,200 Added. 

The B \ Yi iiKSTKH, for throe-year olds, non-win- 
ners of a race of the v alue of 11.000 in 11*01, by sub- 
scription of $25 each'. $10 forfeit with $1 200 added, 
of which $300 to the second, $200 to the tnird. 
Colts to carry 115 lbs,: geldings 112 lbs , ami Allies 
llOlbs Winners in 1M)2 extra Non-winning and 
maiden allowances. Tkt Withers Mile. 

THE VAN NEST— $1,200 Added 

The Van Nest (Sellingi, for three-year-olds, at 
10 lbs. under the scale, by subscription of $25 each. 
$10 forfeit, with $1,200 added. Lust sir ami a halt 
furlongs of the Withers Mile. 

THE POCANTICO— $151X1 Added. 

The Pocantico Handicap, for three year olds, 
by subscription of $30 each, only $10 if declared by 
2 p. M. of the day before the race; with $1,500 
added, of which $300 to the second, $200 to the 
third. Mile una 1 u sixteenth orer the //ill. 

For Three-Year=0lds and Upwards 

THE METROPOLITAN -$7,500 Added. 

The Metropolitan Handicap, for three-year 
olds and upwards, by subscription of $100 each, 
half forfeit, or $10 only if declared March 20lh. with 
$7,500 added. Weights to be announced March 4th, 
1902. The Withers Mile. 

THE HARLEM— $l,2IXj Added. 

The Haki.em (Selling), at 10 lbs. above the 
scale, for three-year-olds and upward, by subscrip 
tion of $25 each, $!0 forfeit, with $1,200 added. The ■ 
Witjters Mile. 

THE TOBOGGAN -$1,500 Added. 

The TOBOGGAN Handh ai\ for three-year olds ! 
and upward, by subscription of $30 each, $10 only ! 
if declared by 2 P. M of the day before the race, 
with $1,500 added. Ellipse Course. 

THE NEW ROCHELLE-$I,200 Added. 
The New Rocheli.e Handicap, for three-year- 
olds and upward, by subscription of $25 each, $10 
only if declared by 2 p. m of the day before the 
race, with $1,200 added. Last seren furlongs of 
the Withers Mile. 

SPRING SERIAL H ANDICAPS-$3,700 Added. 

Spring Serial Handicaps, for three year olds 
and upward. By subscription of $30 each, which 
shall entitle the entry to start in The Crotona, 
The Claremout and The Van Courtlandt Handi- 
caps on the payment of an additional starting fee 
of $10 for each race. 

Conditions ok The Crotona Handicap 
Starters to pay $10 additional with $1000 added. 
The last si.r furlongs of the Withers Mile. 

Conditions ok The Claremont Handicap. 
Starters to pay $10 additional with $1,200 added. 
Last six ami a half furlongs of the Withers Mile. 

Conditions of The Van Courtlandt Handi- 
cap. Starters to pay $10 each, $i 500 added. Last 
HMD furlongs of the Withers Mile 

JOCKEY CLUB WEIGHT FOR AGE RACE- 
$2,000 Added. 
The Jockey Ci.ru Weight for Ace Race for 
three-year-olds and upward, by subscription of $10 
each, starters to pay $15 additional with $2,000 
added. Mile ami a furlong. Withers Course. 

AMATEUR CUP— Selling— $1,000 Added. 
The Amateur Cup, a high-weight selling race 
at 40 lbs. above the scale. Of $250 in plate, and 
$750 in cash, for three-year-olds and upward, by 
subscription of $10 each if made on or before 
February 15, 1902: of $20 each it made on or before 
April 15. 1902. and $30 each if made on or before 
May 1, 1902, when subscribers must name their 
horses or pay forfeit. The Westchester Racing 
Association to add $350 in plate and $750 in cash. 
Starters to pay $50 additional To be ridden by 
gentlemen riders quallAed under the rules of the 
National Steeplechase and Hunt Association 
The Withers Mile. 

Steeplechases and Hurdle Races. 

ST. NICHOLAS HURDLE RACE-$600 Added. 

St. Nicholas Hurdle Race, at 10 lbs. under 
the scale, for four-year-olds and upward, by sub- 
scription of $10 each, starters to pay $15 additional. 
The Westchester Association to add $600 Mile 
unit a half over sis flight of hurdle*. 



KNICKERBOCKER HURDLE HANDICAP— 
$«00 Added. 

Knickerbocker Hurdle Handicap, for four- 
year-olds and upward, by subscription of $10 each. 
Starters to pay $15 additional. The Westchester 
Racing Association to add M00. Mile and three- 
quurters orer seren flight of hurdles. 

NEW YORK STEEPLECHASE-$750 Added. 

New York Steeplechase, at Id lbs under the 
scale, for four-year-olds anil upward, by subscrip- 
tion of $10 each. Starters to pay $15 additional. 
The Westchester Racing Association to add $750. 
About tiro miles. 

INTERNATIONAL STEEPLECHASE HANDI- 
CAP— $1,000 Added. 
International Steeplechase Handicap, for 
four-year-olds and upward, by subscription of $10 
each. Starters to pay $15 additional. The West- 
chester Racing Association to add $1,000. About 
two miles. 

THE GRAND NATIONAL STEEPLECHASE— 
$5,000 Added. 
The Grand National Steeplechase. A 
handicap for four year-olds and upward By sub- 
scription of $100 each, half forfeit, only $25 if de- 
clared by 2 p. m on the day preceding the race, 
with $5000 added— $2,500 by subscriptions of gen- 
tlemen interested in steeplechasing and $2,500 by 
the Westchester Racing Association. About tin, 
miles and a half. 

THE MEADOWBROOK HUNTERS STEEPLE- 
CHASE— $1,000 Added. 
The Meadow-brook. A Hunters Steeplechase 
for four year-olds and upward, qualified under the 
rules of the National Steeplechase and Hunt 
Association, or the Canadian Hunt Association, 
that have been regularly hunted during the season 
of 1901-1902 By subscription of $15 each, play or 
pay. if made by February 15, 1902. or of $30 each, 
play or pay, if made by April 26, 1902, with $1,000 j 
added. Mr August Belmont to add a Cup of the I 
value of $100 to the winner, if ridden bv a gentle- 
man rider. About tun miles and a half.' 

To be run at the Autumn 
Meeting, 1902. 



,S'ij//i!r//tt • nfitrtf Entr 



Auijist 



For Two=Year=0lds. 

THE NURSERY HANDICAP-$2,50O Added. 

The Nursery Handicap, for two-year-olds, 
foals of 19H0 If entered August 15, 19111. by sub- 
scription of $15 each, the only forfeit if declared 
May 1. 1902, or $25 if declared by 2 p. m. on the day 
before the race. If left in after that time to pay 
$50 each. 

If entered February 15, 1902, by subscription of 
$25 each, the only forfeit if declared May 1, 1902, 
or $50 if declared by 2 p. M. on the day before the 
race. If left in after that time to pay $100 each. 

If entered August 15. 1902. when the event shall 
close by subscription of $75 each, the only forfeit if 
declared by 2 p. m. on the day before the race. If 
left in after that time lo pay $150 each. With 
$2,5iio added. The Eclipse Course. 

THE CHAMPAGNE-$4,000 Added. 
Tub Champagne, for two-year-olds, by subscrip- 
tion of $50 each if entered February 15 1902, half 
forfeit, or $10 only if declared by August 15, 1902, 
or, if entered August 15, 1902, when the event shall 
be closed, at $100 each, half forfeit, with $4,000 
added. Last seren furlongs of the Withers Mile. 



THE WHITE 



PLAINS 
Added. 



HAN DICAP— $2,500 



THE VESTAL— $1,200 Added. 

* 

The Vestal, for three-year-old Allies, foals of 
IH99, non-winners of $2,000 in 1901. and non-wiuuers 
of $3 0011 in 190-v* a! time of starting. To close and 
name February 15. 1902, at $5 each If not declared 
by June 1, 1902. to pay $10 each If not declared 
by September I. 1902, to pay $15 each. If nol de- 
clared by November 1. 1902, to pav $20 each. 
Starters to pay $30 each, the Washington Jockey 
Club to add $l,2l)ii. To carry 123 lbs Penallies 
and allowances. 

The winning of $3,(XX)or more shall be equivalent 
to a declaration, tine mile unit u half. 



The Handicaps— The Consolation, The Dixie, 
Tie- Vestal — as below will close and name at mid- 
night of Saturday February 15th, 1902. 

The Bennings Spring Handicaps. 

To be run on the .first unit lust days of flu Spring 
' Meeting. 1008. 

Handicaps for three-year-olds and upward. By 
subscription of $10 each, which shall entitle the 
entry to start in the. First and Second Handicaps, 
on payment of the additional starting fee of $20 in 
each To close and name at midnight of Saturday, 
February 15th. 1902 Weights to be announced 
March 4th. 1902 

Conditions of the First Bennings Spring 
Handicap Starters to pay $20 each additional, 
with *7'XI added sir furlongs 

Conditions of the Second Bennings Spring 
Handicap Starters in pav $20 additional w ith 
$1,000 added. ft W " fm longs. 

Autumn Meeting- 1902. 

THE GRAND CONSOLATION— $2,500 Added. 

The Grand Consolation for two-year olds, 
foals of 1000. Non-winners of $5,(KK1 at time of 
starting. To cla»* and name February 15th. 1902, 
at $Ki each. If not declared by June 1st, 1902, to 
pay $25 each. If not declared by September 1st, 
1902, to pay $50 each. If not declared by November 
1st, 1902, to pay $100 each. Starters to pay $100 
additional. The Washington Jockey Club to add 
$2,500. Colts to carry 122 lbs., Allies and geldings 
119 lbs. Penalties aud allowances. 

The winning of $5,000 or more shall be equivalent 
to a declaration Seren furlongs. 

THE UIXIE-$I,500 Added. 

The Dixie, for three-year-olds, foals of IH99. non' 
winners of $2,000 in 1901 And non-winners of $3,1X10 
in I90i: at time of starting To close and name 
February 15th, 1902, at $10 each If not declared 
by June 1st, 1902. to pay $20 each. If not declared 
by September 1st, 1902, to pay 180 each If not 
declared by November 1st, 1902, to pay $40 each. 
Starters to pay $50 each, the Washington Jockey 
Club to add $1 B0U Colts to carry 128 lbs . Allies 
aud geldings 123 lbs. Penalties and allowances. 

The winning of $3 000-or more shall be equivalent 
to a declaration, line mile and three-quarters. 

NOTICE. 

Entries for the above are received only and under the conditions as printed, and in all respects 
subject to and in accordance with the rules of The Jockey Club and Washington Jockey Club. 

For entry blanks and informatfon address the Bhekdeh and Sportsman, 36 Geary Street. San 
Francisco, Cal. 



Autumn Meeting- 1903. 

THE DIXIE— $2,000 Added. 

The Dixie, for three-year-olds, foals of M80, 
non-winners of $5,1X10 in 1903 at time of starting. 
To close and name for now two-year-olds on Feb- 
ruary 15, 11X12, at $10 each If not declared by 
January I, 1 80S, to pay $20 each. If not declared 
by June 1, 1 90S, to pay $40 each If not declared 
by September I, 1903, to pay $60 each If not de- 
clared by November I, 1808. to pay $80 each. 
Starters to pay $100 The Washington Jockey 
Club lo add $2,(XXI Colts to carry 126 lbs , Allies 
and geldings 123 lbs Penalties and allowances. 

The winning of $.VXX| or more in 1903 to be 
equivalent to a declaration. One mile and three- 
quarters. 

THE VESTAL-$I,500 Added. 

The Vestal, for three-year-old Allies, foals of 
1000 non-winners of 15,00010 1908, at time of start- 
ing To close and name for now two-year-olds on 
February 15, I!xr2, at $5 each If not declared by 
January 1, 11X13, to pay $15 each. If nol declared 
by June 1, 1903, to pay $25 each If not declared 
by September I. 1903, to pay $40 each If not de- 
clared by November 1, 1908, to pav $6o each. 
Starters to pay $75 each The Washington Jockey 
Club to add $1,500 To carry 123 lbs Penalties 
and allowances. 

The winning of $5,000 or more in 1903, to be 
equivalent to a declaration tine mite unit u half. 



The White Plains Handicap, for two-year- 
olds, by subscription of $50 each, if entered 
February 15, 1902. half forfeit. or $10 only if declared 
August 15, 1902, or, if entered August 15, 1902, when 
the event shall be closed at $100 each, $50 forfeit. 
With $2.51X1 added The Eclipse Course. 

For Three=Year=0lds. 

THE JEROME HANDICAP— $2,000 Added. 
The Jerome Handicap, for three-year olds, if 
entered February 15. 1808, by subscription of $50 
each, half forfeit, only $10 if declared by August 
15, 1902. or. if entered August 15. 1902, when the 
event shall close. $100 each, half forfeit, with $2,000 
added. Mile and a quarter orer the hill. 

For Three-Year=0lds and Upward. 

THE MUNICIPAL HANDICAP— $2,500 Added. 

The Municipal Handicap, for three-year-olds 
and upward. If entered February 15, 1902, by sub 
scription of $50 each, $25 forfeit, or $10 only if 
declared by August 15, 1902; if entered by August 
15, 1902, when the event shall close, at $100 each, 
half forfeit. With $2,500 added. Mile tmd three- 
quarters orer the hill. 

MORRIS PARK AUTUMN WEIGHT FOR AGE 
RACE-$3.(XXJ Added. 

The Morris Park Autumn Weight for Age 
Race for three-year-olds and upward If entered 
February 15, 1902, by subscription of $50 each, $25 
forfeit, or only $10 if declared by August 15, 1902, if 
entered August 15, 1902, when the event shall close 
at$l(Xleach half forfeit. With $3,txxi added and 
the Woodlawn Vase, value $1,000 

Present Holder of the Vase F. C. McLewee 
& Co. with the four-year-old be Gold Heels by 
The Bard, dam. Heel and Toe 

'Two miles and a quarter. Withers Course. 



California State Agricultural Society, 

SACRAMENTO, CAL. 

SPECIAL HARNESS STALLION STAKE FOR 1905 

For the Get of Stallions that made Private or Public Service, 
Season of 1901, for their Foals of 1902. 

To Close Feb 15, 1902. 

The Race to be contested at State Fair at Sacramento 
in I905, when Foals are three years old 

Entrance fee for stallions to be the price that they made public service during the season of 1901. 
All other stallions that did not make public service, entrance fee to be $20. Stallions to be named 
with the Secretary, February 15, 1902. 

All foals that are the get of auy stallion entered in this stake to be eligible to be entered on June 
1,1903 Entrance fee $50 each, of which $5 must accompany the entry with breeding and name, if 
any, of foal, and a further payment of $10 March 1 I9(M, and a further payment of $15 each May 1, 
11X15, aud a Anal payment of $20 on the first day of August, 11X15, and all colts making this payment 
■hall be eligible to start. Starters to be named in writing through the entry box 4 p. M day before 
the race. 

The California State Agricultural Society to add an amount equal to all moneys paid in by the 
nominators of the stallions, not to exceed one thousand dollars. 

Entrance moneys paid in for stallions and added moneys shall be divided 60? ' to the end for 
trotting colts and 40° to the end for pacing colts No nominator allowed to start more than one colt 
in either end. 

The nominator of any colts shall on May 1, 1905. then declare as to the trotting or pacing end he 
desires to start his colts All moneys paid in on colts transferred to the pacing division shall be 
segregated and placed to the credit of the pacing stake, and all other paymentsshall be placed to the 
credit of the trotting stake. 

All payments not made as they become due declares entry out and releases subscriber from 
further liability. 

Hopples barred in both classes Mile heats, three in Ave. 

Nominator of the sires of the winning colts in each end to receive $250. to be deducted from the 
money added by the Society and the money paid in as entrance on stallions, balanoe of the Btakes 
aud added money to be divided 50, 25, 15 and 10%. 

Right reserved to declare two starters a walk over, for stakes paid in only. 

When only two start they may contest for all entrance money paid in, not heretofore provided for, 
to be divided 66* 3 per cent to the winner and S3' 3 percent lo the second horse. A horse distancing Ihe 
held in either class shall be entitled to all moneys paid in and 25°; only of the money added by the 
Society, not heretofore provided for. 

Open to all stallions that have made private or public service in any of the following States: 
California. Oregon. Washington, Montana Idaho, Colorado, Wyoming, Utah, Nevada and Arizona 
during the season of 1901. 

No entry will be accepted except under this condition: That all disputes that may arise in 
regard to the conditions or contest of this race, shall be settled by Ihe Board of Directors of the Cali- 
fornia State Agricultural Society, or those whom they may appoint, and their decision shall be Anal. 



NOTICE. 

Entries for the above received only and under the conditions as printed, and in all respects sub" 
ject to and in accordance with tho rules of The Jockey Club. National Steeplecaa.e and Hunt Asso" 
elation, and Westchester Racing Association 

Forentrs blanks and information address the BREEDER and Sportsman, 36 Geary Street. San 

Francisco, Cal. 



Remember the date of Closing for Stallions is FEBRUARY 15, 1902. 



GEO. W. JACKSON. 

Secretary. 

Office — New l'avllon, Sacramento. 



A. B. SPRECKELS. 

President. 



Pedigrees Tabulated 

PORTSMAN, i)fi Geary street. San Francipcti . Cal. 



and type written ready for framing 
Write for prices. BREEDER AND 



F KH RUAKY 8, I902J 



3 



Barondale 2:11 1-4 Meeting With Favor. 

The breeding of the stallion Barondale 2:11.}, which 
Tom James of Iowa has brought to California, i9 
attracting much attention from breeders and mares 
are being booked to the son of Baron Wilkes already. 
Those who have seen Barondale say that he is a grand 
Individual and fully up to what one would expect from 
his breeding. Mr. Martin Carter looked him over one 
day last week while in San Jose and decided to send 
his great mare Lida W. 2:18}, the dam of Nutwood 
Wilkes 2:16$, to him. It should be a great cross. Be- 
sides being a son of the renowned Baron Wilkes he 
is so richly bred on his dam's side that those who 
believe in theefficacy of great broodmares in a pedigree 
are enthusiastic over Mr. James' horse. 

Nathalie, his first dam, is by Nutwood. She has 
produced Barondale 2:11 } and Grand Baron 2:12}. She 
i9 an own sister to the great broodmare Clarinda, dam 
of Pat Clair 2:22 and Patriot 2:24. She is a half sister 
to Patron 2:14}, sire of Ananias 2:05 and six more in 
the 2:15 list, to Prodigal 2:10, sire of John Nolan 2:08 
and nine more in 2:15, and to Patronage, the sire of 
Alix 2:033, the world's champion trotting mare. 

Bjatrico, his second dam, is by Cuyler 100, and is 
the dam of Prodigal 2:1(5, Patron 2:14} and Patronage 
4143, and is a full sister to Elvira, the dam of Queens- 
ware 2:25 and Ponce de Leon 2:13, the sire of Edwin B. 
2:12}, Percy 2:13 and Preston (3) 2:13}. 

Mary Mambrino, founder of the great family which 
bears her name, is the third dam of Barondale and is 
by Mambrino Patchen 58. She is the dam of Elvira 
2:18$ as a four year old, a champion record at the time, 
and is the grandam of over 60 in the 2:30 list. 

From here on Barondale's dams run into the thor- 
oughbred families, his fourth dam being by Embry's 
Wagner, a son of the great four mile race horse 
Wagner, the fifth dam Lady Bell is recorded on page 
12(3, Volume 2, of Bruce's American Thoroughbred 
Stud Book, and was by Bellfounder Jr., the sixth dam 
by Monmouth Eclipse, seventh dam the celebrated 
Multifiora by Kosciusko, eighth dam by Rosicrusian, 
ind on to the eleventh dam, a mare by imp. Brilliant. 

Few trotting stallions have a pedigree that can be 
tabulated as far as that of Barondale. 



Monterey 2:09 1-4 in the Stud. 

Many breeders in California will be glad to know 
that after much correspondence with Eastern parties 
who desired to buy or lease that great son of Sidney, 
Monterey 2:09}, his owner, P. J. Williams, has con- 
cluded to keep the horse here and place him in the 
stud. Mr. Williams will divide Monterey's time be- 
tween the farm at Mil pitas and San Lorenzo, which 
latter point is easily accessible from all points in this 
part of the State. If Monterey ever goes East, and 
the probabilities are that some astute breeder will yet 
offer Mr. Williams a price for him that ho cannot afford 
to refuse, there will be many Californians who will 
regret that they did not broed to him when they had 
the chance. His crop of two year olds, though not nu- 
merous, contains so many high class promising young- 
sters that parties owning them want more of the same 
kind and have been writing to Mr. Williams and book- 
ing their mares. Monterey is by the great sire Sidney 
and outof a great broodmare by Commodore Belmont, 
son of Belmont 64 that sired Nutwood 2:18i|. Mon- 
terey's breeding is all right and his individuality is of 
the highest order. No grander looking stallion will 
stand for service in this State, and his extreme speed 
and marvelous action are the very acme of the quali. 
fications demanded in a sire. Monterey will bo in the 
great table as soon as his colts are old enough to start 
in races, and ho will bo a much sought after stallion 
before many years have passed. 



A Handsome Filly 

Sacramento, Feu. 5, 1902. 
Breeder and Sportsman: — My mare Abbie 
Woodnut, the dam of Diawood 2:11, and Abdine 2:17, 
foaled a handsome chestnut filly January 10th by 
Nutwood Wilkes 2:16$. Horsemen that have seen this 
filly say she is the handsomest youngstor they ever 
saw, and that she is worth lots of money. She has 
two crosses to the world's champion sire Nutwood 
2:18$. I claim the name Lady Carrota for this royally 
bid little mi9S. Mrs. E. W. CALLENDINE. 

Breeding of Cassiar 20491. 

A subscriber at Rohnerville, Humboldt county, 
writes for the breeding of the dam's side of the horso 
Cassiar by Soudan 5103. Cassiar's dam is Carrie 
Malone (full sister to Charles Derby 2:20, Klatawah (3) 
2:05$, Steineer 2:29}, H. S. Covey 2:25 and Sunlight 
2:25) by Steinway, second dam Katie G. by Electioneer 
third dam Fanny Malone by Niagara, fourth dam 
Fanny Wickham by importod Herald, fifth dam by 
imported Trustee. Cassiar has no standard record. 



Nutwood Stock Farm String at Pleasanton 

William Cecil, trainer for the Nutwood Stock Farm 
arrived at Pleasanton track this week with nine head 
of trotters and pacers from the farm, all with one ex- 
ception sired by Nutwood Wilkes 2:16$. 

In the string is that good trotting gelding Bob 
Ingersoll 2:14$, that has entirely recovered from his 
sioknoss of last year, and will be fighting for a 2:10 or 
better record this season. 

Irvington Boy 2:17iJ has also rounded to after a 
wrestle with the distemper last year. He is one of 
the gamest pacers ever foaled and will bo a good horse 
in his class on tho California circuit. 

Verona 2:27 is a handsome filly whoso mark made last 
year is no measure of her speed, as she has trotted 
much faster since it was made. She is out of a mare 
by California Nutwood, second dam by Grand Moor. 

A pacer that is showing well is called Mixer. He is 
a threo year old, and a full brother to the trotter Bob 
Ingersoll. Another of this family is Muriel C. a two 
year old full sister to Mixer and Bob that trots with 
an easy open gait that is the admiration of everyone. 

A four year old out of a mare by Direct Line is very 
promising as is a full sister, a natural pacer. 

The only one in the string that was not sired by 
Nutwood Wilkes is a two year old filly by Searchlight 
2:03} , dam Zeta Carter by Director, second dam Lida 
W. 2:18}, dam of Nutwood Wilkes. This filly is very 
promising. 

Cecil believes he has the best string of youngsters 
he has ever handled and that he will givo several of 
them records and reduce tho marks of the record 
holders. 

There are a number of others left at the farm at 
Irvington, among them a two year old brother to 
John A. McKerron 2:06:} that will be a larger horse 
than his famous brother in all probability and will also 
bo fast as he can show a very fast gait now. There is 
also a four year old sister to McKerron on the farm. 
She was bred to Mendocino, the Palo Alto stallion last 
year. Mr. Carter is not certain she is with foal. If 
not she will be worked some this year and may be 
given a record. 

Azmoor 2:20 1-2 at Sacramento. 

Mr. H. W. Davis, of Auburn, Placer county, was the 
purchaser of the stallion Azmoor at tho Palo Alto sale. 
As the well known horseman, Vet Tryon, made the 
high bid on the hor3e it was naturally supposed he 
was purchasing for Rancho del Paso and it was so 
announced by Mr. Layng, of the auction firm, but Mr. 
Tryon was acting for Mr. Davis, who has placed the 
stallion in Vet's hands, and Azmoor will make the sea- 
son of 1902 at tho Sacramento track, at the low fee of 
$25. Had Azmoor. sired nothing but Betonica 2:10$ he 
would be considered a successful horse, as Betonica is 
one of the grandest looking stallions in America and 
has been a public exhibition mile in 2:06|; but he also 
sired Azmon 2:13$, Bob 2:15, Rowena (2) 2:17. Bonni- 
bel (4) 2:17$, Mary Osborno (3) 2:28} and othors. Az- 
moor is by tho great Electioneer and his dam the noted 
thoroughbred mare Mamie C. that produced three 
standard trotters and is the grandam of one. The sire 
of the dam of Mamie C. was imported Hercules, whose 
get are all noted for size and extreme beauty as well as 
great stamina. At $25 Azmoor is one of tho cheapest 
stallions to breed to in California. 

Stam B. 2:11 1 4 Arrives at Pleasanton. 

Pleasanton, fkhy. 5, 1002. 

Bhkkdkh and Sportsm a Ni — Stam B. 2:11} arrived 
here today in fine form. He is surely a grand individual, 
much grander than I expected to see, as I have not 
seen him since he was a four yoar old, six years ago. 
His book is now open. Samuel Gamblb. 

Messrs. Pierce Bros., of the Santa Rosa Stock Farm, 
are purchasing Electionoor broodmares to cross with 
their splendid stallion Sidney Dillon. Knowing that 
stallions with the blood of Strath more in them have 
proven valuable to breed to such mares, for instance 
Steinway, who sired Klatawah 2:05$, Chas. Derby 2:20, 
Sylvan way 2:10',, etc., out of Electioneer mares, thoy 
are taking no chances. They bred Sidney Dillon to 
Dolly by Electioneer and got Dolly Dillon 2:07, tho 
champion trotting mare of 1901. At tho recent Palo 
Alto sales they purchased Memento 2:25}, Miss Nando 
2:29$ (dam of Nordoau 2:17$), Lady well 2:16$ and Lady 
Agnes (dam of two), all by Electionoor. They have 
mares by Anteeo 2:16} and Advertiser 2:15 also, so 
they aro keeping thoir famous farm and its horses to 
tho front. 

Sam Gamble writes us that his colors for 1902 will be 
a red vest and a hammor, and that ho will wear his 
pantaioons well turned up. We can account for the 
selection of the red vest and tho turn in tho pantaloons 
as Mr. Gamblo now has Stam B. 2:11 }, ono of tho hand- 
somest stallions in America, but we can't make out 
what the hammer is for unloss Sam intends knocking 
the knockers. If that's it we hope ho will "strike till 
the last armed foe oxpires." 



Novel Harness Racing. 

If the present plan9 of well-known horsemen aro 
carried out New York followers of harness racing will 
see in the spring, at soinoTrear-by track, a novel meet- 
ine, held for the purpose of testing tho merits of num- 
erous departures from the present system of trotting. 

There has been for a long timo much discussion and 
criticism concerning the trotting turf, its lack of pro- 
gress, its needs and its shortcomings. Many sugges- 
tions have been made with a view to improving the 
sport, and it is now proposed to give a fair and open 
trial to some of the most important of the changes 
advocated. The system in vogue on the running turf 
is to be followed very closely in many particulars- 
dashes, handicaps and selling races being notable 
features of tho programme. 

Francis M. Ware, the secretary of tho Newport 
Horse Show, is the originator of the project. Ten or 
more men are to subscribe $1,000 each as a guarantee 
fund to finance a six days' meeting in May or June. 
No profit is sought and no loss is expected. The out- 
lay will be limited to $12,000, but it is deemed safe to 
have in hand a sufficient amount to defray all expenses 
regardless of receipts. 

Following are some of the special conditions which 
will govern the proposed meeting: 

One two-in-three mile-heat race and four dashes 
daily; dashes to be at varying distances over one mile. 
Distance, in at least three heat races, to be 40 yards. 
Weight to be waived in all dashos, except thoso undor 
saddle. Some races to be handicaps by distance, some 
by weight and some by time. One race daily a selling 
race. Some races to wagon, some to saddle. All en- 
trance fees to be 5 percent only, spot cash, and none 
conditional. 

Drivers to wear silk jackets and caps, and claim 
colors at entry. Grooms to wear clean jumpers or 
their own coats. Ten dollars fine to employer for 
every violation of this rule. 

Starters in all races limited to eight. Should twelve 
or more remain in race, management to separate them 
by lot, add $200 to amount offered for original event, 
and divide this sum into two purses. At least two 
races to be sweepstakes, i. e., all entrance money added 
to purses; and one event "free entrance," but $20 to 
withdraw. 

A paddock to be provided, and all horses brought 
to it before their races and kept there until after 
finish. Grooms restricted to its confines. 

Not more than two scores allowed in each heat or 
dash. If tho word is not then given all entries to be 
lined up at the 40-yard distance and started flat-footed. 
In at least two heat races horses to be drawn by lot 
into two sets, ono set to contest the first heat, the 
other the socond, the first three in each heat to con- 
tost tho third and last. Money awarded on positions 
in last heat. Distance, 40 yards. 

Hopples barred in certain races. No heat betting 
allowed; betting on raco results only. 

Selling race winners to be sold immediately after 
drivers dismount. Claims for beaton horses must be 
made to secretary within 15 minutes after winner 
passes the wire; all beaten horsos must remain in pad- 
dock up to that timo or bo liable to a fine of $50. 

All starts in handicaps to be llat-footed and at sound 
of gong or megaphone. Entries close for first day ono 
woek in advance; for each day thereafter at 4 P. M. on 
tho day before. Declarations for all races of tho day 
must bo made one clear hour before start for first raco 
and conspicuously posted. 

Hero is the first day's program, as framed by Mr. 
Ware: 

First raco— Purse $600 ($400, $150, $50): milo heats, 
best two in throe; in harness; trotters. 

Second race— Purse $350 ($225, $100, $25^; dash, 1$ 
miles; in harness; trotters. 

Third race — Purso $350; dash, 1 J miles; in harness; 
pacers. 

Fourth race — Purse $350; dash, 1 miles; to wagon; 
pacors and trotters. 

Fifth race — Purse $350; dash, 1$ miles; to saddle 
pacers; to carry 150 pounds. 

Subscriptions to tho meeting aro to bo received up 
to February 15th . 



It seems that Cresceus was not the only money win- 
nor on tho rocont trip of tho champion through the 
Southwest. His prompter, Mike tho Tramp, is not 
an ovcr-handsomo horso, but ho can move like tho 
real thoroughbred he is when called upon to do so. 
Dcwn in Arizona some of the nativo cowboys jollied 
Mike's caretaker, Eddio Mitchell, about tho runner's 
lack of beauty) so Eddie got even with thom by start- 
ing Mike in tho running races provided for tho cow- 
boys' ponies, and making thom all look like the pro- 
verbial 30 conts. 

Like all good things, Jackson's Napa Soda hasa 
dozen counterfeits. Watch out I 



4 



(The gveebev mifc gtportemcm 



[February S, 1902 



Matinee Racing at Los Angeles. 

[Herald, February 2U.] 
Under ordinary circumstances it is the custom of the 
Driving Club to bring its matinees to a close as early 
as 4 o'clock and not later than 4:30. Tho custom was 
brokon yesterday, however, and it was nearly 5:30 
o'clock when tho last race had been decided. There 
were nine events on the card, three of them out of the 
ordinary run of races. As only fourteen heats were 
contested during the afternoon and as a pool box is 
not in evidence to be fed, the program dragged to a 
considerable degree. The track was very dusty, and 
late in tho afternoon a cold wind interfered witk the 
sport. 

Perhaps the performance of the "guideless wonder,'' 
General Wiles, afforded more interest than any other 
attraction, General Wiles was scheduled to go a mile 
"without firfrler or sulky." The docile animal, gaily 
caparisoned in white, made tho mile with one long 
break. Ho was followed around the track by a broncho 
hitched to a cart. Tho long break did not suit the 
judges, and they asked that the ( Ieneral trot another 
mile. This did not suit tho horse, and he made several 
determined efforts to get past the drawgate toward 
tho stables. He was finally led past the drawgate and 
started on a second journey. The horse trotted the 
back quarter in 33 seconds, a 2:12 gait, and then con- 
cluded to run for nearly half a mile, finally crossing 
under tho wire at a fine trot. Ho made a final break 
for tho exit and was led out. 

The second feature, from the horseman's point of 
view, was of much more interest. K. V. Red path and 
G. B. Tibbott have for weeks been working Bastina 
and General Wiles as a team for the purposs of making 
a try for tho matinee team record of 2:30}. The effort 
was made yesterday afternoon, and the horses went 
the distance without a skip in 2:20}, four seconds bet- 
ter than the local record and equal to the State record. 
Beforo the trial Mr. Iled path said that he believed the 
team could Do workod to boat the State record, after 
the mile was made his opinion was concurred in by" a 
number of horsemen. 

Tho third novelty, the half-mile riding race, runners 
barred, proved a fizzle. Two hors